Winter Tire discussion

Which tires?

  • Pirelli Sottozero S2

    Votes: 17 37.0%
  • Michelin X-Ice Xi3

    Votes: 29 63.0%

  • Total voters
    46

ravisorg

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So far very happy with them. Pros: they stick well to the ice and snow we’ve had the last couple weeks. Cons: expensive.
 

EValuatED

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Also: The Tesla package should be using the same 235/45 R18 98V I got, so appropriate to handle power & load.
 

Van_smile

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Assuming you enjoy the car's sharp handling and like tossing it around on a regular basis, out of those three I'd hands-down go for the Sottozeros. I've tried a few different winters so far and currently have the R3 and while it's most definitely the flat out best (well at least in studless) for pure ice and snow traction, they are no fun whatsoever on cold, dry surfaces. Even though I live in one of the worst North American winter climes I'm going to keep them aside for rallies and go back to a V-rated winter for daily use.
In your case for the few hours you spend in really bad conditions the Sottozeros (or any of the top-tier V-rated winters) will do fine and you'll find the car much more enjoyable the rest of the time. As an experiment I put on a set of the least expensive V-rated winter my company distributes and went out and did a little demo video. The car had plennnnttyyy of grip and was super controllable in both standard and Track modes.
Variation on this scenario for Vancouver, BC (Pacific Northwest): I'm mostly commuting my M3 AWD on wet roads between 0-7C, with the occasional foray into proper winter conditions for ski trips into the province, or the odd storm that does bring the South Coast snow and below 0C temps. Recommendation for Sottozeros still apply for cold but wet roads? My alternate was the Nokian WRG4, but I've found on other EVs they start to slip of of a start with still lots of tread left.

Thanks in advance!
 

PNWmisty

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Variation on this scenario for Vancouver, BC (Pacific Northwest): I'm mostly commuting my M3 AWD on wet roads between 0-7C, with the occasional foray into proper winter conditions for ski trips into the province, or the odd storm that does bring the South Coast snow and below 0C temps. Recommendation for Sottozeros still apply for cold but wet roads? My alternate was the Nokian WRG4, but I've found on other EVs they start to slip of of a start with still lots of tread left.

Thanks in advance!
I have one season on the Sottozero II's on my P3D and they are very confidence inspiring and fun to drive hard in the corners on very cold, wet roads. That said, there are tires that are more resistant to hydroplaning when hitting standing water at high speeds.

I do think the Sottozero's will maintain their very good performance on cold wet roads as they wear down because, as far as I know, they don't overlay a softer rubber compound over a harder rubber like some winter tire manufacturers do. I'm thrilled to have a winter tire that doesn't turn my Model 3 into a dog when driving on bare pavement. And they work pretty well in the snow/ice too.
 

Mad Hungarian

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Variation on this scenario for Vancouver, BC (Pacific Northwest): I'm mostly commuting my M3 AWD on wet roads between 0-7C, with the occasional foray into proper winter conditions for ski trips into the province, or the odd storm that does bring the South Coast snow and below 0C temps. Recommendation for Sottozeros still apply for cold but wet roads? My alternate was the Nokian WRG4, but I've found on other EVs they start to slip of of a start with still lots of tread left.

Thanks in advance!
I'm with @PNWmisty on this, assuming you seek to have two dedicated sets of wheels and tires for summer and winter, the Sottozero II's or any of the V speed rated winters will be a great choice for the conditions you describe. Even on the odd day where temps might creep into the tenns (Celcius) a V rated winter will do fine, and it'll be better than an all-season (even a Snowflake rated one) when it does get cold and nasty.
 
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My model 3 would be the first vehicle I have owned where I have winter set of wheels and tires and a summer set of wheels and tires, I don't have a problem rotating my tires myself in my garage I have a few jack pads and low profile floor jacks. I just think there should be a set of all season tires like my Challenger has I have a four-wheel drive GT Challenger 2018 goes great in the snow and handles great in the summer. Living in Northeast Ohio are winters are a crap shoot. Last year only had a few days maybe a week where snow tires were needed. My continentals are terrible in the snow so I let the wife drive the Challenger. any recommendations on an all-season tire would be much appreciated. Basically with my wife driving cornering and handling is not an issue she uses it as a daily driver already has 20 k on it from last September.
 

garsh

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My model 3 would be the first vehicle I have owned where I have winter set of wheels and tires and a summer set of wheels and tires, I don't have a problem rotating my tires myself in my garage I have a few jack pads and low profile floor jacks. I just think there should be a set of all season tires like my Challenger has I have a four-wheel drive GT Challenger 2018 goes great in the snow and handles great in the summer. Living in Northeast Ohio are winters are a crap shoot. Last year only had a few days maybe a week where snow tires were needed. My continentals are terrible in the snow so I let the wife drive the Challenger. any recommendations on an all-season tire would be much appreciated. Basically with my wife driving cornering and handling is not an issue she uses it as a daily driver already has 20 k on it from last September.
What you want is a winter performance tire. :cool:

Yeah, I didn't realize that was a thing either until I started hanging out here. ;)

They're designed to work well in cold weather, providing superb traction on dry and wet surfaces. They are decent in the snow (a bit better than an all-season tire), but not as good as a dedicated snow tire.
 

PNWmisty

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My model 3 would be the first vehicle I have owned where I have winter set of wheels and tires and a summer set of wheels and tires, I don't have a problem rotating my tires myself in my garage I have a few jack pads and low profile floor jacks. I just think there should be a set of all season tires like my Challenger has I have a four-wheel drive GT Challenger 2018 goes great in the snow and handles great in the summer.
There is nothing about the Model 3 that causes special tire needs. If anything, it is more capable in the snow/ice than other cars of its weight and drivetrain type (AWD or RWD). We have an AWD that we put dedicated winter tires on (Pirelli Sottozero II's) and use in the snow and ice a lot and a RWD that uses the OEM Michelin all-season radials year round because it mostly stays in the PWW lowlands where snow is not as common (but I have had it in the snow and ice, last year was a "wintery" winter). It does great in the snow and is very confidence inspiring but there is only so much an all-season radial can do, particularly in wetter snow and on colder ice. The Performance Winter tires I run on the AWD are miles better than the all-seasons, not even close when it gets nasty. What makes them a "dedicated winter tire" is the rubber compound and the fact that they will be destroyed in warmer weather. They are a winter only tire (even if they do drive nicely in milder weather).

Occasional snow can be dealt with at slow speeds by all-season radials but I certainly wouldn't want to find myself at 60 mph on icy highways without winter tires on! It's worth the hour or so twice a year to put on appropriate tires for the conditions. And, as Garsh mentioned, performance winter tires will drive well on bare pavement. But you do need to take them off for warmer weather. The Sottozero's performance on treacherous winter roads is FAR better than any all-season radial I've ever driven and not quite as good as the most extreme winter tires. I would say, in general snow/ice they are within 1/3 of the way to extreme winter tires and 2/3 better than all-seasons that are known for having reasonably good snow/ice performance (for all-season radials). This works out really well, even under conditions that are challenging the SUV's of the winter world because the Model 3 has a low center of gravity, corners very flat and has superior electronic traction and stability controls. But you still need to change a Performance Winter tire out for the summer or they will be destroyed and never work well as a winter tire again. It's worth it.
 

Skione65

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What you want is a winter performance tire. :cool:

Yeah, I didn't realize that was a thing either until I started hanging out here. ;)

They're designed to work well in cold weather, providing superb traction on dry and wet surfaces. They are decent in the snow (a bit better than an all-season tire), but not as good as a dedicated snow tire.
@garsh and @groundlevelpaint,

I seconds garsh’s comment. I run Michelin PS4’s in the summer (a summer performance tire) and the Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4’s (winter performance tire) in the winter. What a KILLER winter tire. Drives just as good as the summers....excellent, ESPECIALLY in the wet, cold weather. Highly recommend them. Can’t say enough. Do the change out seasonally myself. Awesome.

Ski
 
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yeah I just don't get it with the model three's low center of gravity and excellent weight distribution there should be a tire that does not need to be changed out winter or summer. I bought a set of 18s winter tires from Tesla. I thought for sure being an all-wheel drive that it would go good in the winter but with the continentals it really sucked slid right through a stop sign and it wasn't really that bad out. Until I wear out the tires I have I'll put The pirelli winter tires on this fall and then shop around for some tires for next summer. Already got 20K on the Continentals and down to 532 seconds so hope to make it through The summer and put the winter pirelli's
on.
 
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Two questions for the mad Hungarian I listen to your podcast and I look at your advice importantly, tire rotation for an all-wheel drive diagonal or front to rear? Also my wife fell into a pothole tour sidewalk 20K on the tires had to replace one. 5/32 le
 

mswlogo

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yeah I just don't get it with the model three's low center of gravity and excellent weight distribution there should be a tire that does not need to be changed out winter or summer. I bought a set of 18s winter tires from Tesla. I thought for sure being an all-wheel drive that it would go good in the winter but with the continentals it really sucked slid right through a stop sign and it wasn't really that bad out. Until I wear out the tires I have I'll put The pirelli winter tires on this fall and then shop around for some tires for next summer. Already got 20K on the Continentals and down to 532 seconds so hope to make it through The summer and put the winter pirelli's
on.
Not surprised a bit the Continentals are crap in snow. They are border line Summer Performance tires.

If you want one tire consider an All Weather tire like the WR Nokians. But those are a compromise too.

If want great efficiency, longevity and quietness on your 19, check out Pirelli P7+ tires when replacing Continentals.
 

PNWmisty

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I thought for sure being an all-wheel drive that it would go good in the winter but with the continentals it really sucked slid right through a stop sign and it wasn't really that bad out.
AWD has nothing to do with stopping well, that's all up to the tires and the anti-lock braking system.
[removed snippy speculation]
 
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AWD has nothing to do with stopping well, that's all up to the tires and the anti-lock braking system.
[removed snippy speculation]
Paddy so true if it was night time or if I applied the brakes but Smith through the stop sign with regen. And my sunglasses are barely noticeable if compared to an
unshaded model 3. Bottom line tires are for summer driving handles fine on wet roads.
 
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mswlogo

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@PNWmisty thanks for the comment on hard under-layers on some tires, might explain why successive sets of my Nokian WRGx’s went from hero to zero so fast on my previous EVs.
Nokian WRGx’s is not one such a tire. Nor are most snow tires. In fact, the only snow tire I know of that uses different compounds at different layers is a few select models of Blizzak.

Every tire has compromises, including Sottozero. If you think Nokians had a short lifespan just wait to see how long Sottozero’s perform.

Every snow tire will wear out fast in summer.