Will charging off a NEMA 6-15 plug damage auto

kyrral

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#1
I have an existing 6-15 240 plug that I used to charge my Volt. It looks like it is wired up to an old 40amp breaker (instead of the 15 amp breaker). Will this cause me any grief if I buy Tesla's adapter to plug in my extended range 3?
 

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#3
I have an existing 6-15 240 plug that I used to charge my Volt. It looks like it is wired up to an old 40amp breaker (instead of the 15 amp breaker). Will this cause me any grief if I buy Tesla's adapter to plug in my extended range 3?
Not safe. A 6-15 probably uses a 12 gauge wire. (A 14gauge wire is also possible). If 12 it might handle 20 A but no more. A 40 amp breaker is a fire hazard. If you mean a 6-50 that can use a 50 amp breaker if it has the correct wire size. Check it carefully. Remember 240 volt uses double breakers.
 

kyrral

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#4
My bad. I have a 6-30R receptacle that is wired to a 40amp double breaker (there are 2 breaker switches that move together and have 40 on each handle). Nobody seems to make an adaptor. Assuming the wire size is correct (an electrician did install it) can I replace the plug with another 3 wire receptacle that Tesla does make an adaptor for?
 

MelindaV

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#5
My bad. I have a 6-30R receptacle that is wired to a 40amp double breaker (there are 2 breaker switches that move together and have 40 on each handle). Nobody seems to make an adaptor. Assuming the wire size is correct (an electrician did install it) can I replace the plug with another 3 wire receptacle that Tesla does make an adaptor for?
were you using a J1772 plug with the Volt? if so, you could keep with that setup plus the J1772->Tesla adaptor that came with your car.
 

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#6
My bad. I have a 6-30R receptacle that is wired to a 40amp double breaker (there are 2 breaker switches that move together and have 40 on each handle). Nobody seems to make an adaptor. Assuming the wire size is correct (an electrician did install it) can I replace the plug with another 3 wire receptacle that Tesla does make an adaptor for?
Yes assuming it has the correct wire for 40a you can replace it with a 6-50r or a 14-50r if you have a neutral and use the mobile connector since it is limited to 32a and you should label the outlet "32a max for Tesla only". Otherwise you should replace the breaker with a 30a.
 
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garsh

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My bad. I have a 6-30R receptacle that is wired to a 40amp double breaker... Assuming the wire size is correct (an electrician did install it)
If an electrician did this, then I don't think I'd be asking that electrician to do any more work. A 6-30 receptacle should be protected by a 30 amp breaker. Using a 40 amp breaker is a fire hazard waiting to happen.

Given that, the first thing I suggest doing is actually checking the wire size. I would NOT trust that it's sized correctly for the breaker. If it's Romex wire (3 or 4 individual wires in a white sheath), then the gauge should be printed periodically on the sheath. Otherwise, you could use calipers to measure the diameter of the conductor (after turning off the breaker!).

If the wire is 6- or 8-gauge, then you can keep the 40 amp breaker and replace the receptacle with a 6-50 or 14-50. If it's 10-gauge, then you should replace that breaker with a 30 amp breaker, and probably replace the receptacle with a 10-30 (however, Tesla is currently OOS of the 10-30 adapters).
 

kyrral

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#8
Thanks for insights. First, yes it is a J1772 plug but apparently they come in different external configurations and my volt is too big.
Checking wire gauge is good but quick question. the wiring is red, black and green and looks like it has lettering on the outside. If I pull it will it have the gauge on the outside? I'm supernervous about anything electrical other than carpet shock. 2nd question? Can you tell me what the #'s mean on 6-50 and 14-50? And what is an R at the end.
 

garsh

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#10
Thanks for insights. First, yes it is a J1772 plug but apparently they come in different external configurations and my volt is too big.
I'm not sure what you're trying to say here. J1772 is a single standard size. There is no "external" difference. If you have a J1772 EVSE that works with your Volt, then it will also work with your Tesla. You just need to use the J1772 adapter that came with your Tesla. It looks like this:

Checking wire gauge is good but quick question. the wiring is red, black and green and looks like it has lettering on the outside. If I pull it will it have the gauge on the outside?
OK, so it sounds like you have individual wires instead of Romex.
Make sure you turn the breaker off first.
Then remove the outlet, and pull the wire on the outlet side if there's enough slack. It might have identifying marks on the insulation, but I'm not sure. If you want, take some pictures and we can try to figure it out. Closeups with a ruler might work, depending on the angles and how fine of a ruler you have.
Can you tell me what the #'s mean on 6-50 and 14-50? And what is an R at the end.
R stands for "receptacle". P stands for "plug".
The second number (the 50 in your examples) is the max current supported by the outlet.
The first number... I'm not really sure. See the chart on the wikipedia page that @96s46p posted above. It shows examples of the various outlet types. it looks like 1 & 5 are for 120v outlets, and 6,10,14 are for 240v outlets. 6 has ground, 10 has neutral, and 14 has both ground and neutral.
 

kyrral

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#11
Thanks. I didn't know. My charge rate doubled to 10 miles per hour up from 5 on 110. I'll work on identifying my wires.