Wheel/Tyre Discussion

NJturtlePower

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To all wheel experts,

So, I have a non-P AWD with 18" aero OEM wheels, which I am using with my winter tires. I'm in the process of exploring the idea of purchasing a second set of wheels for non-winter seasons. I am trying to balance between efficiency and aesthetics, and am therefore considering 19" wheels, but they need to be lighter than the OEM 18" Aero. For now, let's leave out the added efficiency of 18" Aero Cap from the equation.

So far, my leading contender is VS Forged VS10 in 19x8.5; the weight of each rim/wheel should be ~20.0 lbs. For tires, I'm thinking Michelin PSS, or equivalent, in 245/40-19. The overall combination of tire/wheel should be about the same as OEM 18", I think. The tire obviously will be a bit wider. The overall wheel size diameter change will be +1.5% from the OEM 18" set-up and +1.1% from the OEM 19" set-up

Thoughts or input? Thanks in advance.
Plenty of Info Here: https://teslaownersonline.com/threads/aftermarket-tesla-model-3-wheels.5170/

I'm in the same boat as far as planning for a balance between efficiency and aesthetics in a 19" rim (square setup). Currently my plan is to run the OEM's tires till they burn up and then the Aero wheels will become my winters.

My top contenders are a few of the TSW flow forged styles (19-20lbs) and the Stance SF-03/07 styles (about 22lbs I was told).

I also like the 245/40/19 as a tire choice on a 8.5-9" rim as it adds a bit of extra contact patch and maintains some decent side wall. I plan to run an Ultra-High Performance All-Season as opposed to a true summer tire though.

https://generaltire.com/tires/performance/g-max-05
 
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I’m a early Model 3 owner who is at 25k miles. I still have 4/5 left on my tires. I’m looking at options. It seems the 19s have better options on tirerack. I feel like the Michelin’s are over priced. My focus is range and sound. Since I do 99% highway driving. I live on the central coast in California so weather isn’t a concern. I’m considering the Conti Extreme or Yokohama ADVAN sport. Any input would be appreciated. Wish I would of gone with the 19...
 

Meg

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I had a flat that was not plugable with my 19” tire.
The tire is...
The Tesla Tire 235/40R19 96W A/S CONTINENTAL PROCONTACT RX TIRE (1044255-00-A)

I purchased a “spare” at NTB (because it took 3 days to have the Tesla tire shipped to me)
It does not have the quieting foam (& yes it is noticeable for the three days I was riding on it)
The new tire at NTB: 235/40R19 96V A/S CONTINENTAL PROCONTACT TIRE. <—- notice the 96V is the difference from the Tesla tire. Price was less BUT $20 extra for the Tesla tire to have the quiet was worth it to me.
 

Mike

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I’m a early Model 3 owner who is at 25k miles. I still have 4/5 left on my tires.
Welcome to the Forum.

I'm glad to see the OEM 18" tires are lasting so long.

I have 20,000 kms on them (just installed my winter tires a week ago) and all four have 7/32", evenly across the width of each tire.
 
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I had a flat that was not plugable with my 19” tire.
The tire is...
The Tesla Tire 235/40R19 96W A/S CONTINENTAL PROCONTACT RX TIRE (1044255-00-A)

I purchased a “spare” at NTB (because it took 3 days to have the Tesla tire shipped to me)
It does not have the quieting foam (& yes it is noticeable for the three days I was riding on it)
The new tire at NTB: 235/40R19 96V A/S CONTINENTAL PROCONTACT TIRE. <—- notice the 96V is the difference from the Tesla tire. Price was less BUT $20 extra for the Tesla tire to have the quiet was worth it to me.
That’s a concern I have as well. I may end up buying some 19s and tires when my 18s are worn out then sale the 18 aero wheels.
 

350VDC

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I still have 4/5 left on my tires
Whaaat? I have 12000 miles and my back tires have about 1/5 left. Front have about 3/5. I rotated at 6000 miles and std 18" Aeros.
Yes, My foot is a little heavy but I do not drive fast or reckless, I just get up to speed limit quickly.
These tires are no good in the rain so i do not want to risk rotating again and putting the 1/5 tires on front.
i am also looking for a good recommendation to replace but get more than 12K on the new ones hopefully.
 

Mike

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Whaaat? I have 12000 miles and my back tires have about 1/5 left. Front have about 3/5. I rotated at 6000 miles and std 18" Aeros.
Yes, My foot is a little heavy but I do not drive fast or reckless, I just get up to speed limit quickly.
These tires are no good in the rain so i do not want to risk rotating again and putting the 1/5 tires on front.
i am also looking for a good recommendation to replace but get more than 12K on the new ones hopefully.
I wonder if the hot climate where you operate in may have some effect.

Prior to installing my winter tires/wheels, the OEM 18" (aeros) tires had 7/32", with even wear across all four tires, with 20,000 kms of use.
 

350VDC

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I wonder if the hot climate where you operate in may have some effect..
It could have. My previous Golf R stock tires laster 10K miles and my wifes Mercedes GLC stock tires lasted 12K miles.
It is intersting to hear that the noise level without foam insert is noticible as per @Meg. That severely limits the choices.
 
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Whaaat? I have 12000 miles and my back tires have about 1/5 left. Front have about 3/5. I rotated at 6000 miles and std 18" Aeros.
Yes, My foot is a little heavy but I do not drive fast or reckless, I just get up to speed limit quickly.
These tires are no good in the rain so i do not want to risk rotating again and putting the 1/5 tires on front.
i am also looking for a good recommendation to replace but get more than 12K on the new ones hopefully.
Well, I use Chill Mode and when accelerating with spirit I make sure I'm
not turning and not at zero mph. Tesla’s traction system can hide the true torque.
 

Thunder7ga

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Had my 3rd rotation today, and they are saying I am at about 4/32 average on them so tires are in my near future. I have the 18" aeros (without the covers) and 23k miles on the car. Knowing that EVs chew through tires more so than an ICE, this still seemed quick to me, but others have said if you get to 30k that is a lot in these cars. Who knows.

Anyway, I am thinking about new tires, and maybe even going a bit wider. The guys at Discount Tire said I could go wider, up to a 255 and it would fit fine. Not sure how much range impact that would be. May stay with the same size of tire not sure yet.

But, I am thinking about moving away from the OEM type tire and going with the MICHELIN PILOT SPORT A/S 3 PLUS. They have sizes that match the OEM (i.e. 235/45-18) as well as a 245 and 255. Tread depth new seems a bit more to maybe get some more miles out of them than OEM.

Any experiences with these? Input, other recommendations?
 

Ed Woodrick

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I don't believe that EVs go through tires more than ICE. But I do believe that it is common for EVs from the manufacturer to have harder tires, which do go through tread quicker.

The wider, the softer. the smoother, and removing the foam you go, the mileage will follow.

If you have ever pulled a suitcase through the airport, you will significantly notice the rolling resistance as you move from a hard floor to carpet.

If you find yourself never needing the range, then no problem.
 

SoFlaModel3

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I don't believe that EVs go through tires more than ICE. But I do believe that it is common for EVs from the manufacturer to have harder tires, which do go through tread quicker.

The wider, the softer. the smoother, and removing the foam you go, the mileage will follow.

If you have ever pulled a suitcase through the airport, you will significantly notice the rolling resistance as you move from a hard floor to carpet.

If you find yourself never needing the range, then no problem.
Wouldn’t harder tires last longer and softer tires shorter?
 
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Mad Hungarian

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Harder compound = longer wear, softer = shorter wear.
The only time that doesn't apply is at the track, as anyone who's tried to turn in a few quick laps on long-wearing touring tires will tell you. If pushed hard enough they will quickly overheat and start blistering or "chunking" (losing whole tread blocks) whereas a much lower wear-rated UHP tire will gobble up the laps without breaking a sweat.

As for size, unless you:

- Frequently reach the limits of your existing tires on the street
- Plan on at least occasionally hit the track
- Absolutely want the more agressive look

... or seek any combination of the above, I wouldn't bother with the extra width.
The Pilot Sport A/S 3 is an incredible tire and should offer more than enough performance for daily use in the OE size, and going wider will definitely eat into your range. Note also that increased width also reduces grip on wet and snowy surfaces (the latter I assume not normally a big deal in GA, but hey, climate change...) where you're far more likely to encounter traction limits, so be sure to weigh all the pros/cons before you go up a size.

Lastly EV's are most definitely harder on tires in the wear department, due to the prodigious amount of torque they offer and especially the instantaneous way it gets delivered. It's so much of an issue that tire manufacturers are starting to develop new tread designs to cope specifically with this. It's obviously in its infancy but as EV adoption rates skyrocket I suspect we'll see this design strategy spread across more and more models.
 

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The manual and post on the Model 3 performance say 41 lbs, but I don't think it's enough. I hit a couple of potholes this winter with the stock 20" performance rims, (401 in Toronto) and destroyed one tire, and bent two rims. One of the potholes wasn't very big, and I wasn't going fast, so I don't think it should have bent, but it did. The replacements are $CAD 890, which times two, plus installation, is enough to buy a new set of winter rims. Anyways, when I got the first rim replace, Tesla inflated all tires to 45 lbs. If I had them all at 45 lbs. in the first place, I may have avoided replacing two rims. Moving forward, I'm going to keep them at at least 45 lbs. Also, if you are thinking about using the 20" wheels in the winter in a similar environment, I would re-think, and consider smaller rims.
 

scaots

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Harder compound = longer wear, softer = shorter wear.
The only time that doesn't apply is at the track, as anyone who's tried to turn in a few quick laps on long-wearing touring tires will tell you. If pushed hard enough they will quickly overheat and start blistering or "chunking" (losing whole tread blocks) whereas a much lower wear-rated UHP tire will gobble up the laps without breaking a sweat.

As for size, unless you:

- Frequently reach the limits of your existing tires on the street
- Plan on at least occasionally hit the track
- Absolutely want the more agressive look

... or seek any combination of the above, I wouldn't bother with the extra width.
The Pilot Sport A/S 3 is an incredible tire and should offer more than enough performance for daily use in the OE size, and going wider will definitely eat into your range. Note also that increased width also reduces grip on wet and snowy surfaces (the latter I assume not normally a big deal in GA, but hey, climate change...) where you're far more likely to encounter traction limits, so be sure to weigh all the pros/cons before you go up a size.

Lastly EV's are most definitely harder on tires in the wear department, due to the prodigious amount of torque they offer and especially the instantaneous way it gets delivered. It's so much of an issue that tire manufacturers are starting to develop new tread designs to cope specifically with this. It's obviously in its infancy but as EV adoption rates skyrocket I suspect we'll see this design strategy spread across more and more models.
@Mad Hungarian How did you like those Continental PureContact? I think you were trying those on your road trip? Were they the LS or the old ones? I will probably replace my 18s with the purecontact LS but they aren't XL load rated. Any worries on the load rating for normal driving? I am probably near rated weight capacity occasionally on trips.
 

shareef777

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I don’t see how 4lbs would of prevented damage. 20” wheels with low profile sport/summer tires will always be susceptible to damage in winters (I know as I had a similar issue with my old Accord that had 19” wheels). My plan is to get 18” winter wheels/tires for the Tesla. Just need to find a set of wheels that’ll fit around the Performance brakes.
 
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The manual and post on the Model 3 performance say 41 lbs, but I don't think it's enough. I hit a couple of potholes this winter with the stock 20" performance rims, (401 in Toronto) and destroyed one tire, and bent two rims. One of the potholes wasn't very big, and I wasn't going fast, so I don't think it should have bent, but it did. The replacements are $CAD 890, which times two, plus installation, is enough to buy a new set of winter rims. Anyways, when I got the first rim replace, Tesla inflated all tires to 45 lbs. If I had them all at 45 lbs. in the first place, I may have avoided replacing two rims. Moving forward, I'm going to keep them at at least 45 lbs. Also, if you are thinking about using the 20" wheels in the winter in a similar environment, I would re-think, and consider smaller rims.
The 20" rims and 35 series tires are way too low for the winter. Even in the summer it's an issue.

I think Tesla went too low across the board. The P3D should have a 40 series tire, the 19" rims 45 series, and base 18s 50 series tires. This would really help those who live up north where there are larger pot holes from the freeze/thaw.

This would also give you the option to go wider and lower if more grip is what you need. But with how low the tires are now, it's not a great option.
 

Mad Hungarian

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@Mad Hungarian How did you like those Continental PureContact? I think you were trying those on your road trip? Were they the LS or the old ones? I will probably replace my 18s with the purecontact LS but they aren't XL load rated. Any worries on the load rating for normal driving? I am probably near rated weight capacity occasionally on trips.
Mine are the previous generation.
Overall I find they do an excellent job at delivering exactly what they promise: good, predictable grip in just about any kind of weather with a smooth ride and low rolling resistance. They're fun to toss around at 7 or 8 tenths but not big on hanging out at the limits, which is perfectly fine as they aren't really meant to be. A spirited/agressive driver will prefer its more athletic cousin, the DWS06.
As it doesn't have the Severe Snow Service rating (mountain snowflake) it clearly isn't designed to offer winter tire level performance on snow or ice but I remain steadfastly impressed at their ability to get around in such conditions.
My only real complaint was that I found them a bit on the noisy side, but that's apparently been addressed in the new LS gen with Conti claiming a 50% reduction in noise, which should make a huge difference.

As for the XL vs non-XL, this isn't an issue for the Model 3, it only needs 1385 lbs of load carrying capacity per tire to pass the rear GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating).
Even the non-XL 235/45R18 offers 1477 lbs of capacity at max pressure.
For comparison the 92 XL load index of the 20" OE tire on the P cars offers a just-over-the-mark capacity of 1389 lbs, but Tesla is clearly OK with that. Knowing this though helps one understand why it's REALLY important to keep those pressures up if you're rolling 20's.
 

scaots

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Mine are the previous generation.
Overall I find they do an excellent job at delivering exactly what they promise: good, predictable grip in just about any kind of weather with a smooth ride and low rolling resistance. They're fun to toss around at 7 or 8 tenths but not big on hanging out at the limits, which is perfectly fine as they aren't really meant to be. A spirited/agressive driver will prefer its more athletic cousin, the DWS06.
As it doesn't have the Severe Snow Service rating (mountain snowflake) it clearly isn't designed to offer winter tire level performance on snow or ice but I remain steadfastly impressed at their ability to get around in such conditions.
My only real complaint was that I found them a bit on the noisy side, but that's apparently been addressed in the new LS gen with Conti claiming a 50% reduction in noise, which should make a huge difference.

As for the XL vs non-XL, this isn't an issue for the Model 3, it only needs 1385 lbs of load carrying capacity per tire to pass the rear GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating).
Even the non-XL 235/45R18 offers 1477 lbs of capacity at max pressure.
For comparison the 92 XL load index of the 20" OE tire on the P cars offers a just-over-the-mark capacity of 1389 lbs, but Tesla is clearly OK with that. Knowing this though helps one understand why it's REALLY important to keep those pressures up if you're rolling 20's.
Thanks for the excellent information! That confirms the LS for my next set. I was originally looking at the DWS but decided that the touring version was better for my driving for efficiency, longevity, and comfort.