WHAT'S YOUR SAFETY SCORE?

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What’s your score?

  • 100

    Votes: 25 20.5%
  • 99

    Votes: 35 28.7%
  • 98

    Votes: 20 16.4%
  • 97

    Votes: 4 3.3%
  • 96

    Votes: 6 4.9%
  • 95

    Votes: 8 6.6%
  • 94

    Votes: 4 3.3%
  • 93

    Votes: 4 3.3%
  • 92

    Votes: 1 0.8%
  • 91

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 90

    Votes: 5 4.1%
  • 80-89

    Votes: 7 5.7%
  • 70-79

    Votes: 2 1.6%
  • 60-69

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • < 60

    Votes: 1 0.8%

  • Total voters
    122

Bigriver

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@NightStorm, the forward collision warnings are not dinging your unsafe following score.

Unsafe following is the only component that I had some trouble with. The problem is that is is a ratio of how often you are within 1 sec of the car in front of you (bad) to within 1 to 3 seconds of the car in front of you (good). All the time that you stay way back (> 3 sec, very good) does not factor into the calculation at all. It also does not consider when you are on autopilot and it doesn’t count when you are under 50 mph. A single occurrence of being within 1 sec of the car in front of you when going over 50 mph can give you a very bad score if it didn’t have any instance of you within 1 to 3 sec when over 50 mph.

So stay on autopilot any time you are going more than 50 mph and your new drives will stop getting dings to the unsafe following component. Or, rather than staying way back, try to be 2 to 3 seconds behind the car in front. I spent a lot of time counting, trying to gauge exactly where this was, and it’s not easy! I recommend the stay on autopilot option.
C40901F2-D663-40F9-BC07-1BC832AD996E.jpeg
 

Tombolian

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@NightStorm, the forward collision warnings are not dinging your unsafe following score.

Unsafe following is the only component that I had some trouble with. The problem is that is is a ratio of how often you are within 1 sec of the car in front of you (bad) to within 1 to 3 seconds of the car in front of you (good). All the time that you stay way back (> 3 sec, very good) does not factor into the calculation at all. It also does not consider when you are on autopilot and it doesn’t count when you are under 50 mph. A single occurrence of being within 1 sec of the car in front of you when going over 50 mph can give you a very bad score if it didn’t have any instance of you within 1 to 3 sec when over 50 mph.

So stay on autopilot any time you are going more than 50 mph and your new drives will stop getting dings to the unsafe following component. Or, rather than staying way back, try to be 2 to 3 seconds behind the car in front. I spent a lot of time counting, trying to gauge exactly where this was, and it’s not easy! I recommend the stay on autopilot option.
View attachment 40518
Up kinda early? I see what you did there...😉
 

rickleemodel3

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I have done some searching about this and can't find anything. Tesla says the Safety Score excludes events that occur when Autopilot is engaged. But just a few days ago, I did a 225 mile roadtrip, 95% of which was highway and with Autopilot engaged. I paid special attention to braking and following because that is where I tend to get dinged when not on autopilot (although my manual SS was 97% in October). At the end of that trip, I had a 95% SS and the ONLY events that I experienced were on AP. So either something is wrong with my AP or something is BS about the exclusions. Anyone else run into this?
 
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littlD

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From my experience of scoring 100 with 832 miles, I always:

1. Set following distance to at least 4 so when I had to disengage AP I'd already have plenty of room
2. More over a lane anticipating someone merging in
3. Let regen braking do all the braking unless unsafe
4. Anticipate yellow lights, even when using Traffic Light / Stop Sign control
5. Use AP whenever the car allows it, not just on highways

I'm already hearing the many voices who are screaming at my post "But that's what I did".

I can only share what worked for me, and that my driving was in Fishers, IN (North Indianapolis Metro Area) and I-69.
 

NightStorm

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I have done some searching about this and can't find anything. Tesla says the Safety Score excludes events that occur when Autopilot is engaged. But just a few days ago, I did a 225 mile roadtrip, 95% of which was highway and with Autopilot engaged. I paid special attention to braking and following because that is where I tend to get dinged when not on autopilot (although my manual SS was 97% in October). At the end of that trip, I had a 95% SS and the ONLY events that I experienced were on AP. So either something is wrong with my AP or something is BS about the exclusions. Anyone else run into this?
My totally unscientific evidence points to the same. I was at 100% until I started using autopilot. Much of my driving is backroads to get to the highway where I engage autopilot. Not a lot of opportunity for errors on the backroads.
 
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BobR

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I have a score of 97 due to "close following" over the past week since I started I have used Cruise control thinking this would allow for proper distancing. I was wrong, despite the continuous use my score has only moved 1 point up. What distance between cars does the score depend on and why doesn't the cruise determine the proper distance. This does not make much sense.
I would appreciate any comments on this.
Thank you
Bob
 
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Kizzy

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I have a score of 97 due to "close following" over the past week since I started I have used Cruise control thinking this would allow for proper distancing. I was wrong, despite the continuous use my score has only moved 1 point up. What distance between cars does the score depend on and why doesn't the cruise determine the proper distance. This does not make much sense.
I would appreciate any comments on this.
Thank you
Bob
You need to be close (within 3 seconds) but not too close (less than 2 seconds?) to improve close following distance scoring if you got too close to a car during the trip. It’s super counterintuitive that keeping further away doesn’t count in the measurement—but if you never get close to another car, you never get dinged.

It takes a while to improve overall score with 100 score drives. Are you still getting close following distance dings?
 
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Stats App

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I have a score of 97 due to "close following" over the past week since I started I have used Cruise control thinking this would allow for proper distancing. I was wrong, despite the continuous use my score has only moved 1 point up. What distance between cars does the score depend on and why doesn't the cruise determine the proper distance. This does not make much sense.
I would appreciate any comments on this.
Thank you
Bob
The algorithm is very sensitive to "following closely". If you have the Stats app, tap on the "Safety Score" button in the app to see information related to how many miles you need to drive to get to the next score. Currently, you need a minimum score of 98 to get the beta (I saw someone reported getting FSD with 97, but that's rare). Good luck. I am at 98 and waiting.

1642009534084.png
 

MJJ

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I have a score of 97 due to "close following" over the past week since I started I have used Cruise control thinking this would allow for proper distancing. I was wrong, despite the continuous use my score has only moved 1 point up. What distance between cars does the score depend on and why doesn't the cruise determine the proper distance. This does not make much sense.
I would appreciate any comments on this.
Thank you
Bob
I believe it is generally accepted that events occurring while the car is “driving” (so, TACC, NoA, etc) do not count against your score. It’s gotta be something else.

I struggled for a while with following distance dings too. Finally I decided that my inclination to accelerate while changing lanes to pass was the culprit. If you notice, AP moves sideways first into a passing lane, then accelerates. My way was bringing me too close to the vehicle ahead while the car still considered us to be in the same lane.
 
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NR4P

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I have a score of 97 due to "close following" over the past week since I started I have used Cruise control thinking this would allow for proper distancing. I was wrong, despite the continuous use my score has only moved 1 point up. What distance between cars does the score depend on and why doesn't the cruise determine the proper distance. This does not make much sense.
I would appreciate any comments on this.
Thank you
Bob
Short answers. Use AP not just TACC. And, go to your AP following distance settings. Make it 5, 6 or 7. Yes people will cut in front of you but you will avoid dings. And if you are on a 50 mph road, lock in at 49mph, not 50 or higher. Following too close is only at 50mph or higher.

And it will take weeks to move up to 100 if that's your goal.
 

LastGas

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So stay on autopilot any time you are going more than 50 mph and your new drives will stop getting dings to the unsafe following component. Or, rather than staying way back, try to be 2 to 3 seconds behind the car in front. I spent a lot of time counting, trying to gauge exactly where this was, and it’s not easy! I recommend the stay on autopilot option.
That's sure advice for ruining your score. Been there, done that.

Unsafe following is a ratio. A good score requires a small number on top and a big number on the bottom. When you turn on Autopilot you indeed remove close following events, but you accumulate zero safe following too. What happens in practice is that with Autopilot on, you inevitably disengage Autopilot for a moment to do something and there is a brief bit of unsafe following. That little bit is amplified because the divisor is close to zero.

I turned Autopilot off and my score went from the 80's to 100 every time. I got the FSD Beta December 25.
 

Bigriver

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@LastGas, I got FSD Beta in October, the first week it was open to people based on safety scores. It has been months since I even thought about the safety score. I had driven over 4000 miles during that first scoring period, achieving the 100 score to get FSD Beta. So likewise I guess I can say, been there, done that.

My advice was that I found it easier to stay on autopilot when over 50 mph and never even get any close following dings. That will not ruin a score. It avoids the numerator and denominator game, which I do understand (and I think that my post that you referenced explained quite well. 😏)

I guess that you are saying you had a problem with autopilot deactivating while going over 50 mph. I had a few deactivations as someone might cut over in front of me, but it was not frequent. I agree, that if that happens and you are within 1 sec of the car in front of you after the 3 second grace period, then you need some time off autopilot to rack up 1-3 sec following distances. As I had said, I found it hard to find that 1 to 3 seconds notch, as I usually travel more than 3 seconds behind the car in front of me. For me autopilot helped avoid this part of the game and kept the score high.

Congratulations on joining FSD Beta.
 
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LastGas

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@LastGas, I got FSD Beta in October, the first week it was open to people based on safety scores. It has been months since I even thought about the safety score. I had driven over 4000 miles during that first scoring period, achieving the 100 score to get FSD Beta. So likewise I guess I can say, been there, done that.

My advice was that I found it easier to stay on autopilot when over 50 mph and never even get any close following dings. That will not ruin a score. It avoids the numerator and denominator game, which I do understand (and I think that my post that you referenced explained quite well. 😏)
As far as the safety score is concerned, when Autopilot is on, you're not driving. That means that all the "easy driving" where you would normally use Autopilot doesn't help your score or influence the percentage. You're only graded when Autopilot is off. And Autopilot is off typically in more difficult situations. Tesla is quite specific on this (https://www.tesla.com/support/safety-score):

The percentage shown in the app is the percentage of manual braking that is done with excessive force when driving and Autopilot is not engaged.
Aggressive turning while on Autopilot is not factored into the Safety Score formula. The percentage shown in the app is the percentage of turning that is done with excessive force when driving and Autopilot is not engaged.
Unsafe following while on Autopilot is not factored into the Safety Score formula. The percentage shown in the app is the percentage of unsafe following when driving and Autopilot is not engaged.
Driving on Autopilot (including 3 seconds after Autopilot is disengaged) will not be factored into the Safety Score formula

My first drive for the Safety Score was 70 miles on rural highways on a Sunday afternoon, with virtually no traffic. I drove carefully and mildly. Autopilot was on at every opportunity. The score was crushed for hard braking. That's because the only time I was driving was when I had to slow down from 55 to 35 mph going through small towns. My score was 87.

I tried using Autopilot on highways with traffic carefully counting seconds to stay in the sweet spot between 1 and 3 seconds, totally wasting my time because as Tesla says on the Safety Score page, time on Autopilot doesn't count. So when someone cuts in front of me and I brake, or I'm in the wrong lane and I have to squeeze in to make an exit, that's all that counts in the score, not the 100 miles on Autopilot following safely,

I can't explain your good scores, but when I turned Autopilot off, my close following totally went away, the percentage of hard braking evaporated and every drive became 100.
 
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Bigriver

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I drove carefully and mildly. Autopilot was on at every opportunity. The score was crushed for hard braking. That's because the only time I was driving was when I had to slow down from 55 to 35 mph going through small towns.
I often drive roads similar to that. Autopilot will auto dial down the speed for those small towns, so I remain on autopilot while driving through them. If for some reason the car wasn’t slowing down fast enough, I dial down the max speed, which prior to FSD Beta, used to work great to slow the car quickly.
because as Tesla says on the Safety Score page, time on Autopilot doesn't count.
Incidents on autopilot don’t factor into the safety score, but the miles do. So autopilot allows you to rack up lots of error free miles with no dings against the safety score. Yes, if you have an incident (while not on autopilot) and need a ratio, then you have to do that without autopilot. But if you never have a problem in the numerator, there is no need to build up good karma in the denominator.

So when someone cuts in front of me and I brake, or I'm in the wrong lane and I have to squeeze in to make an exit, that's all that counts in the score, not the 100 miles on Autopilot following safely,
I had several instances like that which I thought would give me a hard brake ding, but they did not. I think the 3 second grace period after autopilot deactivates is meant to cover these situations, and they did for me. I am only recalling one hard braking ding I got and it was on my first drive when the scoring started, which calibrated me to how touchy that metric was. Another reason I wanted to be on autopilot, to let the car do as much of the braking as possible (which is much harder/abrupt than I do).

It’s been interesting to me to hear more of your perspective of why autopilot was a hindrance to your safety score. Indeed, it does not let you log what it considers positive behaviors to counterbalance what it considers bad behaviors.
 
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LastGas

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It’s been interesting to me to hear more of your perspective of why autopilot was a hindrance to your safety score. Indeed, it does not let you log what it considers positive behaviors to counterbalance what it considers bad behaviors.
In addition to the Safety Score, I also participate in the State Farm Insurance "Drive Safe and Save" program that uses an accelerometer to measure some of the same points Tesla does (but not unsafe following, and it counts speeding, which Tesla inexplicably doesn't). The nice thing about DS&S is that after the drive, they show you a map labeled with the exact location of each safety event.

On my initial 70-mile disaster DS&S showed that the hard braking was invariably in places where there were 55 mph to 35 mph transitions. While you can dial down Autopilot speed, it's not fast.
 

JasonF

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In addition to the Safety Score, I also participate in the State Farm Insurance "Drive Safe and Save" program that uses an accelerometer to measure some of the same points Tesla does (but not unsafe following, and it counts speeding, which Tesla inexplicably doesn't). The nice thing about DS&S is that after the drive, they show you a map labeled with the exact location of each safety event.

On my initial 70-mile disaster DS&S showed that the hard braking was invariably in places where there were 55 mph to 35 mph transitions. While you can dial down Autopilot speed, it's not fast.

I removed the accelerometer from my car because I thought the behavior patterns it detects were averaged out, but they're not. Electric acceleration has too much torque for it unless you use "hypermile style" and crawl at the slowest speed increase you possibly can, and you have to set regen to "low" because "standard" regen is braking too hard. And it counts up every time you're even 1 mph above the speed limit, so you have to drive under the speed limit all the time to avoid that.

That's all fine, it's what I would expect computer software with strict parameters to do. But then it sends you an email threatening that if you continue your bad behavior, it will impact your insurance rate, and has "suggestions" on what to improve and how many days you have to do it before your rate changes. After that I put the accelerometer in a drawer in my desk. It's not even making anyone a safer driver, it's just punishing people who aren't going to great lengths to game the system and avoid a rate increase.
 

LastGas

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I had to chuckle when I saw my first "safety score" from yesterday. It gave me a red 46.1% for "unsafe following." Evidently the scoring factors can't tell when one is in a bumper-to-bumper traffic jam on the freeway, inching along at 2 mph on Autopilot, for nearly an hour, because of a horrible wreck more than 2 miles up ahead.
Unsafe following is only counted when a) you are not using autopilot and b) you're traveling at or greater than 50 mph. So that's not where your bad score came from.
More likely you had Autopilot on all the time except for a brief regular speed bit when you were close and it divided 10 seconds of unsafe following by 20 seconds of safe following and you got hammered.
 
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LastGas

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I removed the accelerometer from my car because I thought the behavior patterns it detects were averaged out, but they're not. Electric acceleration has too much torque for it unless you use "hypermile style" and crawl at the slowest speed increase you possibly can, and you have to set regen to "low" because "standard" regen is braking too hard. And it counts up every time you're even 1 mph above the speed limit, so you have to drive under the speed limit all the time to avoid that.
I consistently score between 85 and 92 on the State Farm app, using Autopilot almost all the time. Hard braking is still my weakness. But I got $150 off my last 6-month premium, so life is good.