What charger to get for Model 3?

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scott franco

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#1
I want to charge the M3 *AT MAXIMUM FOR HOUSEHOLD*. I don't have limits on household power. I can do up to 100amps. Is the 48 AMP Tesla charger the max? On the Tesla page it only shows options for MS and MX for that charger.

Thanks in advance.
 

MelindaV

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#2
I want to charge the M3 *AT MAXIMUM FOR HOUSEHOLD*. I don't have limits on household power. I can do up to 100amps. Is the 48 AMP Tesla charger the max? On the Tesla page it only shows options for MS and MX for that charger.

Thanks in advance.
yes, so highest usable would be a Wall connector using a 60A/220V circuit (for the 48A)

(for the long range battery)
 

SoFlaModel3

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#3
I want to charge the M3 *AT MAXIMUM FOR HOUSEHOLD*. I don't have limits on household power. I can do up to 100amps. Is the 48 AMP Tesla charger the max? On the Tesla page it only shows options for MS and MX for that charger.

Thanks in advance.
Scott the car comes with the next gen UMC and a Nema 14-50 connection. Using that out of the box and installing a Nema 14-50 will provide a charge rate of 30 miles of range per hour. I drive a lot (70-75 miles/day) and doing the simply math at worst I’m charging for 2.5 hours a day. I would say 99% of people don’t need more than that.
 

BigBri

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#4
Usually you just size it to whatever your overnight charge window would be. It's tempting to want to max it but thats also hard on the utility grid and would cause large spikes if everyone did that.

I got the Juicebox Pro as I've also got a Leaf and been very happy with it. I like that it tracks my lifetime usage and I can set schedules (as my Leaf doesn't have scheduled charging).
 

garsh

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#5
Usually you just size it to whatever your overnight charge window would be. It's tempting to want to max it but thats also hard on the utility grid and would cause large spikes if everyone did that.
I'm going to have to respectfully disagree. :)

Maxing it is fine. It will not result in any sort of trouble for the grid. On the contrary, electric companies would love it if they could convince more people to shift their peak usage to be overnight. And we're a long, long way from having too many people doing this. Even when electric vehicles start becoming popular, not everyone will opt to install 60 amp circuits. The load will still be spread out quite a bit.

Faster charging can make an electric car more useful. I lived with 120v/12a charging for 5 years. I recently installed a 240v/16a charger. I used to get home from work, and not be able to use the Leaf again until it charged overnight. Now I can get home with a low battery, let the car charge for a half hour, and get enough juice in that time to use my Leaf for another errand.

So, if you don't mind spending the money, I think it's worthwhile to install the fastest charging available.
 

scott franco

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#6
So far in searching around the internet I get two opinions, one that the M3 can do 40A, and the other that it can do the full 48A. They are all from last year, and I haven't found any hard specifications.

It does all lead to the same Tesla charger, which is quite reasonable at $500. Seems like no way the M3 is going to do 72A (the higher power unit). I guess the other possibility would be that Tesla will introduce a new charger, which I have also found reference to.

I already have a 6.6kw charger and have for years, I have gone through a leaf, a Smart EV, a Spark and a Bolt. The attraction of the Tesla EVSE is to be able to charge both my cars at once, and to max out Tesla charging, which seems to be 11kw at 48A, IE, almost double the 6.6kw charger.
 
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ahagge

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#7
As another LEAF owner, I'd have to agree with garsh - if you can afford to max it, you might as well do so. Who knows what the next-gen electrics might offer?

As for hardware, the best I'm aware of are the Tesla Wall Connector (Tesla-specific), which can be used with up to a 90 amp breaker (72 amps going into the vehicle) and the JuiceBox Pro 75, which I think needs a 100 amp breaker to supply the vehicle with 75 amps (and uses a standard J1772 connector). There are likely others, but once you get above about 60 amps, they're fewer and further between.

But be aware that the Model 3 can only take 48 amps max, no matter how big your EVSE is. The onboard inverter is the limiting factor.
 

LUXMAN

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#8
Scott the car comes with the next gen UMC and a Nema 14-50 connection. Using that out of the box and installing a Nema 14-50 will provide a charge rate of 30 miles of range per hour. I drive a lot (70-75 miles/day) and doing the simply math at worst I’m charging for 2.5 hours a day. I would say 99% of people don’t need more than that.
Scott, I have to agree with @SoFlaModel3 . I have a 30 Amp unit (on a 60 amp circuit) from Aerovironment that I use with my Leaf. It does double duty for the Model 3 as well. It provides 7kw of power for a rate of 27-30 miles per hour of charge. I get the idea that faster is better but unless you are someone who drives a couple hundred miles a day out and back several times a day from your house, it really isn't needed. If you had the max rating of 48 amps on a 240 circuit, you are looking at 11.5kW per hour or adding about 40 miles an hour of charge. That's great, but over 10 hours at home, it will make no difference. Now I was gonna say except for the cost but at $500, the Tesla Wall charger is a steal! So if you got the amps available and are looking to max it out, I would go with that.
Personally, if the Leaf goes away and the current unit I have quits (I had a GE unit burn up 2 weeks after the 3 year warranty ended), then I plan on just using the included 32 amp UMC as I find it fast enough for me.

EDIT to add Pics
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LUXMAN

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#9
So far in searching around the internet I get two opinions, one that the M3 can do 40A, and the other that it can do the full 48A. They are all from last year, and I haven't found any hard specifications.
The Model 3 LONG RANGE will take up to 48 amps on Level 2
 

garsh

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#10
So far in searching around the internet I get two opinions, one that the M3 can do 40A, and the other that it can do the full 48A.
Let's get this out of the way first:
M3 =

T3 =

Model 3 =
DC charging at superchargers can go really high. So here we're only talking about AC charging.

The Long Range 3's on-board charger maxes out at 48 amps. In order to supply that, you'll need to install a Tesla Wall Connector on a 60 amp or larger circuit.

The Mobile Connector that is included with all 3s is only capable of supplying 32 amps when plugged into a 14-50 outlet. This is also apparently the maximum current that the Standard Range 3's on-board charger is capable of accepting.

The Old Mobile Connector that was included with the S and X is capable of supplying 40 amps when plugged into a 14-50 outlet. That's also the maximum sustained current that is supported by a 14-50 outlet.
 

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#11
I ordered and received from Tesla, a 14-30 adapter, for the new mobile connector. I currently have a Clipper Creek 14-30 that I used to charge my now returned, leased i3. From what it sounds like, the 14-30 setup will be fine since I have a very short commute daily and only drive to any appreciable distance only on the weekend. I plan to put the Clipper Creek along with the J1772 adapter in the 3 as a spare and keep the new mobile connector plugged in 24/7.
 

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#12
If you plan on keeping your car a long time or staying in the Tesla family, the HPWC seems like a great value. $500 for never having to unpack and pack up the UMC at home and you get the advantage of a 48A draw instead of 32A. Bonus: It looks great.
 

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#13
If you plan on keeping your car a long time or staying in the Tesla family, the HPWC seems like a great value. $500 for never having to unpack and pack up the UMC at home and you get the advantage of a 48A draw instead of 32A. Bonus: It looks great.
This. I have two wall chargers in my garage, configured to share the same 100 amp circuit. They look great and I never have to take the mobile connector out of the trunk when I'm at home. On those occasions when I need a fast turnaround on my Model S, I can dial the charge rate up to 80 amps but most of the time, the 3 and the S are both plugged in to their respective wall chargers and the charger sharing protocol ensures that both cars are charged when I need them.
 

LUXMAN

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#14
...the same 100 amp circuit. ..... I can dial the charge rate up to 80 amps ... the charger sharing protocol ensures that both cars are charged when I need them.
So no problems using both at the same time if set to say 40 Amps? What are they set to? I ask in case I upgrade another ICE :confused:
Is this an easy access item or do have to open the unit to get to the selector?
Can you explain this protocol? IS this between the 2 chargers? are they linked?
 

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#15
So no problems using both at the same time if set to say 40 Amps?
When you get up to these high currents, electrical codes generally want each device on a separate circuit. So if you have a 100 amp circuit (which supports 80 amps continuous draw) going to your garage, and you want to install two wall connectors limited to 40 amps each, then the best thing to do would be to install a 100 amp sub-panel in the garage, and have two 50 amp circuits going from the subpanel to each wall connector.
Can you explain this protocol? IS this between the 2 chargers? are they linked?
The new Tesla Wall Connectors are able to be linked together, so that up to four of them can intelligently share a single circuit. This allows one of them to draw the full 80 amps when needed, or have each of the four draw only 20 amps if they're all charging cars at the same time (or if you have two, each will draw only 40 amps). It does require a secondary "signalling" connection between each of the wall connectors. I don't know what the protocol is - the installation manual doesn't say (see Appendix B in the manual for the details it does provide).
 
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scott franco

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#16
Yea, I am not a fan of chaining chargers. The total cost to me of running a separate drop from my garage panel to the sidewall, including a new breaker, is less than $100, mainly due to the copper cable (required where I live in CA). The total load for both my chargers is less than 100A. If it were greater, and I really anticipated charging two cars at once at more than 100A, then I'd just call the power company. Despite what you have heard, they still enjoy immensely getting calls like "I need more power". This is all, of course, providing you are not paying a rip-off electrician for the work (I don't believe in paying people to work who are stupider than I am, a low bar I know).
 

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#17
Scott don't forget to see what kind of incentives you may have available. LA DWP has a $500 rebate that I plan on using to pay for the $500 Tesla Wall Connector I just had installed. Nice how that worked out.