Views from Model 3 production

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Daniel D.

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#3
Are stamping presses typically the fastest production machine in a car factory? At that rate, it looks like it could produce thousands of stampings a day.
 

MelindaV

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#4
But the line would need 10s of thousands (100s of thousands?) a day to keep up. Each body panel is made up of multiple stamped parts, plus everything that makes up the frame. Guesses on total stamped parts per car? I would say 300ish.

Using the end of this years goal of 5000 production per week and 300 stamps per car, that would mean they would need to keep up with 214,300 stamps per day, 7 days a week to maintain 5000 cars produced a week. Or 149 stamps per minute 24/7.
Double that for next years end of year goal.
 
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Joe Donahue

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#5
I would imagine that they have more than one stamper for different parts so that they don't have to swap out molds, but that's just a guess. I know absolutely nothing about car manufacturing.

Just doing a quick look at that video, it seems to be doing roughly one stamp every 3 seconds. So that's 20 stamps a minute, 1200 stamps an hour, and obviously however many stamps a day would depend on however many hours it runs. It would be around 28,800 if it runs 24 hours a day, but I doubt it does...again, could be wrong

So the biggest unknown is whether or not there are other stampers for other parts. The stamping process on that machine as is looks pretty incredibly precise with how little space is between the arms and the press on the way in and the way out. I don't really see potential for it getting much more efficient than it already is. The only room I can see for speeding things up at all would be if the speed of the press itself was increased, but I would imagine that there would be some inherent dangers in that.

I guess we shall see. It's really cool to get a better glimpse of the process either way.
 

Model34mePlease

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#7
I would imagine that they have more than one stamper for different parts so that they don't have to swap out molds, but that's just a guess. I know absolutely nothing about car manufacturing.

Just doing a quick look at that video, it seems to be doing roughly one stamp every 3 seconds. So that's 20 stamps a minute, 1200 stamps an hour, and obviously however many stamps a day would depend on however many hours it runs. It would be around 28,800 if it runs 24 hours a day, but I doubt it does...again, could be wrong

So the biggest unknown is whether or not there are other stampers for other parts. The stamping process on that machine as is looks pretty incredibly precise with how little space is between the arms and the press on the way in and the way out. I don't really see potential for it getting much more efficient than it already is. The only room I can see for speeding things up at all would be if the speed of the press itself was increased, but I would imagine that there would be some inherent dangers in that.

I guess we shall see. It's really cool to get a better glimpse of the process either way.
Humans have very poor intuition for how fast mechanical processes can be made to run.
 

Frank99

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#8
I don't know how many stamping presses Fremont has. This article:
http://www.businessinsider.com/tesl...r-stamping-out-teslas-aluminum-body-panels-17
implies that there was one for Model S/X production, and this article:
https://electrek.co/2017/04/21/tesla-model-3-production-line-automated-robot-snake-supercharger/
shows a line of what looks like four presses - whether they can stamp four different parts simultaneously, or are set up to do four different stamping operations on the same part, I don't know. It also discusses building permits for the Model 3 line.
And an interesting Tesla Video on the subject:
 

JWardell

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#9
While one stamp is required for each large panel, the majority of those "maybe 300" stamped parts are formed from one stamp on one panel forming a dozen or more parts that are broken off of it. Have a look around for some of the BMW production videos that show the process.

Still, I have never seen a stamp move so fast.
 

Steam613

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#10
Humans have very poor intuition for how fast mechanical processes can be made to run.
Per humans I have talked to the speed is limited most by the force to obtain inertia.
upload_2017-10-15_7-59-45-png.3788

To move an object from rest to motion requires a force. The limit on moving the metal to and from the stamp is only limited by first; a limit of the tensile strength of the object; or to say that moving it too quickly from point A to B causes deformation of the panel from source to stamp or from stamp to storage. Or secondly, (and most likely the limiter) more force than can be controlled by the moving arm. It seems some form of suction is used to move the panels and the number of pick up points on the receiving arm is far fewer due to contours of the stamped piece. Yeah?