Tesla Model S/X/3 range at 55/60/65/70/75/80 mph

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Amazing, detailed work. Thank you so much for doing this. One small concern though:
For #2, I used 4.4% based on the video here. In addition, in 2012 Tesla released aero covers for the Model S and many people were reporting 5% or more range improvement which is another data point that shows the aero covers work. Btw, Tesla has a blog post here that mentions the effect of wheel size on range.
Impact of wheels / tires on efficiency comes from two main sources.
1. Rolling resistance, which is more or less a constant force at all speeds. i.e. approx. constant joules (watt-hour) per mile at all speeds. Rolling resistance depends on the tire design, and everything else equal, is higher for low-profile, high performance tires
2. Aerodynamic resistance, which as everything else aerodynamic, is correlated to the power of speed.

The aero covers clearly only impact aerodynamics. Therefore, whatever correction factor you use for the covers should be correlated to (speed ^ 2), vs. a constant 4.4%
 

Troy

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FRC

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Hi, everybody. There is a new version of the range table but it has now moved to here: https://teslike.com/range/

Also, check out my new blog post here which explains this latest change:
https://teslike.com/2018/12/06/model-3-mid-range-has-251-miles-highway-range-according-to-epa/

For the record, here the old versions:
miles
km

@ahmadr, I implemented your suggested about Aero covers having a more positive effect at higher speeds.
What is the 30 min. supercharger range and what assumptions are used in determining this number?
 

Feathermerchant

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Since you have calculated these for us (Thanks!) would you consider doing requests?
Ex: I'm about to bolt on some non Aero 18" wheels with (lets assume) standard 18" tires. What could I expect to see if such a combo existed on the chart?
I have a Model 3 performance with the performance brakes and 20" wheels.
 

Troy

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SR vs SR+ battery

@TrevP and team were talking about this topic in the video here. I want to add some comments about this. Based on my calculation, the Model 3 Standard Range battery pack with 2796 cells they were planning for a long time can achieve 240 miles EPA rated range.

According to the leaked information in this article from Aug 2017, the SR pack has 2796 cells compared to 4416 for LR. 4416 for LR turned out to be correct. Therefore 2976 cells for SR is likely correct too. Using Model 3 LRs EPA score from 2017 and the two cell counts and the fact that the SR will be lighter than LR, I'm calculating that 240 miles EPA rated range for SR is possible. Therefore, they don't need a new pack design. There are two options:

Option 1: Both packs would have the same number of cells but the $35K's pack would be software limited.
Option 2: They could remove some cells from the SR pack and use it for the $35K version.
 
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garsh

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Using Model 3 LRs EPA score from 2017 and the two cell counts and the fact that the SR will be lighter than LR, I'm calculating that 240 miles EPA rated range for SR is possible. Therefore, they don't need a new pack design.
Elon has tweeted in the past that they needed to come up with a new design for the SR battery pack because the LR pack was too complicated and costly to manufacture, and wouldn't allow them to release the $35k version of the car. It'll be interesting to find out what design changes they ended up making here.

Ref: https://www.fool.com/earnings/call-...-q2-2018-earnings-conference-call-transc.aspx

We came up with a new design that achieves the same outcome, that's actually lighter, better, cheaper and will be introducing that around the end of this year, probably reach volume production on that in Q1 (2019) or something. That will make the car lighter, better, and cheaper and achieve a higher range. That line is under construction, will be active in about six months (ie - now).
 

tencate

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Hi, everybody. There is a new version of the range table but it has now moved to here
Hi Troy. Any reason you don't have the 2017 Model 3s in the table? Granted, there were maybe just a few thousand of us but just wondering.
 

GDN

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Hi Troy. Any reason you don't have the 2017 Model 3s in the table? Granted, there were maybe just a few thousand of us but just wondering.
For history's sake I could see your point, but there is no difference of any kind between 2017 and 2018 right? For now we all know which to use. If this chart still lives in 10 years your point is valid in that we won't remember that the 2017 and 2018 were the same car.
 

tencate

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no difference of any kind between 2017 and 2018 right?
Perhaps a big one, suspension mods. 2017 cars had the stiff suspension, cars from roughly February on had the softer squishier suspension. That's the only significant thing I can think of that might matter.
 

tencate

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Perhaps a big one, suspension mods.
and if we're keeping track, alcantara interior, flatter folding (but uncomfortable) rear seats and maybe some other differences I've forgotten. Minor stuff, irrelevant to Troy's table however :cool: so delete if you think this doesn't belong here. :)
 

GDN

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and if we're keeping track, alcantara interior, flatter folding (but uncomfortable) rear seats and maybe some other differences I've forgotten. Minor stuff, irrelevant to Troy's table however :cool: so delete if you think this doesn't belong here. :)
That is my point, this isn't tracking anything other than range.
 

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@tencate, each model is only tested once and the same score is used in later years forever. The range numbers you see on the table for LR are based on the 2017 test scores. It says 2018 because LR was discontinued in 2018. Now that LR is back, I will change LR to 2019 but the score is still based on 2017. You might say why not leave it at '2017' then? I would but then people keep asking me to add this year.
 

tencate

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You might say why not leave it at '2017' then? I would but then people keep asking me to add this year.
Ah, excellent clarification. People have told me Max's efficiency numbers are better than the typical LR car for whatever that's worth. Thanks. Makes sense now. Your range value matches my experience exactly. :)
 
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SR vs SR+ battery

@TrevP and team were talking about this topic in the video here. I want to add some comments about this. Based on my calculation, the Model 3 Standard Range battery pack with 2796 cells they were planning for a long time can achieve 240 miles EPA rated range.

According to the leaked information in this article from Aug 2017, the SR pack has 2796 cells compared to 4416 for LR. 4416 for LR turned out to be correct. Therefore 2976 cells for SR is likely correct too. Using Model 3 LRs EPA score from 2017 and the two cell counts and the fact that the SR will be lighter than LR, I'm calculating that 240 miles EPA rated range for SR is possible. Therefore, they don't need a new pack design. There are two options:

Option 1: Both packs would have the same number of cells but the $35K's pack would be software limited.
Option 2: They could remove some cells from the SR pack and use it for the $35K version.
Did you calculate the 240 miles using the more efficient LR motor or the less efficient MR?
If it was the more efficient LR motor, maybe the 220 mile version simply has the MR motor
 

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This is an awesome table. I was wondering why the 'advertised epa rated range' differed so much from the range on the Tesla website when buying a vehicle? Like the M3 lR shows 310 but on the table it says 325.

Also, is there anywhere to see impacts of AC and heat? Tesla used to have a nice range estimator on their website but I can't find it anymore.
 

Dr. J

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This is an awesome table. I was wondering why the 'advertised epa rated range' differed so much from the range on the Tesla website when buying a vehicle? Like the M3 lR shows 310 but on the table it says 325.

Also, is there anywhere to see impacts of AC and heat? Tesla used to have a nice range estimator on their website but I can't find it anymore.
I think what you're seeing on the Tesla website is the AWD (dual motor) version advertised at 310 miles of range, not the RWD (single motor) version which is the one that is advertised at 325 miles of range. The LR RWD is available only "off menu."

What I've seen is that the heater pulls 3-4 kW and the air conditioning pulls about 1 kW, but I believe that all depends on how cold/hot it is and how hot/cold you want it to be in the car. It's pretty clear the resistance heater pulls a lot more juice than a heat pump would. YMMV is huge in the area of heating and cooling.