Strength required to close the trunk lid...

Spiffywerks

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#1
Maybe I'm just so used to having powered trunk lids/hatches - but does the trunk lid seem to require an unusual amount of strength to close?

The gas shocks seem to be overpowered for as small/light as the trunk lid seems, causing it to spring back to fully open at any less than almost fully closed. Most trunk lids I'm used to will either stop at any given angle or slowly reopen. This one feels like a tightly wound spring that resists being bent.

It's nearly impossible to close without using two hands. One to start pulling it down with the inner handle, and the other on to top of the lid to slam it shut once half way down, otherwise, it will spring back open as soon as you let it go. I'm just so afraid I'll end up with tons of scratches on the corner of my trunk lid just from trying to close it.
 

SoFlaModel3

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#2
Maybe I'm just so used to having powered trunk lids/hatches - but does the trunk lid seem to require an unusual amount of strength to close?

The gas shocks seem to be overpowered for as small/light as the trunk lid seems, causing it to spring back to fully open at any less than almost fully closed. Most trunk lids I'm used to will either stop at any given angle or slowly reopen. This one feels like a tightly wound spring that resists being bent.

It's nearly impossible to close without using two hands. One to start pulling it down with the inner handle, and the other on to top of the lid to slam it shut once half way down, otherwise, it will spring back open as soon as you let it go. I'm just so afraid I'll end up with tons of scratches on the corner of my trunk lid just from trying to close it.
I posted the same thing in my first impression. The trunk really wants to remain open!!!
 

AEDennis

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#3
Maybe I'm just so used to having powered trunk lids/hatches - but does the trunk lid seem to require an unusual amount of strength to close?

The gas shocks seem to be overpowered for as small/light as the trunk lid seems, causing it to spring back to fully open at any less than almost fully closed. Most trunk lids I'm used to will either stop at any given angle or slowly reopen. This one feels like a tightly wound spring that resists being bent.

It's nearly impossible to close without using two hands. One to start pulling it down with the inner handle, and the other on to top of the lid to slam it shut once half way down, otherwise, it will spring back open as soon as you let it go. I'm just so afraid I'll end up with tons of scratches on the corner of my trunk lid just from trying to close it.
I posted the same thing in my first impression. The trunk really wants to remain open!!!
I just eat a can of spinach before I close the trunk... works great after that! (and I'm prepared for Bluto too... just in case.)
 

TrevP

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#4
I agree, the force required to close the trunk is a bit much, it's stiff. A few less LBS in the lift struts would do the trick

Anyone who wants to swap them can look here. They're not too expensive https://www.mcmaster.com/
 
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4701

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#5
Pretty much certain that the problem is adjustment. Do not change strut parameters. It's dangerous.
Visit service center and ask to adjust the catch (and lock in case alignment gets too bad).

Trunk lids are usually adjusted so they raise themselves from halfway and ideally they close
if they drop (no hands) down from that specific "halfway" point. This includes sedans, hatchbacks and tourings.
Worst case is when you use the inside handle and pull it down as hard as you close the side door.
It MUST close. Painted surface should never be touched. Only the handle inside.


PS: before visiting service center, verify that weather seal is seated tightly.

Just a remark - all hoods should close when dropped from 20-25cm. This is one of the fitment verification tests in BMW factory.
That includes aluminum hoods of course.
 

msjulie

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#6
I will say that in general I appreciate the tendency to remain open since it is probably related to getting it open in the first place. This failed me though, 2 days back. It was cold out and the lid opened slower than my muscle memory so I bonked my head on the slower-than-usual-moving lid. Ouch.

I'd rather it resist closing a little than fall on me in cold weather (roadster rear lid, I'm talking about you)
 
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#7
Can't say that I've noticed it being hard to close. I certainly don't use two hands to close it (but then I don't use the inner handle to pull it down either).
 

Petra

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#8
Interesting... I didn't play with the trunk lid on the Model 3 I drove last weekend--I guess I should have. One thing I can say is that Tesla was using gas struts that were way too strong on the manual Model S hatch a while back (you had to practically throw it closed). After one of my hatch struts failed, the service center replaced both with new struts that lacked Tesla markings (the replacements were marked Stabilus, a common supplier of these parts) and the hatch opens fine and has been really easy to close ever since.
 

Maevra

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#10
It does take a good bit of force to close the 3's trunk compared to our Corolla (which you could close with one finger).

I prefer to just push the trunk lid closed rather than pull it down using the recessed liftgate handle.
 

skygraff

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#11
Today, I tested some options with the Chicago display model.

It is possible to close the trunk with one hand if you're tall enough to grab the paint from above but it's also possible to "fling" the trunk close in one motion via the grab handles. The latter isn't easy for those with bad shoulders but it doesn't take a lot of force so much as consistent and fluid motion. Given a few tries, I was able to find the happy medium between slamming it with such a fling and falling short of a close so that it would spring back open (as described above).

Having dealt with many winters where I often had to prop my car's hatch open with my head as its struts were overwhelmed by a little snow, I'm quite glad that these struts are more resistive off the factory floor. Don't know if these are prone to weakening over time but I'll go with better safe than sorry. If they are adjustable, however, that would be cool.
 

SoFlaModel3

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#12
Can't say that I've noticed it being hard to close. I certainly don't use two hands to close it (but then I don't use the inner handle to pull it down either).
Interesting... I didn't play with the trunk lid on the Model 3 I drove last weekend--I guess I should have. One thing I can say is that Tesla was using gas struts that were way too strong on the manual Model S hatch a while back (you had to practically throw it closed). After one of my hatch struts failed, the service center replaced both with new struts that lacked Tesla markings (the replacements were marked Stabilus, a common supplier of these parts) and the hatch opens fine and has been really easy to close ever since.
It does take a good bit of force to close the 3's trunk compared to our Corolla (which you could close with one finger).

I prefer to just push the trunk lid closed rather than pull it down using the recessed liftgate handle.
Today, I tested some options with the Chicago display model.

It is possible to close the trunk with one hand if you're tall enough to grab the paint from above but it's also possible to "fling" the trunk close in one motion via the grab handles. The latter isn't easy for those with bad shoulders but it doesn't take a lot of force so much as consistent and fluid motion. Given a few tries, I was able to find the happy medium between slamming it with such a fling and falling short of a close so that it would spring back open (as described above).

Having dealt with many winters where I often had to prop my car's hatch open with my head as its struts were overwhelmed by a little snow, I'm quite glad that these struts are more resistive off the factory floor. Don't know if these are prone to weakening over time but I'll go with better safe than sorry. If they are adjustable, however, that would be cool.
My goal is always to limit touching paint with your hands (something that absolutely can’t be avoided with the frunk for obvious reasons). Using the inside handle definitely requires a double move as the trunk will try to open itself. Not the end of the world, but definitely not the worlds best trunk lid either.
 

skygraff

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#13
My goal is always to limit touching paint with your hands (something that absolutely can’t be avoided with the frunk for obvious reasons). Using the inside handle definitely requires a double move as the trunk will try to open itself. Not the end of the world, but definitely not the worlds best trunk lid either.
To be clear, the inside handle doesn't require a double move if you're willing and able to swing through with your arm as you let go of the handle; effectively flinging the trunk closed. Despite my twin torn labrums, this is probably the method I will use.

Give it a try and let us know what you think.
 

SoFlaModel3

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#14
To be clear, the inside handle doesn't require a double move if you're willing and able to swing through with your arm as you let go of the handle; effectively flinging the trunk closed. Despite my twin torn labrums, this is probably the method I will use.

Give it a try and let us know what you think.
I will try this again, I get the feeling any of us would look very silly with slamming the trunk closed from the inside handle and moving our hand/arm out of the way at the same time. Will report back later.
 

AEDennis

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#15
... (roadster rear lid, I'm talking about you)
Roadster trunk is a whole different challenge with ensuring that it IS closed and latched.

Seriously, as for the Model 3, I was testing it out this afternoon as I popped the trunk open to get the UMC I have back there to charge at the office, I closed it with minimal effort. It's been a while since I've had to use a manual trunk that was not a Roadster, so it doesn't seem overly difficult.
 

Maevra

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#16
@SoFlaModel3, hehe, I've broken a nail trying to close the trunk via the inner handles, so my nail paint job>car's paint for now. ;)

IMO they could improve the inner trunk handle design, as the recess is quite shallow; I'd prefer it to be deeper so you could get a better grip. As it stands, I dislike using the handle method to close because it feels like this:

And I want it to be like this:
 
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4701

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#17
Just a remark - all hoods should close when dropped from 20-25cm. This is one of the fitment verification tests in BMW factory.
That includes aluminum hoods of course.
touching paint with your hands (something that absolutely can’t be avoided with the frunk for obvious reasons). Using the inside handle definitely requires a double move as the trunk will try to open itself.
Actually it is possible to design frunk/hood that closes without touching paint. Use the inner side to drag the hood down. Latch for example. I've done that on BMW's when hood is too dirty from outside (same story, to avoid scratching).
But with the trunk it's serious, it should close just by pulling the inside handle (same force as closing door). Just let serviceshop adjust it.
 

SoFlaModel3

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#18
Actually it is possible to design frunk/hood that closes without touching paint. Use the inner side to drag the hood down. Latch for example. I've done that on BMW's when hood is too dirty from outside (same story, to avoid scratching).
But with the trunk it's serious, it should close just by pulling the inside handle (same force as closing door). Just let serviceshop adjust it.
After reading @AEDennis saying his closes fairy easy it makes me think trunk-gate is the next “gate” after suspension-gate. I will definitely tell the service team and see what they come back with!!