Question SR+ without Autopilot

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OKCU

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#1
We have a 3/2019 SR+ and did not purchase Autopilot or FSD. We are now considering just Autopilot for $3k, but I am a bit confused what the car can do with that. We understand it’s basically adaptive cruise control. It says Autosteer, so I guess it keeps the car in a lane following other cars. Does the car also change lanes automatically when engaging the turn signal? What else are we missing?
Thanks.
 

DocScott

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#2
I have AP and HW2.5, with AP added after I purchased the car, so it's basically the set-up you're contemplating.

It does not change lanes automatically when engaging the turn signal.

It does have TACC, which is a pretty nifty implementation of adaptive cruise control. It also has Autosteer, which is lane-keeping and road-following.

Autosteer is, in my opinion, quite impressive. It handles gaps in the lane markings without difficulty, for instance, and does well in poor visibility. It handles construction zones well most of the time.

You're not supposed to use Autosteer on surface streets or TACC on city streets (the wording in the manual for the two features is a bit different, suggesting TACC can be used on country roads that aren't divided highways while Autosteer shouldn't be). But Tesla doesn't actually prevent you from using them in a wider range of situations, it's just "off-label." I find the combination very helpful in stop-and-go traffic on surface streets, for example.

I wish Tesla used gaze-following rather than hands-on-the-wheel to check that you're being attentive, though. The hands-on-the-wheel approach takes getting used to, as it feels torque, not pressure; i.e., you need to be tugging on the wheel a little bit to let it know you're there, but not so much as to disengage. It takes a bit of practice, but it eventually becomes second-nature.

I found the purchase ($2k when I bought) to be well worth it. I'm not yet all that envious of the EAP and FSD folks, although there are a few features (lane change on signal, for example), that it would be nice to have.
 

rdskill

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#3
I let my hand just sort of hang on the steering wheel. It takes a lot less pressure than it use too to make it drop AP control (keeps cruise control).
 

wackojacko

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ontario
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#4
I have AP and HW2.5, with AP added after I purchased the car, so it's basically the set-up you're contemplating.

It does not change lanes automatically when engaging the turn signal.

It does have TACC, which is a pretty nifty implementation of adaptive cruise control. It also has Autosteer, which is lane-keeping and road-following.

Autosteer is, in my opinion, quite impressive. It handles gaps in the lane markings without difficulty, for instance, and does well in poor visibility. It handles construction zones well most of the time.

You're not supposed to use Autosteer on surface streets or TACC on city streets (the wording in the manual for the two features is a bit different, suggesting TACC can be used on country roads that aren't divided highways while Autosteer shouldn't be). But Tesla doesn't actually prevent you from using them in a wider range of situations, it's just "off-label." I find the combination very helpful in stop-and-go traffic on surface streets, for example.

I wish Tesla used gaze-following rather than hands-on-the-wheel to check that you're being attentive, though. The hands-on-the-wheel approach takes getting used to, as it feels torque, not pressure; i.e., you need to be tugging on the wheel a little bit to let it know you're there, but not so much as to disengage. It takes a bit of practice, but it eventually becomes second-nature.

I found the purchase ($2k when I bought) to be well worth it. I'm not yet all that envious of the EAP and FSD folks, although there are a few features (lane change on signal, for example), that it would be nice to have.
Very nice summary. But as someone who bought EAP with my car in June 2018, then added FSD early last year, the auto-lane change is sooo nice! Had a drive with a stretch from Rochester to Buffalo that the side cameras was covered/fogged? and therefore Nav on Autopilot (auto lane chnages) was not functioning so I had to manual change lanes. now this might sound a bit uppity, but it was more the having to tug the wheel to disengage and then re-engage autopilot. once your use to something going backwards is very hard!

But yes to the OP get Autopilot for $3K at a minimum, strongly consider FSD.
 

JasonF

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#5
My own opinion is that Autopilot, if it doesn't come with the car (as it does now) is an expensive add-on that should be considered carefully.

I decided not to get it because most of my daily driving is on either suburban streets or very short runs of highway. If I took more long trips, or had a 60 mile highway commute in heavy traffic maybe, but it simply wasn't worth $3000 to me. Maybe if it was half the price, so I would only feel somewhat bad for using it very situationally (it was $2500 briefly, but that's still not enough of a discount to justify it).

Even if I had AP, I would skip FSD right now for similar reasons - I just wouldn't use it often enough. And I have a feeling that between developmental issues with it and regulatory hurdles, by the time it's really impressive, there's a chance I might be trading the car in for a newer one anyway - and I'd much rather use the $7,000 for a down payment for that. Could that mean I miss out on the initial impressive real full-self-drive? Possibly, but the amount it costs is a lot to gamble on that, in my opinion. Of course if that's pocket change for you, and you would rather not miss out, go for it - you'll get some value out of it one way or the other.
 
Joined
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#6
If you don't have AP, the. Technically you have an SR (no +) = Standard Range.

I have the same thing.

If you are thinking about adding AP, you might want to talk to them about upgrading to the SR+.
It will cost you a little more but you will also get more range, acceleration, and stereo as well as AP.