Question: Running out of "gas" Tesla stories? How to prevent...

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SoFlaModel3

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#21
Vampire power usually refers to the things in your life that actually are taking power all the time, in particular, when you aren't using it. In most cars, it's just things like the clock. On a Tesla, with all its smarts, there is certainly a larger drain while it is just sitting there.
And don't forget the A/C can stay on to maintain a max inside temperature which makes cooling much easier but that takes juice as well.
 

ModFather

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#22
What is the best course of action if you are low on "fuel" (energy) and there isn't a supercharger, or official charging station, near by?

I can only play this scenario out in my head a few different ways. Extremely bad traffic jam (?), extremely bad PLANNING, or just a complete mistake/human error.
The problem is thinking of an EV in the same way we think of an ICE. If you have never owned or driven an EV, you will be amazed at how smart they are compared to an ICE.

In terms of running out of 'fuel' your T3 will have several fail safe options:
- enter in your destination, like for example 'work', and your UI will tell you if you have enough energy to get there.
- the UI will display a linear chart that will show energy used on the way to your destination. If you are above or below the 'safe' line you can either speed up for more convenience or slow down to get there with the energy you have.
- an EV uses almost no energy when sitting or creeping in traffic
- you can turn off electrical accessories if need be to save on energy
- you will have 5 to 10 miles in reserve when you reach "0" energy left
- you will have many options for charging besides SuperCharging and those options continually grow exponentially by the month.

Really after the first week or two, you will feel completely comfortable with predicting range and eliminating range anxiety.
 

EValuatED

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#23
I'm not so sure it would be that easy to use a dryer hookup. Most dryers are NEMA 14-30 or NEMA 10-30, I believe. Two issues: it produces less power (so fewer miles of range per hour) and your NEMA 14-50 plug won't fit. Better bring lots of adaptors.
Lots of adapters out there, as Model S/X and other EVs (and frankly RVs) have been down this road before (sorry).

If you're looking to have an extension cord in your road trip kit, be smart about conservatively matching High Amps & Wire Gauge, and remember there's losses in long runs. And that dryers may be on 30a breakers.

As far as stories -- I don't have the source (probably somewhere on TMC) -- but I recall reading about a Model S owner who had a long mountainous run and hit high headwinds, heater on, etc., and was running too low to make his destination, so he googled an RV park and spent some time plugged into a 14-50 there to get the extra range to make it safely.

On more thing... PlugShare lists Tesla and other EVers who you can contact in a pinch to plug in. I've read a few of these listings -- as you can imagine, they're supportive, even generous fellow EVers.
 

EValuatED

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#24
The problem is thinking of an EV in the same way we think of an ICE. If you have never owned or driven an EV, you will be amazed at how smart they are compared to an ICE.

In terms of running out of 'fuel' your T3 will have several fail safe options:
- enter in your destination, like for example 'work', and your UI will tell you if you have enough energy to get there.
- the UI will display a linear chart that will show energy used on the way to your destination. If you are above or below the 'safe' line you can either speed up for more convenience or slow down to get there with the energy you have.
- an EV uses almost no energy when sitting or creeping in traffic
- you can turn off electrical accessories if need be to save on energy
- you will have 5 to 10 miles in reserve when you reach "0" energy left
- you will have many options for charging besides SuperCharging and those options continually grow exponentially by the month.

Really after the first week or two, you will feel completely comfortable with predicting range and eliminating range anxiety.
Great summary. With my Volt EV training wheels Ive gotten used to:

Unplug from L2 EVSE.
Drive to work (quietly).
Park.
Work.......
Drive home (quietly).
Plug into L2 EVSE.
Repeat.
Occasional stops at Gas station (for lottery tickets or something to drink).

When they put a charger next to my parking spot at work, I'll plug in there as needed/ available (4 hour 'quick charge' policy).

Home & Destination charging are the norm.

Destinations include work, hotels, restaurants, family, friends, pay chargers, etc.

Supercharging is typically for road trips.

I was surprised just how easy it was to adapt!
 

Brokedoc

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#25
Honestly, the Tesla nav will plot your route to anywhere and tell you the expected battery remaining at the arrival point. If needed, it will plot your route with supercharging stops along the way and tell you the minimum amount of time you need to charge at each stop.

If you run low, there is a range extending setting that maximizes range by limiting air conditioning and optimizing torque.

As with cars, there is a reserve beyond "zero miles" for emergency but I would prefer never to use that. The absolute last resort would be roadside assistance but they would arrive and give you the "Laugh of Shame"
20170806_222708-jpg.2774
 

EValuatED

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#26
Honestly, the Tesla nav will plot your route to anywhere and tell you the expected battery remaining at the arrival point. If needed, it will plot your route with supercharging stops along the way and tell you the minimum amount of time you need to charge at each stop.

If you run low, there is a range extending setting that maximizes range by limiting air conditioning and optimizing torque.

As with cars, there is a reserve beyond "zero miles" for emergency but I would prefer never to use that. The absolute last resort would be roadside assistance but they would arrive and give you the "Laugh of Shame"
View attachment 2774
And there's the https://www.evtripplanner.com/
 

JWardell

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#27
Thanks ..always wondered about that. I saw a video on you Tube that stated an owner came back from a trip and needed a tow truck. I will have to read the manual from end to end ,That's for sure. Now if we could only download that manual b4 we get our new cars.
He parked his Tesla in an airport with something like 15 miles left of range in the battery, then came back after weeks to find it dead. Not the brightest tool. This is the same guy who recently sold his Tesla and said the RWD S is super dangerous because it doesn't have traction in the rain because his tires are bald down to the belts. (!!)
If you have half a brain on your shoulders, you have nothing to worry about.
 

Brokedoc

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#28
He parked his Tesla in an airport with something like 15 miles left of range in the battery, then came back after weeks to find it dead. Not the brightest tool. This is the same guy who recently sold his Tesla and said the RWD S is super dangerous because it doesn't have traction in the rain because his tires are bald down to the belts. (!!)
If you have half a brain on your shoulders, you have nothing to worry about.
He probably also left "cabin overheat protection" on. That turns on the A/C whenever cabin temp is over 90 degrees. You can easily lose 20 miles in a few hours on a hot day.
 
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#29
Thank you for all the great replies! This is so interesting and I can see it is a mentality shift and I was totally unaware of all the features the Tesla operating system has to ensure YOU DO not run out of "fuel."

I have been playing around on plugshare and chargepoint and have a question. There are a lot of different charger selections, please see attached screen shot, which ones should I focus on for road trips? Obviously I understand Super Chargers and Level-2 Tesla would work, but what about the other ones? Or do they all work with adapters.

And I do understand that Level 1 is the slowest charge speed, and Level 2 is better. :)
capture-png.2784
 

garsh

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#30
For roadtrips, you want Supercharger. And that's your only good option. You *could* use CHAdeMO with an adapter, but it's not nearly as fast as a Supercharger, and the adapter costs $450.

The other thing to consider is "destination charging". When you arrive at a hotel, it's nice if you can charge up overnight while parked at the hotel. These are your "Level 2" chargers. These three are all workable for a Tesla:
  • Tesla - will plug right into your car
  • J1772 - your car comes with an adapter for this
  • NEMA 14-50 - the portable charging cable that comes with your car can plug into this 220v outlet.
 

KennethK

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#31
If you use plugshare, make an account and select your vehicle as Model 3 ( reservation). It will choose the appropriate connections. For Model 3, you can use Tesla supercharger, Tesla, J1772 ( with the adapter that come with the vehicle) for sure. Of course if you bring your UMC with you, you can use wall outlet and Nema 14-50. This is the easy selection. For advanced users, if you buy the chademo adapter, you can select that.
 

Model34mePlease

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#32
If you use plugshare, make an account and select your vehicle as Model 3 ( reservation). It will choose the appropriate connections. For Model 3, you can use Tesla supercharger, Tesla, J1772 ( with the adapter that come with the vehicle) for sure. Of course if you bring your UMC with you, you can use wall outlet and Nema 14-50. This is the easy selection. For advanced users, if you buy the chademo adapter, you can select that.
Beware of expectations to use random 240V wall outlets. There are many outlet types with different maximum amperages (typically less than 50A).
 

JWardell

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#33
There are a lot of different charger selections, please see attached screen shot, which ones should I focus on for road trips? Obviously I understand Super Chargers and Level-2 Tesla would work, but what about the other ones? Or do they all work with adapters. View attachment 2784

They ALL work with adapters. Only a Tesla can work with every charger out there. Of course superchargers are fastest and easiest to use, but you truly can plug in everywhere if you carry a few adapters with you.
 

Model34mePlease

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#34
It looked like in the UI of the Model S, there was a way of limiting charger current so you don't blow the circuit breaker when you plug through an adapter into a circuit with less than the 40 amp draw of a NEMA 14-50. Is that how it works?
 

AEDennis

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#35
It looked like in the UI of the Model S, there was a way of limiting charger current so you don't blow the circuit breaker when you plug through an adapter into a circuit with less than the 40 amp draw of a NEMA 14-50. Is that how it works?
This feature to adjust amperage of charge has been a feature in Teslarati vehicles since the Roadster and is a critical part of Tesla's ability to charge from any and many sources.
 
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#36
Thanks for all the replies. Looks like as long as I plan ahead, bring my adapters, i'll be all set. 99.99% of the time our road trips will be on I-5 up and down the west coast so we should be able to find Superchargers and also destination chargers at hotels and restaurants. I'm not anticipating any issues, but I want to make sure I understand what my options are.

My wife already plotted our course from Seattle, WA to San Francisco and it looks like it will be very straight forward. Stop in Portland superchargers, then make our way to SF! :) And this can be done in the lower range Model 3 also, which we may end up getting...

Thanks,
Brett
 

Model34mePlease

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#37
Thanks for all the replies. Looks like as long as I plan ahead, bring my adapters, i'll be all set. 99.99% of the time our road trips will be on I-5 up and down the west coast so we should be able to find Superchargers and also destination chargers at hotels and restaurants. I'm not anticipating any issues, but I want to make sure I understand what my options are.

My wife already plotted our course from Seattle, WA to San Francisco and it looks like it will be very straight forward. Stop in Portland superchargers, then make our way to SF! :) And this can be done in the lower range Model 3 also, which we may end up getting...

Thanks,
Brett
If you want to see a real road trip, @MelindaV posted a version of this video a few days ago. It's pretty fun.

 

Iaeen

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#38
They ALL work with adapters. Only a Tesla can work with every charger out there. Of course superchargers are fastest and easiest to use, but you truly can plug in everywhere if you carry a few adapters with you.
That’s not technically true. There’s no DC Combo/CCS adapter, and Tesla currently can’t speak the protocol needed to use this standard.

Sure, most CCS stations also have CHAdeMO leads as well, but I think the $450 CHAdeMO adapter is cost prohibitive given the availability and superiority of the Supercharger network.
 
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#39
I have also found this helpful video on youtube that outlines some different charging options and costs. After I watched this one I was then shocked at the amount of Tesla "stuff" on youtube!

I saw it on twitter today.
 
Last edited:

Randy

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#40
Mr Jwardell and Brokedoc
Thanks for your replies;
I do have half a brain (my kids destroyed the other half Years ago;))
Thank you both for clarifying the rest of the story regarding the parking lot problems of some You Tubers
I see both you two are very regular with helpful info on this site
I want you to know its appreciated :)