Paint Correction before Ceramic?

SoFlaModel3

@Teslatunity
Moderator
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Messages
9,787
Location
Florida
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#1
@FEYNLAB I hope you can help! I found details on DIY ceramic using your product which gets great reviews. The instructions suggest a full paint correction before applying ceramic. Are you able to speak to exactly what paint correction is (I hear it thrown around a lot) and what happens if you don't do that and/or don't do that well before applying the ceramic. Also, just to make sure I have the right product, this is the DIY ceramic (https://www.feynlab.com/product/ceramic_lite/), right? Last question while I have you -- is it right to think of ceramic as a longer lasting wax or is that selling it short?

Thanks in advance!
 

Nilroc

Active Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2017
Messages
78
Location
North Vancouver
Tesla Owner
Reservation
Country
Country
#2
Basically it involves removing all contaminates off the paint by washing thoroughly and then clay bar to remove any other left over contaminates on the paint. The next step is going over the car with a bright light to reveal any scratches or swirls that are in the paint and buffing them out. Doing paint correction is necessary so the ceramic coating has good clean smooth surface to adhere to.
 

Ken Voss

Top-Contributor
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
424
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#3
Ceramic is not thought of as a longer lasting wax, it is actually more like a micro thin layer of glass that adheres to the clear coat protecting it.

If you have ever been to a car show and wonder why some of the best cars reflect light and shine like they do it is not the paint job or the wax, it is the paint correction.

Wax can be applied right over any clean and clay bar treated paint, Ceramic is less forgiving and to adhere properly, at a MINIMUM the paint needs to be completely decontaminated first, removing microscopic particles of contaminants from the road and the atmosphere that a good wash and clay treatment do not pick up, yes there is still contamination in the pours of the surface that you can not see.

Decontamination is the minimum, now if you want the deepest shine, you need to polish (not wax) the surface to remove small scratches. Try holding a bright LED light or taking your car into the sun after it is washed and check it out with a magnifying glass, you will see small scratches everywhere, you DON'T want to seal these in with Ceramic.

The deepest shine comes from light reflecting off of a completely flat surface. Show cars have many extra coats of clear which are flattened after being painted by wet sanding and then deep polished. When you see a show car with an incredible shine it is NOT because the painter did an awesome job, and its not because of the wax...... its because of the wet sanding and polishing.

Production cars including Tesla do not apply enough coats of clear to allow us to wet sand but we certainly can polish out most of the microscopic defects also known as "Paint Correction"
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 7, 2018
Messages
10
Location
Portland, Oregon
Tesla Owner
No
Country
Country
#4
@FEYNLAB I hope you can help! I found details on DIY ceramic using your product which gets great reviews. The instructions suggest a full paint correction before applying ceramic. Are you able to speak to exactly what paint correction is (I hear it thrown around a lot) and what happens if you don't do that and/or don't do that well before applying the ceramic. Also, just to make sure I have the right product, this is the DIY ceramic (https://www.feynlab.com/product/ceramic_lite/), right? Last question while I have you -- is it right to think of ceramic as a longer lasting wax or is that selling it short?

Thanks in advance!
Machine polishing, after a proper decontamination process, will allow the product to properly adhere to the surface and enhance gloss and slickness as others have mentioned. I would suggest using Feynlab Prime as your clay bar lubricant, as this creates optimal bonding of the coating. If you have never installed a ceramic coating before, I may suggest locating a Certified Installer in your area. Ceramic Lite is a fantastic product with exceptional gloss, beading and protective properties. but does have a bit of a learning curve to install. IMO it is the best entry level coating by a long shot. If you keep your Tesla well maintained and wash it by hand, you will definitely see more than 1 year of protection from it. I hope this information is useful and please don't hesitate to reach out if you have any other questions or concerns!

Sean
 

SoFlaModel3

@Teslatunity
Moderator
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Messages
9,787
Location
Florida
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#5
Machine polishing, after a proper decontamination process, will allow the product to properly adhere to the surface and enhance gloss and slickness as others have mentioned. I would suggest using Feynlab Prime as your clay bar lubricant, as this creates optimal bonding of the coating. If you have never installed a ceramic coating before, I may suggest locating a Certified Installer in your area. Ceramic Lite is a fantastic product with exceptional gloss, beading and protective properties. but does have a bit of a learning curve to install. IMO it is the best entry level coating by a long shot. If you keep your Tesla well maintained and wash it by hand, you will definitely see more than 1 year of protection from it. I hope this information is useful and please don't hesitate to reach out if you have any other questions or concerns!

Sean
Thanks, that is definitey very helpful!
 

Gusm3

Active Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2018
Messages
78
Location
Watsonville ca
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#7
Paint correction is not for every paint I have per white trim paint correct before PPF Then ceramic coat ?
 
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#10
Ceramic is not thought of as a longer lasting wax, it is actually more like a micro thin layer of glass that adheres to the clear coat protecting it.

If you have ever been to a car show and wonder why some of the best cars reflect light and shine like they do it is not the paint job or the wax, it is the paint correction.

Wax can be applied right over any clean and clay bar treated paint, Ceramic is less forgiving and to adhere properly, at a MINIMUM the paint needs to be completely decontaminated first, removing microscopic particles of contaminants from the road and the atmosphere that a good wash and clay treatment do not pick up, yes there is still contamination in the pours of the surface that you can not see.

Decontamination is the minimum, now if you want the deepest shine, you need to polish (not wax) the surface to remove small scratches. Try holding a bright LED light or taking your car into the sun after it is washed and check it out with a magnifying glass, you will see small scratches everywhere, you DON'T want to seal these in with Ceramic.

The deepest shine comes from light reflecting off of a completely flat surface. Show cars have many extra coats of clear which are flattened after being painted by wet sanding and then deep polished. When you see a show car with an incredible shine it is NOT because the painter did an awesome job, and its not because of the wax...... its because of the wet sanding and polishing.

Production cars including Tesla do not apply enough coats of clear to allow us to wet sand but we certainly can polish out most of the microscopic defects also known as "Paint Correction"
Is the polishing option applicable to moderate scratches? I have a couple that slightly catch my fingernail.

What would you recommend to remove a wax/paint sealer in order to prep for a ceramic coat?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Achooo

Active Member
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2018
Messages
187
Location
Orange County, California
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#12
@FEYNLAB I hope you can help! I found details on DIY ceramic using your product which gets great reviews. The instructions suggest a full paint correction before applying ceramic. Are you able to speak to exactly what paint correction is (I hear it thrown around a lot) and what happens if you don't do that and/or don't do that well before applying the ceramic. Also, just to make sure I have the right product, this is the DIY ceramic (https://www.feynlab.com/product/ceramic_lite/), right? Last question while I have you -- is it right to think of ceramic as a longer lasting wax or is that selling it short?

Thanks in advance!
SlFla,

Are you going to be ceramic coating your car? I have been washing my car by your method about every other week with great results, but I have to admit, having a ceramic coat would give me a sense that I don't have to panic every time I see something on the paint. I'm probably a little too obsessive. haha
 

SoFlaModel3

@Teslatunity
Moderator
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Messages
9,787
Location
Florida
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#13
SlFla,

Are you going to be ceramic coating your car? I have been washing my car by your method about every other week with great results, but I have to admit, having a ceramic coat would give me a sense that I don't have to panic every time I see something on the paint. I'm probably a little too obsessive. haha
I haven’t yet, but I made a bottle of ONR Quick Detail and leave it in the trunk with a microfiber towel so the obsession carries on daily :)
 
Joined
Sep 7, 2018
Messages
10
Location
Portland, Oregon
Tesla Owner
No
Country
Country
#14
If you guys end up going with a Feynlab coating, I highly suggest using Feynlab PURE wash which comes in soap or rinseless form. I have and use both on a daily basis and they are excellent for deep cleaning Feynlab coatings. I also am a long time ONR user and love it, but keep in mind ONR has polymer gloss enhancers. When washing and maintaining a Feynlab coated vehicle you want to only deep clean the coating and leave nothing else behind to block the performance and protective properties of the coating.

Sean