Ontario Electrical Safety Authority (ESA) rules for home wall connectors

Mike

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#1
I'd like to gather any knowledge out there regarding Ontario ESA rules as they apply to home wall connectors.

Before I spend a few hours "pulling teeth" with a government bureaucracy for a short list of technical answers, I figured I would see if anyone in our community would have some knowledge in this respect.

My situation: I'm leaning towards a Tesla High Power Wall Connector (HPWC) for my future Model 3. I have a 200 amp service. The main circuit breaker (CB) panel is located in my garage, where the rear starboard (passenger side) quarter panel of the Model 3 will be parked when not in use:
DSC08295.JPG

Based on what Tesla recommends regarding placement of the HPWC, location wise:

recommended_location_for_hpwc.PNG
.....my two locations are either right next to the CB or between garage door one and garage door two:

DSC08296.JPG

I'm leaning towards the location between the garage doors, so I don't have to worry about dragging the HPWC cord through wintertime salt/muck that will be on the floor.

The HPWC has certain fixed amperage options:

amperage chart for hpwc.PNG

My "gut feeling" is I'll want 40 amps at the connector, so my circuit will be wired and CB supplied for 50 amps.

What I know from the Tesla HPWC installation manual:

Locate 4 feet (1.2 m) above the floor and 8 inches (190 mm) from any obstructions; conduit openings are sized for 1 inch (25mm).

What I would like to know:

Is metal conduit required or will the grey PVC conduit (as I've used in other applications in the garage) suffice?

Is a dedicated on-off switch, other than the actual CB in the main CB panel, required for this EV home connector? If so, what are the placement parameters?

Constructive criticism most welcome. Thanks Cheers.


 

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#2
I'd like to gather any knowledge out there regarding Ontario ESA rules as they apply to home wall connectors.

Before I spend a few hours "pulling teeth" with a government bureaucracy for a short list of technical answers, I figured I would see if anyone in our community would have some knowledge in this respect.

My situation: I'm leaning towards a Tesla High Power Wall Connector (HPWC) for my future Model 3. I have a 200 amp service. The main circuit breaker (CB) panel is located in my garage, where the rear starboard (passenger side) quarter panel of the Model 3 will be parked when not in use:
View attachment 900

Based on what Tesla recommends regarding placement of the HPWC, location wise:

View attachment 901
.....my two locations are either right next to the CB or between garage door one and garage door two:

View attachment 902

I'm leaning towards the location between the garage doors, so I don't have to worry about dragging the HPWC cord through wintertime salt/muck that will be on the floor.

The HPWC has certain fixed amperage options:

View attachment 904

My "gut feeling" is I'll want 40 amps at the connector, so my circuit will be wired and CB supplied for 50 amps.

What I know from the Tesla HPWC installation manual:

Locate 4 feet (1.2 m) above the floor and 8 inches (190 mm) from any obstructions; conduit openings are sized for 1 inch (25mm).

What I would like to know:

Is metal conduit required or will the grey PVC conduit (as I've used in other applications in the garage) suffice?

Is a dedicated on-off switch, other than the actual CB in the main CB panel, required for this EV home connector? If so, what are the placement parameters?

Constructive criticism most welcome. Thanks Cheers.


I don't know anything about how Canadians standards differ from US standards, but they are probably not too dissimilar.

The main issue is the distance from the door. Imagine that you left the door open in a heavy rain. Water could get into the works and create a very unsafe condition, and eventual corrosion inside the HPWC.

The HPWC has a NEMA type 3R (IP44) rated enclosure, so it is suitable for weather exposure. The issue them becomes the conduit connection. No, in your case, you cannot use just a cable because the connection to the HPWC would not be weather tight.

The HPWC has a 1" conduit hole on the left side. I would suggest that you use 1' liquid tight conduit such as this:
It is easier to work with that rigid conduit and the fittings are water tight, as the name suggests. Use a right angle fitting at the WPWC end and pre-string the wires in the conduit before attaching to the wall.
 

Mike

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#3
The main issue is the distance from the door.
OK, thanks for that tip. I'll have to see what the actual ESA code specifies regarding distance to door opening for the HPWC.

I'm totally on board regarding conduit and weather tight fittings for same. My only question regarding conduit is will ESA call for metal, or will it allow for PVC (such as your linked example).
 

Badback

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#4
OK, thanks for that tip. I'll have to see what the actual ESA code specifies regarding distance to door opening for the HPWC.

I'm totally on board regarding conduit and weather tight fittings for same. My only question regarding conduit is will ESA call for metal, or will it allow for PVC (such as your linked example).
Liquid tight is flexible METAL conduit, it only has a PVC coating to make it water tight. There must, of course, be a ground wire.
 

Mike

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#6
Further to this story:

Now that I have moved what needed moving prior to installing a dedicated 40 amp, 240 volt circuit for a future HPWC, I want to be able to remotely monitor the energy going thru that one circuit once it is installed.

I understand that the car will have instruments that tell me how much power it has received.

However, like my fuel use computer in my Prius, I suspect some sort of parasitic losses may not be accounted for.

Has anyone out there had any luck finding a single circuit energy use monitor that works between the circuit breaker and the HPWC that would talk to the internet? Thanks.
 

KennethK

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#7
Further to this story:
I want to be able to remotely monitor the energy going thru that one circuit once it is installed.
Has anyone out there had any luck finding a single circuit energy use monitor that works between the circuit breaker and the HPWC that would talk to the internet? Thanks.
@Mike I have been looking at several systems to do just that, but have not chosen one yet:

http://www.theenergydetective.com/compare

http://efergy.com/us/

http://neur.io/

I currently have a Juicebox pro (EVSE) that monitors energy usage itself and logs it to the account.
https://emotorwerks.com/products/juicebox
 

Mike

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#8

Badback

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#9
Further to this story:

Now that I have moved what needed moving prior to installing a dedicated 40 amp, 240 volt circuit for a future HPWC, I want to be able to remotely monitor the energy going thru that one circuit once it is installed.

I understand that the car will have instruments that tell me how much power it has received.

However, like my fuel use computer in my Prius, I suspect some sort of parasitic losses may not be accounted for.

Has anyone out there had any luck finding a single circuit energy use monitor that works between the circuit breaker and the HPWC that would talk to the internet? Thanks.
https://www.egauge.net/
 

KennethK

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#13
I don't know what you mean by a hub, but the unit at the link appears to be for a single circuit which is what I am exploring.
It needs to communicate to a ZigBee hub, like Samsung smart hub. Check out the details, because I wasn't sure which hub it needs.
 

garsh

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#14
That's an interesting choice, @KennethK. I like the price. I'll have to look into the capabilities of a z-wave HUB, and how much they cost.

I would prefer a wired connection to a server, but that's not a deal breaker.
It takes AA batteries. Could be a bit of a pain to have to change batteries in my electrical panel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z-Wave
 

Mike

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#16
That's an interesting choice, @KennethK. I like the price. I'll have to look into the capabilities of a z-wave HUB, and how much they cost.

I would prefer a wired connection to a server, but that's not a deal breaker.
It takes AA batteries. Could be a bit of a pain to have to change batteries in my electrical panel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z-Wave
This appears to be a whole "thing" I never heard of before until this thread. I thought one could buy a simple widget, attach it to the one circuit breaker in question, and have it talk to my home wifi. I guess ignorance was bliss.

Why can't the HPWC come with this capability anyway?
 

KennethK

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#17
Why can't the HPWC come with this capability anyway?
There are EVSE's that do come with this feature, like emotorwerks Juicebox pro. It has a J1772 connector, but Tesla's come with a J1772 to Tesla adapter. That is what I am going to use.

I'm hoping that Tesla will make a HPWC with wifi capabilities by the time the Model 3 comes out.