NEMA 14-30R Y adaptor that splits to two NEMA 5-15P connectors

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Scott Walker

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#1
I have been searching the internet for a custom Y adaptor to allow me to charge without a custom installation, taking advantage of two standard plugs.

The goal is to plug into two 15 AMP plugs to get a 30 Amp connection to the Tesla NEMA 14-30P mobile connector. The plugs will need to be connected to different poles on the electrical panel, but the two 15 Amp connections will give ~30 Amps to the car.

I know how to build this myself but have had issues locating a good 14-30R connector that can be used outside that is not overly expensive.

Has anyone built or bought one of these?
Thanks!
 
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I like your thought process but keep in mind that this is definitely not allowed. Also you will not get 30 amps by using 2 5-15 receptacles. You would get 15 amps at 240V. It would charge twice as fast as with a single 120 plug.

As you stated, the 5-15 plugs must go to separate legs on the main panel. Also in your adapter you cannot tie the neutrals together because each branch circuit must have its own independent neutral wire. (Neutral wires do not have circuit breakers and it could be dangerous if you start twisting neutral wires together.) Also if you are charging at 12 amps. (80% of 15 amps) and one of the breakers independently trips it could create a potentially dangerous situation for any equipment on the circuits because you will have one energized leg and the other leg will just be floating and the energized leg could potentially start back feeding into the floating leg. This is why double pole breakers interrupt both wires at the same time.
 

garsh

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This is the device you're looking for:
http://www.quick220.com/220_catalog/voltage-converters.html

But honestly, you'd be better off converting one of your NEMA 5-15 outlets to a NEMA 6-15 outlet. The end result is the same (something that can provide 15 amps at 240v), but it's less expensive than a quick220 and not too hard to retrofit. And the car will automatically limit itself to pulling 12 amps when you use the 6-15 adapter for the mobile connector.

There is one other possibility. But you have to confirm that this is the only outlet on that circuit before doing this. Turn off the breaker and check every outlet and light switch in the house to confirm.
  1. On the outlet side, replace the NEMA 5-15 outlet (15 amps at 120v) with a NEMA 6-15 outlet (15 amps at 240v).
  2. On the breaker panel side, replace the 15 amp one-pole breaker with a 15 amp two-pole breaker.
  3. On the breaker panel side, connect the cable's two conductors to the two positions of the new breaker (currently, only one will be on the one-pole breaker, and the other will be connected to neutral).
  4. Purchase a NEMA 6-15 adapter from Tesla for $35 in order to plug in the UMC that comes with the car.
This will increase your charging rate from ~3 mph to ~11 mph.

 

JWardell

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#5
I have been searching the internet for a custom Y adaptor to allow me to charge without a custom installation, taking advantage of two standard plugs.

The goal is to plug into two 15 AMP plugs to get a 30 Amp connection to the Tesla NEMA 14-30P mobile connector. The plugs will need to be connected to different poles on the electrical panel, but the two 15 Amp connections will give ~30 Amps to the car.

I know how to build this myself but have had issues locating a good 14-30R connector that can be used outside that is not overly expensive.

Has anyone built or bought one of these?
Thanks!
I know what you are thinking, but it's not really possible with a North American Tesla, as its battery charger is only single phase (European Teslas can charge on 2 or 3 phases).
Furthermore Tesla's adapters communicate and limit the charging current. The highest current you can get from 120 is 16A with a 5-20 adapter and plug. If you have 12 gauge wiring, you can certainly make sure you have one of these sockets installed easily.

But it is much better to try to find a solution to get to 220V, even if it is a lower current. There are a LOT of ways to do this reasonably, but all depends on your situation.
First, as mentioned, the Quick220 is idea for plugging into two separate standard 120 plugs if you are in a place where you can't change or install anything at all. I made my own and take it when traveling, like if I stay in an AirBNB for a few days.

Second, if you have a dedicated 120V outlet by your car, you can simply switch the breaker and outlet as Garsh mentioned to make it 220V.

If you are a DIY er, installing a proper new run of 10/3 wire to a proper 14-30 outlet is also a very inexpensive and simple project.
 

Scott Walker

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#6
Check out: https://www.bsaelectronics.com/

I bought a Dryer Buddy from Brad and it’s worked great I’m sure Brad can make whatever you need.
I'll check it out... Thanks!


I like your thought process but keep in mind that this is definitely not allowed. Also you will not get 30 amps by using 2 5-15 receptacles. You would get 15 amps at 240V. It would charge twice as fast as with a single 120 plug.

As you stated, the 5-15 plugs must go to separate legs on the main panel. Also in your adapter you cannot tie the neutrals together because each branch circuit must have its own independent neutral wire. (Neutral wires do not have circuit breakers and it could be dangerous if you start twisting neutral wires together.) Also if you are charging at 12 amps. (80% of 15 amps) and one of the breakers independently trips it could create a potentially dangerous situation for any equipment on the circuits because you will have one energized leg and the other leg will just be floating and the energized leg could potentially start back feeding into the floating leg. This is why double pole breakers interrupt both wires at the same time.
Good info on tying the neutrals together, thanks! I was not 100% sure on how to handle those. I guess I have some more research to do.


This is the device you're looking for:
http://www.quick220.com/220_catalog/voltage-converters.html

But honestly, you'd be better off converting one of your NEMA 5-15 outlets to a NEMA 6-15 outlet. The end result is the same (something that can provide 15 amps at 240v), but it's less expensive than a quick220 and not too hard to retrofit. And the car will automatically limit itself to pulling 12 amps when you use the 6-15 adapter for the mobile connector.
The issue is, the locations I am hoping to charge at, are not owned by me. Trying not to re-wire other peoples' houses/cottages.


I know what you are thinking, but it's not really possible with a North American Tesla, as its battery charger is only single phase (European Teslas can charge on 2 or 3 phases).
Furthermore Tesla's adapters communicate and limit the charging current. The highest current you can get from 120 is 16A with a 5-20 adapter and plug. If you have 12 gauge wiring, you can certainly make sure you have one of these sockets installed easily.

But it is much better to try to find a solution to get to 220V, even if it is a lower current. There are a LOT of ways to do this reasonably, but all depends on your situation.
First, as mentioned, the Quick220 is idea for plugging into two separate standard 120 plugs if you are in a place where you can't change or install anything at all. I made my own and take it when traveling, like if I stay in an AirBNB for a few days.

Second, if you have a dedicated 120V outlet by your car, you can simply switch the breaker and outlet as Garsh mentioned to make it 220V.

If you are a DIY er, installing a proper new run of 10/3 wire to a proper 14-30 outlet is also a very inexpensive and simple project.
I would love to see the part list of the one you built. Yeah, a bit of a DIY er; I installed my wall charger just fine at home, but would use this adapter at various cottages we visit in the summer.
 

JWardell

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#7
Yeah, a bit of a DIY er; I installed my wall charger just fine at home, but would use this adapter at various cottages we visit in the summer.
Then the Quick220 is definitely your answer, along with some decent extension cords.
I totally meant to document and post details on my DIY version, which in addition to lower costs adds ability to swap hot/neutrals.
 

JasonF

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#8
If there is an electric dryer on the premises, you could get the 10-30 and 14-30 plug adapters for the Mobile Connector, and maybe nice thick extension cords for each in case the car isn't anywhere near the dryer outlet. That's how I was thinking of doing it when I wasn't sure if I'd get the 14-50 outlet installed before my Model 3 was delivered.

I personally wouldn't do anything like string 110-volt outlets together. The Mobile Connector could get damaged (not to mention the risk of a fire in close proximity to the car!), and that's a Really Bad Thing while far away from home.
 

garsh

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#9
The issue is, the locations I am hoping to charge at, are not owned by me. Trying not to re-wire other peoples' houses/cottages.
If you visit often, it might be worthwhile to offer to pay for an electrician to wire up a NEMA 14-50 outlet for them. They'll come out ahead (the energy you use will never match the installation cost), and you prepare their home/cottage for the EV future.