Model 3 with Kids

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danzgator

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#22
Thanks for posting, although this is bummer news. We have 2 kids (3.5yo and 1.5yo) but need this car to potentially handle a third car seat during its life. From the measurement numbers and from the opportunity I got to sit in You You's car when he was in Denver during his road trip, I was under the impression it could be done. Hmmm.

Regarding front-to-back space, if the Model 3 back seat is more flat, than it would cause a rear-facing seat to recline back more, leaving less room. That makes sense. However, I don't see why you couldn't angle it more to have the seat be more vertical. I understand your reference to safety recommendations between 30-45, but if the Model S allows the seat to be more vertical because of the slanting backseat and that is considered "safe", I'm not sure why you couldn't mimic that in the 3 and have it also considered safe. Also, are your other car seats rear-facing? Would it help if you installed the rear-facing in the center and the forward-facing or boosters on the outside to fix the front-to-back spacing issue? This would also help the side-to-side spacing.

I will be following this thread closely, as this is largely the hinging point of getting the Model 3 or not.
Im not sure if the flat seat is the issue, that’s just my guess I guess I could try to eek a couple more degrees out of it, but what am i gonna do, shove some untested pillow under there? Other seats are not rear facing. They’re in boosters.rear facing in the center compounds the problem to the driver, which is unacceptable to me. You my be able to get the passenger more room, but at the expense of the driver.
 

danzgator

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#23
Whether or not 3 car seats can fit on the rear bench, he confirmed there are only attachments for two. Are there ways of securely fastening a third child seat in place without the necessary LATCH attachment points?

(I have never installed a child seat so pardon my ignorance)
Yes, you can secure most with the seat belt, just not as convenient.
 
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danzgator

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#24
It may be less helpful in other ways, but could you solve your font-to-back spacing with the rear-facing seat by putting it in the middle and having the boosters on the outside?
That forces you to push the driver seat more forward.
 
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#26
Im not sure if the flat seat is the issue, that’s just my guess I guess I could try to eek a couple more degrees out of it, but what am i gonna do, shove some untested pillow under there? Other seats are not rear facing. They’re in boosters.rear facing in the center compounds the problem to the driver, which is unacceptable to me. You my be able to get the passenger more room, but at the expense of the driver.
I've heard from multiple people that the rear seat is more flat or has less thigh support (essentially the same thing), and I noticed it when I sat in the back of the Model 3. Given the similarity of the measurements between the Model S and Model 3, this is the only reasoning I can think of for the spacing issue with rear-facing seats. I guess when someone shows it off in Denver, I'll have to see if I can try it out again.

Thanks again for posting. This is very helpful, and is reminding me to continue to be cautious on this purchase decision.
 

Roderick80

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#27
Idk. My wife drives a ‘16 GMC Acadia (full size SUV that is slightly larger than the current model) and I had to move the seet forward/tilt more upright than I would otherwise (more upright tilt than what i can see in the pic).

Good news is, rear facing seats are a short tem problem.

Thanks for posting this btw- you are right about the lack of intel and I hope you post more of your observations.
 

GTV6

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#28
I have memories of my parents throwing me and my sister (ages 4 and 3) in the bed of the pickup truck for a cross-state trip from Pittsburgh to Philadelphia.

"Safety" was my dad telling us to sit up against the cab of the truck. ;)
Our family of four happily drove in our 356 Porsche in the 50’s the 1200 miles to visit my grandfather in Florida. My brother was an 8th grader and I was in 4th, both of us in the jump seats. All our luggage for 2 weeks. Without a luggage rack. The neighbors called it ‘child abuse’.
Of course, I now have a curve in my back of unknown origin.
 

danzgator

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#29
You can kind of tell it's a little narrower in the back seat of the Model 3 in this comparison video. The guy explains that shoulder room is pinched in the S by the windows being angled in, while they're more vertical on the 3. The S is wider than the 3, but shoulder room is pinched in the S. The 3 only has 1" less shoulder room than the S due to the S' window angle. If they had the same window angle, the 3 would have much less shoulder room. The shoulder room difference would be greater than 1" lower in the car below the window. So, I suspect the Model 3 must have 1.5" to 2" less hip room than the Model S. That is probably the root cause of the 3 car seat issue.

https://insideevs.com/tesla-model-3-versus-model-s-rear-seat-comparison-video/
 
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#30
You can kind of tell it's a little narrower in the back seat of the Model 3 in this comparison video. The guy explains that shoulder room is pinched in the S by the windows being angled in, while they're more vertical on the 3. The S is wider than the 3, but shoulder room is pinched in the S. The 3 only has 1" less shoulder room than the S due to the S' window angle. If they had the same window angle, the 3 would have much less shoulder room. The shoulder room difference would be greater than 1" lower in the car below the window. So, I suspect the Model 3 must have 1.5" to 2" less hip room than the Model S. That is probably the root cause of the 3 car seat issue.

https://insideevs.com/tesla-model-3-versus-model-s-rear-seat-comparison-video/
According to Teslarati, the difference in hip room is, in fact, 2.3", so your interpretation seems on target.

*Edit: Added link: https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-3-interior-space-vs-model-s-x/
 

danzgator

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#32
According to Teslarati, the difference in hip room is, in fact, 2.3", so your interpretation seems on target.

*Edit: Added link: https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-3-interior-space-vs-model-s-x/
Ouch, that's a lot. The Car Seat Lady (who I hope is a car seat expert) says that the Bubble Bum is the narrowest booster. So, I'm going to get one and see if its solves the problem. I will keep you all posted.

http://thecarseatlady.com/narrowest-boosters/
https://www.bubblebum.co/us/shop/
 
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danzgator

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#36
After driving around all weekend with the two older kids, I think the Model 3 works fine as a secondary car for a family with 3 kids, as long as they are all forward-facing and at least one is old enough to be in a booster or just in the seat. The one in the booster or seat would most likely be in the middle seat because I don't think any two forward facing car seats on the market can work side-by-side. So, the older child in the middle, couldn't be too wide.

I was hoping to use the Model 3 as our primary car, the way I use my Model S, but with the back seat and cargo constraints, I think we'd be stuck in the minivan most of the time, which I can't stand. If the Model 3 is going to be our secondary vehicle, there really isn't any reason to pay $9,000 for the long range battery because I wouldn't use the car for family road trips. If I had to go 200+ miles for work, I'd either make the short range work and make an extra stop to charge, get a rental and not put miles on my car, or take the primary car and leave my wife with the secondary car for the day.

Assuming the Model Y is going to be available in the next couple years and the backseat width is addressed somehow, I think our perfect scenario would be a Short Range Model 3 for me as a secondary vehicle and a Long Range Model Y for my wife as our primary vehicle. I realize that the Model X probably makes more sense size-wise, but we just cannot afford that.
 

danzgator

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#38
Unlikely, since they'll be making the Y on the same chassis as the 3.
Model S Width = 77.3"
Model S Rear Shoulder Room: 55"
Mode S Rear Hip Room: 54.7"
Model X Width = 81.5"
Model X 2nd Row Shoulder Room: 56.8"
Model X 2nd Row Hip Room: 59"

4.3" is a lot of extra hip room between the S and the X. Even 2" more between the Model 3 and Model Y would get you back to Model S territory, which is enough.
 
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#39
I was hoping to use the Model 3 as our primary car, the way I use my Model S, but with the back seat and cargo constraints, I think we'd be stuck in the minivan most of the time, which I can't stand. If the Model 3 is going to be our secondary vehicle, there really isn't any reason to pay $9,000 for the long range battery because I wouldn't use the car for family road trips. If I had to go 200+ miles for work, I'd either make the short range work and make an extra stop to charge, get a rental and not put miles on my car, or take the primary car and leave my wife with the secondary car for the day.
I've been thinking the same thing about SR vs LR for my Model 3. We have 4 kids and for any drive with the whole family we have to use the minivan.
I plan to put the $9,000 not spent on the LR towards a new family vehicle, preferably a BEV. If we can squeak 2-3 more years out of the minivan maybe by then there will be some more affordable BEV options for a family of 6.
 

Three Pixel

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#40
After driving around all weekend with the two older kids, I think the Model 3 works fine as a secondary car for a family with 3 kids, as long as they are all forward-facing and at least one is old enough to be in a booster or just in the seat. The one in the booster or seat would most likely be in the middle seat because I don't think any two forward facing car seats on the market can work side-by-side. So, the older child in the middle, couldn't be too wide.

I was hoping to use the Model 3 as our primary car, the way I use my Model S, but with the back seat and cargo constraints, I think we'd be stuck in the minivan most of the time, which I can't stand. If the Model 3 is going to be our secondary vehicle, there really isn't any reason to pay $9,000 for the long range battery because I wouldn't use the car for family road trips. If I had to go 200+ miles for work, I'd either make the short range work and make an extra stop to charge, get a rental and not put miles on my car, or take the primary car and leave my wife with the secondary car for the day.

Assuming the Model Y is going to be available in the next couple years and the backseat width is addressed somehow, I think our perfect scenario would be a Short Range Model 3 for me as a secondary vehicle and a Long Range Model Y for my wife as our primary vehicle. I realize that the Model X probably makes more sense size-wise, but we just cannot afford that.
My wife and I are worried about fitting a forward and a rear facing car seat. Luckily only two seats (with no plan for a third). With us being 6’ 2” and 5’ 10” resectively, would you guesstimate we’d be a bit more comfortable as a primary car? I realize without actually trying it’s a hard guess, but trying to calm my fears that this car is just a tad to small for us. Right now we use a 2012 Prius as our main car and we’re hoping for a bit more room (but also not expecting huge gains).