Model 3 vs Leaf suspensions/ride

Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
23
Location
Bellevue, WA
Country
Country
#82
that sounds really surprising actually with such a significant difference between the two technologies.
It wasn't a scientific measurement. I just came in with the expectation that it'd be, in some way, worse than the S's air suspension. While I'm sure it is on some level, I'd probably only notice the difference if someone told me to pay attention to the difference ahead of time. My riding experience however will vary to anyone else's.

It should be noted that when we got the Model S, I did expect that the air suspension would smooth out the ride more than it did. So it could be our Model S air suspension isn't the best quality. I wouldn't know for sure...
 

Elcaro

Member
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Messages
5
Location
Redwood City, CA
Country
Country
#83
Click bait title for sure. Dirty little secret? Give me a break. Probably a short.

My post reply from TMC:

Comparing a Leaf to a 3? What did you expect? A mushy commuter box that can only muster .76g load on a skidpad and has a 10.4 second 0-60 to a great handling sports sedan? (Yes. I’ve driven the 3 and on worse roads in Canada) There is always a trade off in ride vs. performance. The 3’s ride was on par with the Audi and BMW sports sedans I’ve driven. Pickup truck ride? Not a chance.

The meter scales are different. On the 3 you can see the entire needle on the right. On the Leaf you can only see the needle tip. This suggests the 3’s scale is magnified.
Not only that, the device was mounted almost vertically on 3, and tilted on Leaf. This affects the g sensor of the device on leaf senses less. If you ask an engineer, you'll be given this formula: force sensed = force actual * cosine(angle of tilt).

Still, no denying the leaf suspension is more compliant - the water spilt more in 3 - and it does spill over sideways than front and back so it's not the 0-60 5sec acceleration causing the spill.

I know many people complained about harsh ride of Mazda 3. I love it for that - so this experiment makes me wait for 3 all the more.
 
Last edited:

tivoboy

Top-Contributor
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
592
Location
Palo Alto, CA
Country
Country
#86
In my opinion, the ride quality with the Unplugged Performance 'Moderate' lowered springs are better. They are slightly softer, but still tight in the corners/turns. Here are some pictures of the springs from the factory and the Unplugged versions. Also photos of the lowered Model 3 height. View attachment 5571 View attachment 5572 View attachment 5573
that looks boss! (yeah I know, 90's slang),, which wheels are those? And that BLUE, oh that Blue.. I might have to rethink my steel grey choices.
 

DR61

Active Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2016
Messages
83
Location
Redding, CA
Country
Country
#88
In my opinion, the ride quality with the Unplugged Performance 'Moderate' lowered springs are better.
Most likely true, but there are reasons that most factory suspensions do not use variable spring rates. One is that transient handing is somewhat adversely affected with variable rate springs compared to constant rates. Also there may be higher probability of bottoming out on the bump stops, which can cause sudden loss of control. Not to say that these particular springs are not a good choice.
 

Sandy

One obsession to the next
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2017
Messages
953
Location
Ontario east of the GTA
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#89
Nice ride height, not to low. Hyperco were a good aftermarket choice. They have been around forever. The spring pictures above clearly illustrate the difference between linear and progressive/variable rate springs. The stock springs are linear rate and matching dampers/shock absorbers to linear rate springs is relatively easy given the linear springs characteristics. It gets more complicated with progressive/variable rate springs as the spring rate increases significantly during compression. Progressive rate springs are commonly used in lowered cars to prevent the suspension from bottoming out. This effectively means a compressed progressive rate spring with a stock damper can be over or most likely under dampened depending where the spring is in it’s travel.

This is a pretty good explanation if interested:

http://automotivethinker.com/suspension/linear-vs-progressive-rate-springs/
 

PNWmisty

Legendary Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
2,539
Location
Anacortes, WA
Country
Country
#91
This thread is making me more excited to take delivery!

I've always hated low performance suspensions designed to coddle non-athletic Americans amoeba-like bodies with no muscle tone. That's the fastest way to nausea. I want a car that makes me feel like an Olympic athlete. And there is nothing worse than how easily a soft suspension bottoms out. A soft suspension is tuned for low speeds, low performance and smooth roads. A firm suspension is tuned for higher speeds and bigger bumps. You need a higher spring rate to handle higher forces. The only other way is to increase the travel of the suspension but that has it's own downsides in terms of cost/weight/handling. A famous yogi once commented on how soft American suspensions were unhealthy to proper functioning of internal organs/digestion. Too much coddling.

Give me fresh air and a firm suspension and I'll feel liberated from the bad dream that is American "luxury".