Model 3 underside walkthrough and what's under the frunk

3V Pilot

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#2
Great videos, thanks for posting these. The guy is very knowledgeable and I love all the details he explains. I was very surprised to see an oil filter on the gearbox though. Does the S/X have the same thing? I wonder if it has a service interval and also wonder why Tesla would feel the need to put a filter on a gearbox with only one gear. Anyone have any insight for this? If I were to venture a guess I'd say it's due to the amount of torque an electric motor can produce but ICE cars with huge torque don't have filters like that on the diff or transmission.
 

Thom Moore

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#3
Yes, thank you very much for these very cool videos. Not everyone has a lift but we'd all like to see what's going on in our cars.

I have the same question about the oil filter?

Also, I saw a diagram implying that the DC/DC converter covered the need to 12 V power, implying no 12 V battery, but that was clearly wrong.
 
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4701

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#5
Oil filter - YES! That one will remove particles that appear after first 10k, prolonging reduction gear life AND prolonging service interval even more.
 
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Thom Moore

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#7
Oil filter - YES! That one will remove all particles that appear after first 10k, prolonging reduction gear life AND prolonging service interval even more.
I wonder if the filter is to address all the drive units that were replaced for being "noisy" on the MS? We are on our third drive unit at 105,000 km.
 
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4701

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#9
Not sure. I've heard drive units have/had extremely complicated design flaw.
Electric motor induces electricity in the rotor shaft. Which is spinning on the bearings. Outer ring
of those bearings is grounded (body chassis). And induced voltage resolves through bearing.
That produces arching and erodes bearing material, ruining them way too soon. Has nothing to do
with oil. Rather very powerful and compact induction motor drawbacks.
I've heard about adding a brush that touches the rotor just to ground it. So brush is eroded, not bearing.

It can be a myth, but it sounds way too complicated to make this s*** up:confused:

I hope this filter is more than just oil particulate filter. I hope it has ultra fine filtration and also moisture removal function.

Also, electric oil pump appears to something new. AFAIK, natural lubrication is used on S/X.
 
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4701

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#10
No wonder the Germans were impressed.
I'm not German, but I'm impressed (as a rookie engineer). Lot's of simplifications.
AC piping appears to be very short. Glycol loop is ultra compact.
Electrohydraulic booster at the master cylinder.
It all seems way nicer than on S.

EDIT: I'm impressed as well
@Twiglett
 
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Twiglett

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#11
I'm not German, but I'm impressed (as a rookie engineer). Lot's of simplifications.
AC piping appears to be very short. Glycol loop is ultra compact.
Electrohydraulic booster at the master cylinder.
It all seems way nicer than on S.
He’s referring to the Model 3 that was imported to Germany by a group of manufacturers who then test drove it around before pulling it to bits.
Apparently they were impressed.
 
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4701

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#13
I wonder if that design might allow for aftermarket installation of a second motor
This is possible, but very expensive. New springs. New dampers. Dropping the battery. 20-40 hours of work.
Registration edits. Too complicated.
It could make sense if AWD Model 3 was for spare parts and somebody wants to do it on their own.
 

skygraff

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#14
This is possible, but very expensive. New springs. New dampers. Dropping the battery. 20-40 hours of work.
Registration edits. Too complicated.
It could make sense if AWD Model 3 was for spare parts and somebody wants to do it on their own.
Interesting, thanks. Didn't realize that the battery would need to be dropped. Have to rewatch the vid for better handle on the layout.
 

c2c

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#15
Too bad the camera didn’t look for trailer hitch mounting hard points. Oh well.
 

JWardell

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#16
I've been expecting a video like this for a while. There's so much to see if we could all break it down frame by frame.
Also clears up what I had been wondering for a while: what's under the frunk liner, and how much extra space is there? Sadly the extra space for the front drive unit is not really in a usable location.
I subscribes in hopes they add a few more.
 

m3_4_wifey

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#17
If you jack up car, maybe a full size spare could be stored where the front motor would go.

Was there any differences in the safety ratings on a Model S between RWD and AWD? Maybe it is diminishing returns, but I would think the extra room in the front of the car would make RWD cars slightly safer in a head on collision.
 
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garsh

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#18
If you jack up car, maybe a full size spare could be stored where the front motor would go.
No, not even a compact spare will fit there, unfortunately.

A brake rotor would barely fit.


 
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4701

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#20
Yesterday, I got a puncture. This is like holy s*** sized object.






It took me 5 minutes to pull it out (didn't have pliers in my car), 3 minutes to fix the hole, 2 minutes to inflate with OEM compressor.
100% success. Last puncture happened when vehicle had a mileage of less than 100km:eek::D. It's 108000km now.

Some say it's complicated. I tell you, if you know how to change whole tire, you can definitely do this thing. And you don't have to visit a workshop later on. Super easy.
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/RER...r-Tool-Kit-Puncture-Tubeless/32673139254.html
What I learned: always have pliers onboard:oops: And forget that spare. It's pointless. My other car has spare. Changing tire takes much more time at the side of the road.