Model 3 Trunk Insulation

Perscitus

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No point. It works and there is enough of a change to register on the rusty ol' ear meter. Nonetheless, someone posted prelim and somewhat unscientific results earlier in the thread... 5dB if I recall while at speed and on noisy tarmac. Good enough.
 
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Did a test of the ventilation with the cover using a a CO2 monitor borrowed from a friend (with two persons in the car):

- To get a baseline, I opened all windows for a few minutes. The monitor was showing ~400ppm, which is about the same as the normal background concentration in outdoor ambient air.
- I then closed the windows and switched the HVAC to fan speed 3 with recirculation off. The CO2 concentration stabilized at around 650ppm with this setting (which is similar to what you typically get indoors in occupied buildings). Values under 800ppm are considered good.
- I then switched the system to recirculation. Within the next 10 minutes, the measured value climbed to about 1200ppm (which is considered unhealthy).
- I then switched recirculation off again; the CO2 concentration dropped back down to ~650ppm within another 10 minutes or so.

Conclusion: with the cover installed, the ventilation in the car is sufficient to remove CO2 from the cabin fairly quickly when recirculation is turned off. It will likely also be enough to get humidity out of the cabin. Also, don't use recirculation for extended periods of time since the CO2 concentration increases to unhealthy levels that can cause drowsiness
 

MelindaV

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Did a test of the ventilation with the cover using a a CO2 monitor borrowed from a friend (with two persons in the car):

- To get a baseline, I opened all windows for a few minutes. The monitor was showing ~400ppm, which is about the same as the normal background concentration in outdoor ambient air.
- I then closed the windows and switched the HVAC to fan speed 3 with recirculation off. The CO2 concentration stabilized at around 650ppm with this setting (which is similar to what you typically get indoors in occupied buildings). Values under 800ppm are considered good.
- I then switched the system to recirculation. Within the next 10 minutes, the measured value climbed to about 1200ppm (which is considered unhealthy).
- I then switched recirculation off again; the CO2 concentration dropped back down to ~650ppm within another 10 minutes or so.

Conclusion: with the cover installed, the ventilation in the car is sufficient to remove CO2 from the cabin fairly quickly when recirculation is turned off. It will likely also be enough to get humidity out of the cabin. Also, don't use recirculation for extended periods of time since the CO2 concentration increases to unhealthy levels that can cause drowsiness
did you do the same before the cover was installed? how different were the numbers?
 

Skione65

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I believe what @MelindaV is getting at and what would be my question to really see the significance would be ‘what we’re the CO2 numbers/concentration in ppm “without” the cover and recirc on’. How does that compare to the 1200 ppm number?

Ski
 

mrau

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No, I didn't have the CO2 monitor at the time. I'm satisfied with the result and don't feel it's necessary to go to the trouble of removing the cover to repeat the test.
Maybe if you tested with one of the back seats partially folded down it would be enough to simulate "without the cover" and no need to remove your installation. I would not expect much change in your numbers though. Thanks again for performing your tests and sharing with us.
 
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Maybe if you tested with one of the back seats partially folded down it would be enough to simulate "without the cover" and no need to remove your installation. I would not expect much change in your numbers though. Thanks again for performing your tests and sharing with us.
I can try that next week. However, as you say 1200ppm with recirculation on is about what I would expect in any car. Recirculation can be helpful to quickly change the cabin temperature, or when you're driving though heavy traffic (where the outside air often has high concentrations of fine particulate matter, ozone, NOx and other contaminants), but it should generally not be used for extended periods of time. I wish the Model 3 was less aggressive about using recirculation in Auto mode (at the current temperatures here it is almost always on if you leave the HVAC on Auto). Ideally it would be great if the HVAC could open/close the fresh air intake based on a CO2 sensor in the cabin like some other cars ...
 
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So, I did another test with the CO2 monitor with the driver side rear seat folded down (i.e. a large opening into the trunk with the exhaust flaps), though with only one person in the car this time. The results were almost exactly the same. The CO2 concentration with recirculation climbed to about 1250ppm, and again dropped to about ~600ppm after turning off recirculation. Looks like the cover has basically no impact on cabin ventilation.
 
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I drove my usual route to work this morning. There is still some tire noise and hum on certain roads, but directionally the trunk insulation does help reduce noise from the rear. Not a huge difference, but more than just a placebo effect. Certainly worth $75 and 15 minutes of time...
I've got one for $62 direct from Ali.
 
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Could it be used with the trunk shield? Anything to prevent them from being installed together? I was thinking about getting the trunk shield, covering it with Dynamat, and then putting the trunk mat on top of that for maximum sound proofing. Thoughts?
 

Madmolecule

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I finally installed the Trunk and Wheel Well Insulation. Both were pretty easy to install. I did remove the wheels. You might be able to do it with the wheels on but I don't think I could have worked around the wheel. I can't really tell any difference. The video is inconclusive or a minor difference. I did not install the Trunk liner due to the subwoofer, which it may or may not affect. If the front ones made a big difference I would have given it a try. If interested in the trunk liner PM me and I will send it to you.

For the test:

stereo level: 0
Fan speed manual Level: 4
Auto-pilot 50mph

Funk and Wheel Well Insulation
 
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I finally installed the Trunk and Wheel Well Insulation. Both were pretty easy to install. I did remove the wheels. You might be able to do it with the wheels on but I don't think I could have worked around the wheel. I can't really tell any difference. The video is inconclusive or a minor difference. I did not install the Trunk liner due to the subwoofer, which it may or may not affect. If the front ones made a big difference I would have given it a try. If interested in the trunk liner PM me and I will send it to you.

For the test:

stereo level: 0
Fan speed manual Level: 4
Auto-pilot 50mph

Funk and Wheel Well Insulation
PM sent