Model 3 SR+ Insurance quote and home charging - Ontario, Canada.

Jen

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#1
Hello everyone!

Sooo the process officially begins. I have been tracking the progress of the Model 3 since it was announced, during the delivery event live stream I decided that would be my next car. Since then I have continued to save, learn, and watch its progress. I haven't ordered yet, but I will soon. Right now I am getting the ball rolling on getting my SR+

I started hunting around for insurance quotes, contacted Duliban and they came back with a quote from SGI Canada for about $196/month with 2 million collision, $500 deductible, and full replacement value. That is $44 up from what I am paying for my 2010 Cobalt :p

Is anyone else with SGI Canada? What has your experience been? I have never heard them.

Next is to contact an electrician to get a quote for home charging. My brother (electrical engineer) took a look at it recently. He said it looks like (he couldn't see the incoming cable well) I have 200A service but a 100A panel, so I'll likely need to upgrade the panel that is also full. Or I could possibly have a pony panel installed to free up some room. No pool or anything that draws big power. Just regular HVAC, stove, fridge, washer, and dryer. I plan to only charge at night. It's at least a 50' run from the panel to the garage.
I'm not sure which is cheaper/better, buying the wall connector with the NEMA 14-50 plug (if it's still available) or the hardwired one. I might be moving in about 5 years so maybe the wall connector with the 14-50 plug might be a better idea?

The learning curve continues.

FYI I live in East of Toronto.
 

Frully

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#2
Hardwired wall connector with 60+ amp circuit = 48 amp charging for LR m3. SR only needs a 32A charge (40A breaker) but isn't very future proof.
The 14-50 kneecaps your future expand-ability but is easiest to take your hardware with you. That's for you to decide. (Having a WC ready might increase your house value equally).
The wall connector is no longer sold in the wall-plug variant. You'd have to wire that yourself with an appliance cord. Legality may vary.

SGI does good work, saskatchewan general. No idea how well their federal counterpart works.

I'm with insureMyTesla referral (from tesla) to Aviva insurance. So far so good. It's cheaper to insure my full-featured M3D than it was to insure my $10,000 miata. They have other features like underwriting the charger itself in case that toasts my house.
 

garsh

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#3
The 14-50 kneecaps your future expand-ability but is easiest to take your hardware with you.
It doesn't have to.

When I installed my NEMA 14-50 outlet, I made sure the wiring could handle 60 amps. When I got a Wall Connector later, it was pretty simple to swap the 50 amp breaker for a 60 amp breaker, and remove the outlet to replace it with the WC. Breakers and outlets cost ~$10 each - it's the wiring (and the work to install the wiring) that's expensive.
 

Frully

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#4
It doesn't have to.

When I installed my NEMA 14-50 outlet, I made sure the wiring could handle 60 amps. When I got a Wall Connector later, it was pretty simple to swap the 50 amp breaker for a 60 amp breaker, and remove the outlet to replace it with the WC. Breakers and outlets cost ~$10 each - it's the wiring (and the work to install the wiring) that's expensive.
Someone else mentioned elsewhere that it might be against code to de-rate the breaker on a higher current setup (which I believe to be a dubious claim but I'm not certified to claim anything)... Agreed you can make the run itself future proof while just capping it with lower rated bits.
 

MelindaV

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#5
Someone else mentioned elsewhere that it might be against code to de-rate the breaker on a higher current setup (which I believe to be a dubious claim but I'm not certified to claim anything)... Agreed you can make the run itself future proof while just capping it with lower rated bits.
i think what you are thinking of, or the quote you are thinking of, is if a 60A breaker was powering the 14-50 (50A receptacle). but there is nothing saying you can't up the wiring between the 50A breaker and the 50A receptacle, which is what @garsh mentioned doing.
 

Frully

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#6
i think what you are thinking of, or the quote you are thinking of, is if a 60A breaker was powering the 14-50 (50A receptacle). but there is nothing saying you can't up the wiring between the 50A breaker and the 50A receptacle, which is what @garsh mentioned doing.
I think it was the opposite where someone recently posted it was against (ontario?) code to put a 30A breaker on a 50A receptacle, as a non-smart charger (eg if someone plugged in an oven or dryer) would blow the breaker all the time.
 

MelindaV

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#7
I think it was the opposite where someone recently posted it was against (ontario?) code to put a 30A breaker on a 50A receptacle, as a non-smart charger (eg if someone plugged in an oven or dryer) would blow the breaker all the time.
would agree - that would not be something done here either, at least by a professional or someone knowing what they are doing. sorry - thought you specifically meant the larger wiring alone.