Model 3/S, Bolt EV, and Ioniq Efficiency Test - Model 3 Wins

Gavyne

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#1
Bjorn just posted a video where they tested the efficiency ratings on Model 3, Model S, Chevy Bolt EV, and Hyundai Ioniq. Very interesting since this is a test of the most efficient EV's on the market today. They had multiple Model 3 trims with different wheel sizes so those interested in knowing how wheel sizes effect efficiency, you should definitely take a look.



Spoiler: Model 3 LR with 18" wheels was the most efficient.
 

iChris93

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#2
Any info on the Hyundai Kona EV? Not available in NA but the efficiency seems impressive.
 

iChris93

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Final results:

View attachment 20829

The biggest surprise is that a Stealth Performance was more efficient than a RWD with 19" wheels.
With only 1% difference, that could be accounted for in a lot of different things from the tire rubber to color of the car.

(Disclaimer: I did not watch the video so I do not know what the HVAC settings were)
 

FRC

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#5
How about Stealth Performance w/18's more efficient than AWD(non-performance) w/18's? That seems inexplicable to me and throws these results into the "highly suspicious" category.
 

garsh

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#6
How about Stealth Performance w/18's more efficient than AWD(non-performance) w/18's? That seems inexplicable to me and throws these results into the "highly suspicious" category.
That just supports the fact that they're the exact same car running different software.

EDIT - I should have also mentioned that the difference (255 Wh/mi vs 244 Wh/mi) is less than 1%. That's a negligible difference - this wasn't a very well "controlled" experiment, remember. They did a good job given the lack of a test track - I'm not knocking their methodology. But the point is that the results are basically equivalent.
 
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DR61

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#7
How about Stealth Performance w/18's more efficient than AWD(non-performance) w/18's? That seems inexplicable to me and throws these results into the "highly suspicious" category.
With the same wheel/tire combo, when driven at the same speeds for economy, they should be identical. Difference in (less than 5%) this case was probably mostly due to the drivers.
 

Jim H

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#8
How about Stealth Performance w/18's more efficient than AWD(non-performance) w/18's? That seems inexplicable to me and throws these results into the "highly suspicious" category.
Is it possible that the Stealth Model 3 does actually have better motors, that are more efficient? It was reported that the performance cars do have the best motors, which explain this. I realize many feel the performance models is just a software change, but Musk did say the performance cars do get the best motors. If the motors are better, than maybe more efficient too?
 

garsh

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Is it possible that the Stealth Model 3 does actually have better motors, that are more efficient? It was reported that the performance cars do have the best motors, which explain this. I realize many feel the performance models is just a software change, but Musk did say the performance cars do get the best motors. If the motors are better, than maybe more efficient too?
That could be. I wouldn't expect there to be much difference, and there certainly isn't much difference in this case. But I think there's also a simpler explanation:
EDIT - I should have also mentioned that the difference (255 Wh/mi vs 244 Wh/mi) is less than 1%. That's a negligible difference - this wasn't a very well "controlled" experiment, remember. They did a good job given the lack of a test track - I'm not knocking their methodology. But the point is that the results are basically equivalent.