Model 3 Replacement Tire Discussion (OEM sizes only)

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Feathermerchant

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#61
I've read that runflats impact comfort as they are heavy. I carry a compressor and plugging kit.
I had 20" wheels but replaced them with forged 18's and appropriately sized tires and the ride is much better. Those 20" wheels weigh 28lb. My 18 weigh about 18lb.
 

RichP3D

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#62
so, maybe i'll avoid runflats. but i'd rather not have to buy new wheels and just stick with the 20" stock wheels. any all-seasons that might be recommended?
 

Feathermerchant

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#63
Look on tire rack. They have a great selection.
Or call your local Discount tire. They are a pretty good outfit.

Another reason I changed wheels is that I found I had about 1 3/4" from the edge of the rim to the concrete. Many here have come to grief by running thru a pothole and either destroying the tire or the wheel and tire. I wanted more sidewall. Part of the improved ride comes from an increased sidewall.

 

mswlogo

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#64
FYI, I just got my new tires installed at Costco. The OE Continental tires had bubbles in the sidewalls on both sides on 3 of them and they were noisy as hell.
I got the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack in OE size for the OEM 19" rims.
I have only, yet, driven on them for ~50 miles, but they are so much quieter that the original Conti's and feel much smoother and calmer for everyday driving. So, Continental can suck it with the foam in the tires which are completely useless.
One other detail, they seem to have a bit of lip around the rim that protrudes much more than the Conti's did to better protect from curb rash.

Also, Costco's warranty is far better than anything OEM would ever give you for tires as Tesla wasn't even interested in covering any of these since bubbles in the sidewall are considered to be caused by road hazards and not manufacturers defects. Costco also, by default, inflates tires with Nitrogen. I know this has been covered in many discussions and many claim it to be of negligible benefit, but the frequent and wide temperature swings here in Atlanta, it makes a huge difference in reducing inflation pressure variations.


View attachment 27488 View attachment 27489
Thanks for the report, I was curious about those tires. I'll bet you see a huge gain in efficiency too. I believe the Pirelli P7+ is very similar to the Bridgestone QuietTrack.

I knew those OEM Continentals were crap, that's why I ended up buying new OEM 19" Rims without tires so I didn't waste a dime on the Continentals.

So many people think just because Tesla chose them they are the best tire.
 

PaulK

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#65
FYI, I just got my new tires installed at Costco. The OE Continental tires had bubbles in the sidewalls on both sides on 3 of them and they were noisy as hell.
I got the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack in OE size for the OEM 19" rims.
I have only, yet, driven on them for ~50 miles, but they are so much quieter that the original Conti's and feel much smoother and calmer for everyday driving. So, Continental can suck it with the foam in the tires which are completely useless.
One other detail, they seem to have a bit of lip around the rim that protrudes much more than the Conti's did to better protect from curb rash.

Also, Costco's warranty is far better than anything OEM would ever give you for tires as Tesla wasn't even interested in covering any of these since bubbles in the sidewall are considered to be caused by road hazards and not manufacturers defects. Costco also, by default, inflates tires with Nitrogen. I know this has been covered in many discussions and many claim it to be of negligible benefit, but the frequent and wide temperature swings here in Atlanta, it makes a huge difference in reducing inflation pressure variations.


View attachment 27488 View attachment 27489

I’m curious if you notice a difference in your efficiency.

I will definitely consider these for my 18” wheels, the OEM Michelin’s are wearing out much too soon.
 

mswlogo

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#66
I’m curious if you notice a difference in your efficiency.

I will definitely consider these for my 18” wheels, the OEM Michelin’s are wearing out much too soon.
They don’t make that size tire in the Tesla specified load range (98). The Primacy is actually one of the best tires in that size. The 98 load range on 18” kind of limits your choices. There are folks that have got plenty of tread life out of the Primacy tires. It’s more likely you than the tire :)

He will likely see an improvement over his crappy Continental’s. The Primacy is already on the higher end of the efficiency spectrum. There isn’t as much room to improve that for you. Especially any tire that meets spec.

See Tirerack to check which tires are compatible with your car and size. They only list tires that are compatible according to the manufacturer.

Now some folks here will tell you ignoring the Tesla spec load range is fine. If you don’t mind risking liability or warranty on the car or tires you can put what ever you want. Many tire shops will not install tires out of spec.
 
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PaulK

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#67
They don’t make that size tire in the Tesla specified load range (98). The Primacy is actually one of the best tires in that size. The 98 load range on 18” kind of limits your choices. There are folks that have got plenty of tread life out of the Primacy tires. It’s more likely you than the tire :)

He will likely see an improvement over his crappy Continental’s. The Primacy is already on the higher end of the efficiency spectrum. There isn’t as much room to improve that for you. Especially any tire that meets spec.

See Tirerack to check which tires are compatible with your car and size. They only list tires that are compatible according to the manufacturer.

Now some folks here will tell you ignoring the Tesla spec load range is fine. If you don’t mind risking liability or warranty on the car or tires you can put what ever you want. Many tire shops will not install tires out of spec.
Thank you for pointing that out.

I was searching by tire size, not by model.

I notice that on the Bridgestone site, this tire does not come up as compatible with the 19” model 3s either.
 

android04

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#68
They don’t make that size tire in the Tesla specified load range (98). The Primacy is actually one of the best tires in that size. The 98 load range on 18” kind of limits your choices. There are folks that have got plenty of tread life out of the Primacy tires. It’s more likely you than the tire :)

He will likely see an improvement over his crappy Continental’s. The Primacy is already on the higher end of the efficiency spectrum. There isn’t as much room to improve that for you. Especially any tire that meets spec.

See Tirerack to check which tires are compatible with your car and size. They only list tires that are compatible according to the manufacturer.

Now some folks here will tell you ignoring the Tesla spec load range is fine. If you don’t mind risking liability or warranty on the car or tires you can put what ever you want. Many tire shops will not install tires out of spec.
Pretty soon I will need to replace my original 18" Michelin Primacy MXM tires and the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack are on the short list along with Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+.

I noticed that the Quiettrack in size 235/45R18 is not XL rated, but the 245/45R18 are. The only factor giving me pause is that the 235 tire has a UTQG of 800 but the 245 tire has a UTQG of "pending". Many point out XL is not necessary because the performance tires for model 3 are also not XL rated. But those tires also get damaged easier from hitting poles. This might mainly be a factor of the smaller sidewall, but load rating might have a small part to play. I'd rather stick to using an XL rated tire.
 

mswlogo

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#70
Thank you for pointing that out.

I was searching by tire size, not by model.

I notice that on the Bridgestone site, this tire does not come up as compatible with the 19” model 3s either.
Interesting. Both TireRack and Discount Tire List it as compatible for 19” Model 3. That Bridgestone tire is still pretty new.
 

Mosess

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#71
Also the tire shop may not install the non-XL tire. I'd buy the 245 size. It's what I have on my car.
I would not recommend anything wider than 235.
The difference between regular and 'eco' tires are the fit and belt rigidity. The eco tires for the same width actually have a slightly smaller road-contact area which is why they seem stretched over the rim. And the belts are more rigid so that the treat is less squishy and rolls with much less resistance under load.

Since installing my new tires, I've noticed efficiency averaging ~304wh/mi (currently at 341mi) whereas before it was ~285wh/mi. So for a slight drop in efficiency, I get a dramatically quieter ride (I am a audio engineer and used to do sound design for broadway shows in NYC) though I never measured it, it sounds as if the crazy loud rumble at ~350hz to ~1.2khz is gone and remaining is only a slight ring at ~300hz at highway speeds which sounds like it could be mitigated if one were to add a good closed cell foam layer inside the tire, something I do not have the time to bother with.

So switching to non eco-focused tires will already give you a better road contact area for the same width. As for load capacity, the difference between OE tires and the 98 load rating is only around 100lbs and since I got mine at Costco, they will cover me for any pre-mature wear or tires failure.
 

mswlogo

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#72
I would not recommend anything wider than 235.
The difference between regular and 'eco' tires are the fit and belt rigidity. The eco tires for the same width actually have a slightly smaller road-contact area which is why they seem stretched over the rim. And the belts are more rigid so that the treat is less squishy and rolls with much less resistance under load.

Since installing my new tires, I've noticed efficiency averaging ~304wh/mi (currently at 341mi) whereas before it was ~285wh/mi. So for a slight drop in efficiency, I get a dramatically quieter ride (I am a audio engineer and used to do sound design for broadway shows in NYC) though I never measured it, it sounds as if the crazy loud rumble at ~350hz to ~1.2khz is gone and remaining is only a slight ring at ~300hz at highway speeds which sounds like it could be mitigated if one were to add a good closed cell foam layer inside the tire, something I do not have the time to bother with.

So switching to non eco-focused tires will already give you a better road contact area for the same width. As for load capacity, the difference between OE tires and the 98 load rating is only around 100lbs and since I got mine at Costco, they will cover me for any pre-mature wear or tires failure.
I’m averaging 232 wh/mi AWD 19” OEM RIM with some AC and my tires are quieter than the prior 18” Primacy (1200 miles so far). And they are the proper load rating.

I don’t give a hoot about voiding tire warranty by running out spec tires. I care about liability in the event of a blow out (for any reason) and someone gets hurt and insurance finds out I was running tires out of spec.

TireShops won’t install them because they don’t want insurance companies coming after them.
 

Thunder7ga

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#73
I have the 18's and am about a month out from the need to replace the OEMs...want something that is similar but has better tread wear.....suggestions?
 

Thunder7ga

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#75
I am looking at the CONTINENTAL EXTREME CONTACT DWS 06. The main decision I have for my standard rims is stick with 235s or go to 245s. Not sure HOW much range impact that would be (a few % doesn't really matter to me) as this is 99% of the time just a daily driver Super-commuter (140+ miles a workday).
 
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Elphie2983

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#76
Looking for recommendations for new tires for Model 3 LR RWD 18" stock Aerowheel tires...

I'll start with this:
1. Performance / Handling (we live in Northeast in NY, lots of snow)
2. Range / Low rolling resistance
3. Tread wear / Durability
4. Ride Comfort
5. Low noise
6. Cost

But it's really hard to rank my preferences...i just want good tires that won't destroy my range, but will still have good handling in the snow (preference is for all weather tires)

Looking at what's available on tirerack for my car it says the michelin crossclimate is good as well as the vredestein quatrac 5...or do I just stick with the primacys? I do like to accelerate ;) But not like...all the time :) I'm at about 15K, and tesla said my tread is pretty low so...here we are :shrug
 

TMK26

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#77
I was just at my local service center (recently opened in upstate NY!!) for a tire rotation and a couple other minor (while I'm there anyway) items. I have an AWD with 13.5k miles (tires were never rotated). It turned out that the rears were at 3mm, while the fronts are at 6mm. Wasn't woth rotating since the rears are prettry much useless. So I ended up buying 2 new OEM (18") tires for the rear. $700! I'll be rotating this time to be sure all 4 wear out at the same time. Then I'll probably buy somthing that lasts a bit longer.
 

P4594spa

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#78
Michelin makes a variety tire supposedly designed for EVs (energy save a/s) . It comes in the standard 18" tire for Tesla 3. Would it give any additional range over the standard OEM supplied Michelin tire? They are 94V's so they are probably can handle the load
 
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#79
I was just at my local service center (recently opened in upstate NY!!) for a tire rotation and a couple other minor (while I'm there anyway) items. I have an AWD with 13.5k miles (tires were never rotated). It turned out that the rears were at 3mm, while the fronts are at 6mm. Wasn't woth rotating since the rears are prettry much useless. So I ended up buying 2 new OEM (18") tires for the rear. $700! I'll be rotating this time to be sure all 4 wear out at the same time. Then I'll probably buy somthing that lasts a bit longer.
I literally just posted almost the exact same specs!
What perplexes me is that the rear wore to "3", while the fronts only wore to "6". Every tire shop that I spoke with indicated that if anything it should be the other way around.

  • Did they explain why the rear would have worn out first?

The weight distribution is about 52/48, so it'd be unlikely that is the issue. I'm thinking a torque differential, but haven't rally seen anything to indicate a significant power variance with the AWD.
 

TMK26

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#80
I literally just posted almost the exact same specs!
What perplexes me is that the rear wore to "3", while the fronts only wore to "6". Every tire shop that I spoke with indicated that if anything it should be the other way around.

  • Did they explain why the rear would have worn out first?

The weight distribution is about 52/48, so it'd be unlikely that is the issue. I'm thinking a torque differential, but haven't rally seen anything to indicate a significant power variance with the AWD.
The service tech said the reason for the rear wear was mostly due to the high torque along with the weight (heavy) of the car. The tire compound (softer) made it wear out quicker, too.