Model 3 Longevity

styleruk

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#1
I have now taken delivery of my fantastic car and will aim to keep her for 10years. My question is, what advice can anyone give to improve the longevity of the car.

1) I thought of wrapping the car, at first I was going to go for a complete new colour, but overspent when I bought the car so don't have the £1200 spare currently, so it might be something I do in a few months. I do have the option to clear coat the front though, so that's an idea.
2) On my BMW motorbike (99,000 miles and going strong), for winter I used to spray this goop onto the metal parts to protect it against winter damp, then wash it off in the spring. For my classic car, I sprayed underseal in the arches etc, but I certainly don't want to do that! Is there a product that I could coat the metal parts, link arms etc to protect them that anyone knows about?
3) Screen protector. That's an obvious one, I've thought about this and have never fitted a screen protector to my smart phones and I never damage the screen. Had my pixel for over 3 years now and it's perfect. I always put a protector on my tablets as the keyboards that close on them always trap something, so I thought I won't put a protector on the car screen. But then, why not, it's cheap to do and should not affect the usage and if someone wipes their hand across with a diamond, I'll be seriously cheesed off. So I will do that.
4) Yucky shiny centre console, an obvious must. I will cover that.
5) Rubbers, after a couple of years I'll probably treat all the rubbers. There's a product I use that is simple to apply and it keeps them fresh over time. But there's nothing I can do right now...I think.
6) I'm a believer in spraying a bit of WD40 in certain areas, obviously, there are areas you stay clear of. But I like to look around and find electrical connections (lower power), and maybe I'll look into giving them areas a quick spray to avoid damp over time. Currently I've only lifted the under bonnet (hood), panel to look at the battery there. I will apply some grease to that, but not look at other areas yet. I can't help myself and will investigate (carefully). Corroded connectors (12v), are a pain, so it's simple to avoid.
7) Saw a video of someones boot (trunk) leaking water when opened after a down pour. Guess this is a good thing that it drains out, but begs a question of what water is left in these panels. Not sure what can be done to prevent long term rust here yet.
8) Mud flaps, have heard they keep the crap out of the arches and small gaps. I'll look into those.


Currently fitting a 2 post lift in my garage, so that will be handy in lifting the tesla up and doing a fairly good job, so I don't mind getting my hands dirty. I'm more concerned about the steel areas and what to use to ensure they last a long time, especially in UK where like a lot of places, in winter they throw tons of salt (not salt but has similar effect) on the roads and it gets to cars in the end. I always wash it off with cold water (never warm), each week. But there must be more I can do.

So if anyone can add more things to think about, I'd be interested.

Thank you.
 
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tesla m3

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#2
PPF > Wrap for protection.

Mud guards will help for the kick panels.

If you want to help longevity, read up on lithium battery care and figure out your charging points. For me, it's 65% daily charges and 90% on weekends that contain a trip.
 

styleruk

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#3
Mud flaps, a good point, I'll add that to the list. Also doing the charge thing. My commute is 35miles each way and I charge at work, so doing 75% charge max, Friday up to 90%.
 

tesla m3

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#4
I did full PPF on the front of the car - bumper, headlights, fog lights, full hood, full front fenders, A pillers. The car is so low slung that everything can be hit by rocks. I already have a few small rock chips in the windshield :/
 

styleruk

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#5
I did full PPF on the front of the car - bumper, headlights, fog lights, full hood, full front fenders, A pillers. The car is so low slung that everything can be hit by rocks. I already have a few small rock chips in the windshield :/
Sounds like you need a screen protector for the screen...wait, is that a thing? :)
 

zosoisnotaword

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#6
You can't drop the display or put it in your pocket with keys, so I've never understood the need for a screen protector. Maybe if you have drag queen fingernails or rambunctious kids who are regular passengers in the front seat. I have no scratches on mine after 16 months, but I don't have kids or drag tendencies.

If it's within your budget, a ceramic coating will make the car significantly easier to clean, will prevent micro-scratches from washing, and will keep the rubber and plastic parts looking new. My paint still looks showroom quality except for rock chips. I wash the car regularly and have absolutely zero swirls or micro-scratches.
 

styleruk

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#7
You can't drop the display or put it in your pocket with keys, so I've never understood the need for a screen protector. Maybe if you have drag queen fingernails or rambunctious kids who are regular passengers in the front seat. I have no scratches on mine after 16 months, but I don't have kids or drag tendencies.

If it's within your budget, a ceramic coating will make the car significantly easier to clean, will prevent micro-scratches from washing, and will keep the rubber and plastic parts looking new. My paint still looks showroom quality except for rock chips. I wash the car regularly and have absolutely zero swirls or micro-scratches.
16months, that's a good measure, so you have no coating but have managed to maintain the paintwork so far. I'd imagine 7 or 8 years it would start to tire like most cars would. As for screen, yes, I agree, I'm never going to damage it, I look after tech very well. But if the wife was to borrow it or use the screen, there's a possibility her engagement or eternal ring which has hard jewels would run across it, for a £20 screen protector, I feel it necessary. 99% of the time I'll be driving, so it's fine.
 

MelindaV

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#8
I bought a screen protector before the car - and have not yet installed it. 11 months later, the screen still looks brand new. Fingerprints wipe off easily, glare isn't an issue, and haven't seen any other reason to bother with the screen protector.
 

Mr. Spacely

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#9
You are over thinking this a bit. Charge the battery properly and perhaps buy a $40 ceramic coating product for the front that you apply yourself like a wax. Just repaint the car if it looks bad in 7-8 years (and you still like the car vs. the newest Y or pickup or "Model 007")
 

Mesprit87

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#10
+1 for mud flaps and ASAP.
I don't know why but a few 1000 kms and you'll find light scratches on the rockers and doors.
Wrap at least that shinny bumper and the rockers/lower part of the door.
You can also have a look at our rustproofing thread... get those trunk bumper pads studs treated before they rust like thay all seem to do;)
 

styleruk

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#11
You are over thinking this a bit. Charge the battery properly and perhaps buy a $40 ceramic coating product for the front that you apply yourself like a wax. Just repaint the car if it looks bad in 7-8 years (and you still like the car vs. the newest Y or pickup or "Model 007")
I tend to keep my cars for a long time. I do all the service and fixes on my motorbike and have had that nearly 15years, my classic car I used to commute with and have done around 150k miles in that. I'm all for preventative maintenance. I have a mercedes based motorhome (RV), a dab of grease here and spray of WD40 there will keep gremlins at bay over a long time and it does pay off. I understand if you are only keeping it for a few years of course, but I'd rather invest small amounts now to benefit over time. I put 65k miles on my Smart Electric drive, when I sold it, they tested the batteries...they were perfect. I would hope in 10 years when I do sell it, there will be no serious rust issues underneath etc. But each to our own. Maybe a compromise in cost would be a self fit front wrap, I'll look into that. Cheers.
 

styleruk

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#12
+1 for mud flaps and ASAP.
I don't know why but a few 1000 kms and you'll find light scratches on the rockers and doors.
Wrap at least that shinny bumper and the rockers/lower part of the door.
You can also have a look at our rustproofing thread... get those trunk bumper pads studs treated before they rust like thay all seem to do;)
did not know there was a rust proofing thread. cheers.
 

styleruk

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#13
+1 for mud flaps and ASAP.
I don't know why but a few 1000 kms and you'll find light scratches on the rockers and doors.
Wrap at least that shinny bumper and the rockers/lower part of the door.
You can also have a look at our rustproofing thread... get those trunk bumper pads studs treated before they rust like thay all seem to do;)
I am thinking of these...
 

Lovesword

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#14
If it's within your budget, a ceramic coating will make the car significantly easier to clean, will prevent micro-scratches from washing, and will keep the rubber and plastic parts looking new. My paint still looks showroom quality except for rock chips. I wash the car regularly and have absolutely zero swirls or micro-scratches.
+1 on the ceramic coating. I can't believe I waited as long as I did to do it... I was on the fence, figured what benefits would I get from it? Well... crazy easy to clean is just the tip of the iceberg (and I'm talking bird dropping, bugs, road grime, you name it). It just comes clean with a bucket of water with a little ONR (Optimum No Rinse) and some high quality microfibers.
The car just SHINES too. Here is a post I wrote up with some pictures of my car, which keep in mind was delivered February 2018 and so has been through two Iowa winters. :)
 

zosoisnotaword

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#16
16months, that's a good measure, so you have no coating but have managed to maintain the paintwork so far.
Not sure if this was a typo, but just to clarify, I do have Ceramic Pro on my car. I was pointing out that the coating has prevented all the normal paint issues on my car and makes it stupid-easy to clean.
 

styleruk

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#17
Not sure if this was a typo, but just to clarify, I do have Ceramic Pro on my car. I was pointing out that the coating has prevented all the normal paint issues on my car and makes it stupid-easy to clean.
Ah, OK. So you have the coating. Wonder what the paint would look like normally then.
 

MelindaV

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#19
Ah, OK. So you have the coating. Wonder what the paint would look like normally then.
for various reasons I didn't get around to doing my ceramic coating until June (car delivered last September), here's a pix that in late March, so prior to polishing and applying the coating. The paint can look great without coating, but the coating certainly makes keeping the car clean easier.

img_2347-jpeg.28625

img_2343-jpeg.28626