Model 3 Aero Wheel Range Benefits

TJ21

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#1
Hi all - I wanted to create a thread for people to report any data about the range benefits of the aero wheels vs the 19 inch sport wheels. This would really help many of us make configuration decisions with our M3's!
 

SoFlaModel3

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#2
I love the idea for the thread and do not want to discourage it or any feedback that comes in from our early owners, but I’m fearful you will have to take it with a grain of salt (maybe with a large enough sample of course the outliers will be filtered out).

My rationale is that there is such a big dependency on multiple factors:
- Climate
- Driving Style
- Car Load
 

Troy

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#3
Hi. This is what the theoretical data shows based on dyno coefficients in EPA documents. If you look at the last column, at highway speeds the difference is slightly less but still just over 10%. These numbers are without the aero covers on. With the aero covers, the difference should be more, probably somewhere between 17-19%.

I'm curious to find out if real-world tests show similar numbers but I haven't seen that kind of data for the Model S/X either. If that data was available, we could compare it to the theoretical Model S/X numbers because we do have the dyno coefficients for the Model S and X with different wheels as well. I could create the same table for the S/X and then compare that to real-world data to see if the theoretical data is reliable.

 
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jsmay311

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#4
I love the idea for the thread and do not want to discourage it or any feedback that comes in from our early owners, but I’m fearful you will have to take it with a grain of salt (maybe with a large enough sample of course the outliers will be filtered out).

My rationale is that there is such a big dependency on multiple factors:
- Climate
- Driving Style
- Car Load
Here's a (time-intensive) idea:

Two M3 owners -- one with 18" aeros and one with 19"s -- meet at a Supercharger location on a weekend (preferably a location that is known not to be busy). Both cars charge to 100% and note the displayed ranges. Then both go driving on a predetermined highway route of 200-250 miles (or so) that ends back at the original Supercharger location. Both cars drive at identical speeds, climate controls off, no drafting (keep a generous distance with any cars in front), and tires at recommended pressures.

At the end of the drive, compare the displayed miles remaining and any energy consumption data available on the M3. Then recharge back to 100% and compare kWh's consumed from each Supercharger (assuming this is displayed). (If possible, both use a stall that is not paired so charging rates are similar.)

And then... if you wanted to go one step further and make sure any subtle differences between the 2 cars/drivers are accounted for, swap wheels between the 2 vehicles and repeat the whole process.

Volunteers? Anyone? Bueller? ;)
 

Dan Detweiler

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#5
Here's a (time-intensive) idea:

Two M3 owners -- one with 18" aeros and one with 19"s -- meet at a Supercharger location on a weekend (preferably a location that is known not to be busy). Both cars charge to 100% and note the displayed ranges. Then both go driving on a predetermined highway route of 200-250 miles (or so) that ends back at the original Supercharger location. Both cars drive at identical speeds, climate controls off, no drafting (keep a generous distance with any cars in front), and tires at recommended pressures.

At the end of the drive, compare the displayed miles remaining and any energy consumption data available on the M3. Then recharge back to 100% and compare kWh's consumed from each Supercharger (assuming this is displayed). (If possible, both use a stall that is not paired so charging rates are similar.)

And then... if you wanted to go one step further and make sure any subtle differences between the 2 cars/drivers are accounted for, swap wheels between the 2 vehicles and repeat the whole process.

Volunteers? Anyone? Bueller? ;)
If I had my car I would totally be down for doing it!

As it is though, you are going to have to wait until early summer probably if you want this Georgia non-owner to participate. ;)

Dan
 

Thomas Mikl

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#6
Hi. This is what the theoretical data shows based on dyno coefficients in EPA documents. If you look at the last column, at highway speeds the difference is slightly less but still just over 10%. These numbers are without the aero covers on. With the aero covers, the difference should be more, probably somewhere between 17-19%.

I'm curious to find out if real-world tests show similar numbers but I haven't seen that kind of data for the Model S/X either. If that data was available, we could compare it to the theoretical Model S/X numbers because we do have the dyno coefficients for the Model S and X with different wheels as well. I could create the same table for the S/X and then compare that to real-world data to see if the theoretical data is reliable.

I think those numbers are total theory bogus and not even close to the real world. As it makes absolutely ZERO sense to have that 10% at 5mph where you have near to zero distortion and weight of the vehicle plays a major factor.
I think those numers would only be correct if you take the wheel (and wheel alone without a car) and spin it on a test bed. Then the 10% at 5mph make sense as the 18'' is considerably lighter.
 

danzgator

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#7
Here's a (time-intensive) idea:

Two M3 owners -- one with 18" aeros and one with 19"s -- meet at a Supercharger location on a weekend (preferably a location that is known not to be busy). Both cars charge to 100% and note the displayed ranges. Then both go driving on a predetermined highway route of 200-250 miles (or so) that ends back at the original Supercharger location. Both cars drive at identical speeds, climate controls off, no drafting (keep a generous distance with any cars in front), and tires at recommended pressures.

At the end of the drive, compare the displayed miles remaining and any energy consumption data available on the M3. Then recharge back to 100% and compare kWh's consumed from each Supercharger (assuming this is displayed). (If possible, both use a stall that is not paired so charging rates are similar.)

And then... if you wanted to go one step further and make sure any subtle differences between the 2 cars/drivers are accounted for, swap wheels between the 2 vehicles and repeat the whole process.

Volunteers? Anyone? Bueller? ;)
Even better, if they are both following a pace car with AutoPilot on 99.9% of the time, it takes out any user error.
 

Rich M

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#8
Didn't the latest software update add trip computers with mi/kWh display? I would use that.
Using two different cars is a bad idea due to different mileages and assembly differences.
 

EValuatED

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#9
Seeing interesting Aero cover performance articles from Teslarati (4% improvement in back to back testing with 18” wheels) and Electrek (re: aero cover & wheel design goals) today...
 

danzgator

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#11
Just want to clarify in case people think oh it's not 11% but just 4%. No that's not the case. The 4.4% difference is just with the aero covers. If you take the covers off, you consume 4.4% more energy with the 18" wheels. More details here.
And this is not a comparison between the 19" sport wheels and the aero wheels. That difference would presumably be more than 4.4%.
 

roflwaffle

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#12
Offhand, testing the Aero caps first would reduce their apparent reduction in drag if the car wasn't completely warmed up. There's also enough variability in even a test track to warrant multiple (7) bi-directional runs.

https://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f10/vss074_francfort_2012_o.pdf

IRL, there's probably more variability than that, as seen in this thread where the difference in coast down force can be as much as 50% between runs.

http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/coast-down-testing-2000-honda-insight-19859.html
 

AlexMol

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#13
Still waiting for a definitive answer on the Aero Wheels benefits. With more cars on the road, can some of you guys make that test with 2 cars driving the same route ?
Mine will only arrive in Mid-2019 (Europe base version)