Model 3 100% charge range

AEDennis

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#2
For the first time I charged my wife Tesla Model 3 to 100% using the provided Gen. 2 Mobile charger. The result: 307 miles listed of available range. If you own a Model 3, what did you get?
303 The first time...


304 the second time. Using the Gen 2 on one and a Gen 1 on the other using 208V 1phase feed.
 

Maevra

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#4
312- first time
310- second time
304- third time (after two week's worth of holiday driving, draining battery down to ~50 miles and recharging it via Superchargers exclusively to 90% every couple of days)
307- fourth time (not 100% fully charged, I had to leave when it was on its last 5-10 minutes)

All of these numbers were on the same 1st gen charger.
 
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Marco Papa

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#6
I should have mentioned that I never charged before the first upgrade and the firmware was at 2017.48.15 8812942 when I tried the first 100% charge.

Given that I see quite a few of 307 mi after initially higher numbers, maybe the latest updates reduced the max range to a lower value. I know this happened with my Model S, after eventually settling down.

I used the charger that came with the Model 3, known as Model S/X/3 Gen 2 Mobile Connector Bundle, connected with a dual breaker 240V / 50A line + NEMA 14-50 Adapter. I confirmed the 30 mi of range per hour of charge at 32 Amps of max output, as listed at Tesla.com
 
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Maevra

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#7
I should have mentioned that I never charged before the first upgrade and the firmware was at 2017.48.15 8812942 when I tried the first 100% charge.

Given that I see quite a few of 307 mi after initially higher numbers, maybe the latest updates reduced the max range to a lower value. I know this happened with my Model S, after eventually settling down.

I used the charger that came with the Model 3, known as Model S/X/3 Gen 2 Mobile Connector Bundle, connected with a dual breaker 240V / 50A line + NEMA 14-50 Adapter. I confirmed the 30 mi of range per hour of charge at 32 Amps of max output, as listed at Tesla.com
It could also be the software is calculating the range differently based on historical patterns and recent use.

My daily limit is set at 90% and I've seen it fluctuate as low as 274 and as high as 295 while charging on the same Gen1 charger. My first ever charge to 90% was 295 miles but quickly dropped down to 277, which is now what I consider my "normal" 90% level.

The two times I "balanced" (charged from a really low SoC to 100%), the pack has also bumped my 90% numbers up like so:

Charged to 100%- 312 | next time charging to 90%- 285 | following charge to 90%- 277
Charged to 100%- 310 | next time charging to 90%- 280 | following charge to 90%- 278

Hope that's not info overload, but it's fascinating how the range fluctuates.
 

jman

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#8
I know some of these places are in California but wonder what the temperatures have been. Here in Mass, I fully charged and lost 4.5 % degradation from new, 2015 build. But I know it will go up when the temps get higher than around or well below freezing....
 

m3_4_wifey

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#9
Is the car estimating how many miles you can get with a full battery based on the driving style since the last one or two charges? It would be interesting if there was a larger delta between someone who drives aggressively vs. someone who's always driving for maximum range.
 

Troy

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#10
Is the car estimating how many miles you can get with a full battery based on the driving style since the last one or two charges?
No. Tesla cars don't display available range based on driving style. They use a constant to convert Wh to miles. For example, the Model 3 LR has 78,270 Wh usable capacity and 310 miles EPA rated range. That means the car will display 1 mi per 252 Wh in the battery. Let's assume the car estimates that the battery has 50,000 Wh energy. In a Model 3 LR in the US, it would display 50,000 Wh/ 252Wh/mi= 198 miles rated range. It doesn't matter whether the car has the small wheels or large wheels. It doesn't matter whether you have driven at 80 mph or 50 mph recently. It will still display 198 mi. There are a few things that can change this number. If you charge the car at night and come back in the morning, the displayed range will drop slightly because of vampire loss. If you switch the range mode setting in a Model S/X, the displayed range will increase instantly (usually by ~3 miles). There is no range mode in the Model 3. If the weather is too cold, the displayed range at 100% will be slightly lower.

Each model has a different constant. For example, the Model S 75D has 73,200 Wh usable capacity and 259 miles rated range. It will display 1 miles range per 282 Wh. Therefore a Model S 75D in the US that has 50,000 Wh energy will display 50,000 Wh/ 282Wh/mi= 177 miles rated range. In addition Teslas in Europe and Asia have different constants and different 100% range numbers.

The inconsistency happens because it is difficult to estimate how much energy the battery holds. The car is constantly calculating an estimate. It calculates how much energy goes in and out of the battery. But this is not an exact measure. It is not like measuring data on a hard drive. The energy in the battery is based on chemical reactions. These are affected by temperature and the vampire loss makes the estimates less accurate over time. Besides the balance sheet method, the car also uses voltage to estimate how much energy the battery holds. However, the voltage in lithium-ion batteries is flat until the battery is almost empty. Therefore this doesn't help much except you get a warning message that says power reduced when the battery is almost empty. Also, be aware that the accuracy of the displayed range will get worse over time if you never get close to 0% or 100%.
 
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Michael Russo

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#12
Troy, awesome explanation. Thanks! A moderator should pick up your details and add it to one of the sticky messages.
Fatto, Marco!
Actually I made the thread sticky. Don’t really know how to add @Troy ’s details to the sticky ‘messages’. Maybe a smarter mod out there knows how to do that... ;)
 

3V Pilot

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#20
Showoff! :p

I think that's the highest reported Range charge that I can recall
I thought I read someone report 318 when they first got their car but I can't remember if it was here on another forum. OH NO....did I just admit I read other forums.....is that like internet adultery??.....oh the shame......:p:eek::D