Level 1 Charging

Twiglett

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Joined
Feb 8, 2017
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513
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Austin, Texas
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#21
L1 charging is possible for sure, but a real PITA.
I have a 50mile commute and a Leaf, if you're L1 charging you will have similar range to a Leaf depending on recharge time :)
L2 gives me the flexibility to drive further than the range of the little Leaf battery, so I wouldn't consider L1 a long term solution without additional charging options while driving around.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
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13
Location
San Jose, CA
Tesla Owner
Model 3
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#22
I agree with the 3-4 miles per hour if Level 1 on the M3. I've had mine now for 3 weeks and have tried level 1 and level 2. With level 1 I get about 3-4 miles per hour. It's about 40-50 degrees ambient when I do this (in the garage).

I also made a two headed plug to provide 240 into a level 2 charger and have used that for years with my Plug In Prius successfully. If you do that make sure you limit the charging current to something that will work.

Do you have a dryer in the garage? I also use a dryer outlet at times to give me 32A charging at 240V level 2. That works well also.
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
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18
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Bethesda, MD
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#23
Another option, since you already have L2 charging for your S, is to use the circuit sharing feature of the Tesla wall connector. In some scenarios it could end up being a more cost effective solution than running a new circuit from the electrical panel. Multiple wall connectors can be installed on the same circuit, and they are able to talk to each other and schedule charging without overloading the breaker.
I agree, circuit sharing is a great feature. My challenges are 1) I have a first generation Tesla HPWC, which I don't believe does circuit sharing, so having to buy and install 2 new chargers, and 2) not much room to conveniently place a second wall charger.

I'm now thinking, if I have the amps available in the secondary panel in the garage, to install whatever 240V circuit
fits (15-20A would be fine) and buy a mobile charging cable (possibly even a generic J1772 as we have an extra tesla adapter). That would be plenty to overnight-charge any possible use except long road trips and for that rare occasion, use the HPWC.
 
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#24
Well schucks RK! Since you already have a sub in the garage, if you have existing space in the sub, and if your load calcs allow, then a new NEMA 6-15 (rare, as it is) all the way up to a (but not a 10-30 if you want to remain code friendly) 6-50 or 14-50 should be a snap.

Up thread you showed a pic of a NEMA 5-20 receptacle. I would be mindful that you insure that said receptacle has the required 12ga. wire to support it and i would deploy a single pole 20amp circuit breaker. With that said, if that 120 receptacle is the sole outlet on that branch circuit or can be separated from other 120 outlets, a licensed electrician can easily change that branch circuit to 240v (again, assuming you have the space in your sub and the load calcs to support it to remain in code).

As always, one should always follow code and have licensed electrician perform such work.

fo sho a 5-20 charges more than 33% faster than a 5-15 since the extra 4amps is all charging whereas the first few amps power the cars systems

Good-luck!
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
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Bethesda, MD
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#25
This for the info, @Ms. Newbie Electrick! I've got a NEMA 5-20 adapter on its way from Tesla as I found a 5-20 outlet at work that I can park at. Getting a decent charge while working would be awesome.

And I'll take your advice and have an electrician figure out what to add to the panel. The NEMA 6-series has options for different amperages. And the Tesla store has all those adapters.
 
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13004

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#27
RK

Good to see that charge rate! Unfortunately, many folks over the years have frowned upon L1 charging (not fast enough, inefficient, blah blah) whereas I believe every owner should be armed with a UMC 5-20 along with several other adapters (great price point these days!) especially when their road tripping adventures take them deep into the wild. IMO, L1 charging is especially important in cold winter temps to help keep the pack warm while adding a few miles of range. I will be interested to know if warmer temps as you have mentioned along with a nice stiff 120+V input can achieve a very substantial ~7mph.