J.D. Powers on safety systems

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bwilson4web

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Source: U.S. Tech Experience Index (TXI) Study | J.D. Power

COSTA MESA, Calif.: 27 Aug. 2019 — Some alerts on Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are so annoying or bothersome that many drivers disable the systems and may try to avoid them on future vehicle purchases, according to the J.D. Power 2019 U.S. Tech Experience Index (TXI) Study,SM released today. This is a major concern for automakers keen to market these lucrative technologies and pave the way for more highly automated vehicles in the future.
. . .
A prime example of this is lane-keeping and centering systems. On average, 23% of customers with these systems complain that the alerts are annoying or bothersome. This ranges from just 8% for one domestic brand to more than 30% for a couple of import brands. For these owners, 61% sometimes disable the system, compared with just 21% of those that don’t consider the alerts annoying or bothersome. Owners wanting the feature on their next vehicle ranges from 63% for those that consider the alerts annoying or bothersome to 91% for those who do not.

My experience with Prius Prime, TSS-P, lane keep alert, matches this study. After enough 'nags', it would then suggest time to take a driving break. Worse, the 'nudge' back to lane if not checked would cross the other side. It had no controlled steering to the lane center.

In contrast, AutoPilot holds the center of the lane without a problem. The driver still monitors what is going on but more as an interested passenger than a harried driver. However, surveys of Tesla owners reveals about 20% don't like or trust AutoPilot and some are quite vociferous. Of course others may regret the loss of hand brakes, manual transmissions, and floor switch operated high/low beams.

Bob Wilson