In Home Charger - changed breakers, no change in Juice!

  • SUPPORT THE SITE AND ENJOY A PREMIUM EXPERIENCE!
    Welcome to Tesla Owners Online, four years young! For a low subscription fee, you will receive access to an ad-free version of TOO. We now offer yearly memberships! You can subscribe via this direct link:
    https://teslaownersonline.com/account/upgrades

    SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL!
    Did you know we have a YouTube channel that's all about Tesla? Lots of Tesla information, fun, vlogs, product reviews, and a weekly Tesla Owners Online Podcast as well!

Joined
Mar 21, 2019
Messages
13
Location
Maryland
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#1
I have an in-home (garage) charger.. I ran 6 gauge copper wire (good for up to 55 amps) and originally used a (pre-existing) 40 amp breaker. I installed the charger and (incorrectly) selected the # 8 on the rotary dial.. I was supposed to select 6 according to the manual. However, when I charge, I always got 32 amps, which is the correct draw (40 amps minus 20% for safety factor) for a 40 amp circuit.

I finally got around to purchasing a 50 amp breaker, and I looked at the dial and thought: "Huh, it's already set for a 50 amp breaker, according to the book". But when I charge, I still get 32/32 amps... I took the cover off (again) and selected number 9 (according to the book, this is the selection for a 60 amp breaker... I turned the power back on (I always turn it off before I take off the cover) and I'm *still* only getting 32 amps of charge.

Does anyone know if I'm doing something wrong? Should I wait and see what "the brain" of the charging system can figure out?

Thanks!

Chessie
 
Joined
Mar 21, 2019
Messages
13
Location
Maryland
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#3
Well sumbitch! I did not know this, and thank you for that update! I have the Mid-Range, and your chart shows it will only take 32 amp, so I'm very glad that I asked...

(I'm often reminded that I didn't pay for all of the options.. almost a second class citizen, but I still love this car!)

Thanks again!

Chessie
 

Frully

Top-Contributor
Joined
Aug 30, 2018
Messages
956
Location
Calgary, AB. Canada
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#4
Well sumbitch! I did not know this, and thank you for that update! I have the Mid-Range, and your chart shows it will only take 32 amp, so I'm very glad that I asked...

(I'm often reminded that I didn't pay for all of the options.. almost a second class citizen, but I still love this car!)

Thanks again!

Chessie
They had to have some cost savings somewhere...While technically a level 2 charger is still a very slow charge, it would be pushing the smaller battery pack harder to charge at the larger battery's rate. Best to keep a consistent C value and have predictable degradation across the fleet methinks.
 

JWardell

Legendary Member
Joined
May 9, 2016
Messages
3,892
Location
Boston
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#5
No worries. Unless you are using up your battery every day with a very long commute, 32 amps is fine for almost everyone. I only have 24amp, actually turn it down to 20amp in the summer, and never have an issue charging overnight.
 

JasonF

Top-Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2018
Messages
1,037
Location
Orlando FL
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#6
I tend to agree with JWardell. When you're supercharging, a longer charge time is annoying because you're waiting for it. If you're charging at home, and relaxing while the car charges, what difference is 30 minutes or less really going to make?


No worries. Unless you are using up your battery every day with a very long commute, 32 amps is fine for almost everyone. I only have 24amp, actually turn it down to 20amp in the summer, and never have an issue charging overnight.
Why do you turn it down to 20 amp in the summer?
 

JWardell

Legendary Member
Joined
May 9, 2016
Messages
3,892
Location
Boston
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#8
I tend to agree with JWardell. When you're supercharging, a longer charge time is annoying because you're waiting for it. If you're charging at home, and relaxing while the car charges, what difference is 30 minutes or less really going to make?




Why do you turn it down to 20 amp in the summer?
In an older house with 100 amp service, you have to be careful about charging and running the AC simultaneously.

Bwahaha 100 amps! My panel is only 60 Amps.

Yes, I installed a 30 amp breaker, but limit the car to 20 amps in the summer when AC might be running
 

Frully

Top-Contributor
Joined
Aug 30, 2018
Messages
956
Location
Calgary, AB. Canada
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#9
Bwahaha 100 amps! My panel is only 60 Amps.

Yes, I installed a 30 amp breaker, but limit the car to 20 amps in the summer when AC might be running
I'm in that boat essentially. 100A to house, 40A to the garage from there...20A on the garage panel for the car, 16A realistic charge. Could bump to 40A breaker for the car legally but that doesn't leave a lot of overhead for the garage door openers etc.

I really want to do a meter move, upgrading to 200A service direct to the garage (leaving expansion for the future of possible dual high current chargers), then backfeed the house with 100-200A leaving room for A/C and hot tub among other toys. I could of course afford this upgrade right up until I bought the M3 ;)
 

JasonF

Top-Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2018
Messages
1,037
Location
Orlando FL
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#10
If you take some time and install the wiring from the garage to the house, you can probably save a lot of money on that upgrade. Electricians tend to charge a lot more for stuff they don’t really like to do, like digging trenches outdoors.
 

kpedraja

Active member
Joined
Oct 16, 2018
Messages
40
Location
Seattle
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#11
In an older house with 100 amp service, you have to be careful about charging and running the AC simultaneously.
Welllll, ya. I had a 100 amp service and really wanted the full 48 amp charging capability (we have two electric cars and only 1 space to charge in). So I went a little nuts and had my service upgraded to 200 amps. We won't talk about the cost. (Though, to be fair, this was something I needed to do at some point anyway since my house had been converted from oil to electric heat some time in the 70s and the box was very nearly full. Getting the Tesla just pushed the decision up a little.)