How's your heater?

Prodigal Son

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#1
Either my heater doesn't work properly or my expectations are out of whack. If you crank it up to "HI", do you actually get hot air blowing? Mine's just a bit warmer than ambient, it feels like.
 

LucyferSam

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#5
I haven't paid too much attention to the air coming out of the vent (the reason I love the vent system is that I don't have to feel air coming out of the vent) but mine warms my car up quickly enough and it's barely gotten above freezing since Sunday. I'd definitely check in with a service center on what's going on.
 

TirianW

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#6
Heat pumps are notorious for only blowing warm air not hot air like a combustion or electric furnace. The air slightly warmer than the desired temperature but not "hot". It sounds like if you just run the climate control, it is only using the heat pump to heat the car, where as if you enable "oven mode" it forces the resistance heater on which blows "hot" air. So resistance heater - hot air, less efficient; heat pump - warm enough air, more efficient.
 

Prodigal Son

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#7
Heat pumps are notorious for only blowing warm air not hot air like a combustion or electric furnace. The air slightly warmer than the desired temperature but not "hot". It sounds like if you just run the climate control, it is only using the heat pump to heat the car, where as if you enable "oven mode" it forces the resistance heater on which blows "hot" air. So resistance heater - hot air, less efficient; heat pump - warm enough air, more efficient.
Oh hell did I miss that there's a heat pump AND a resistance heater? I had no idea.
 

TirianW

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#8
Oh hell did I miss that there's a heat pump AND a resistance heater? I had no idea.
The biggest difference between an air conditioner and a heat pump is the reversing valve (now, technically there are other differences, the expansion valves are different, sometimes there is a change to the receiver/drier, the control system is more complex), so it makes sense to just put a heat pump into the car. Some manufacturers "dumb down" the the heat pump to an air conditioner to make the "budget" versions of their cars (glaring at Nissan here), but technically the heat pump is not much more expensive than the air conditioner.
 

rxlawdude

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#10
Our 12/28 delivered M3 was taken on a road trip the next morning to Sedona and Flagstaff, where ambient temps were in the low 40s-60s.

The heat in the M3 not only was great, it was actually better than in my MS.
 

Prodigal Son

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#11
Our 12/28 delivered M3 was taken on a road trip the next morning to Sedona and Flagstaff, where ambient temps were in the low 40s-60s.

The heat in the M3 not only was great, it was actually better than in my MS.
Do you mind doing a test for me? If you use the app to set the heat to "HI" and run the climate control while not in your car, what temperature is the interior at after 5 minutes?
 

rxlawdude

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#12
Do you mind doing a test for me? If you use the app to set the heat to "HI" and run the climate control while not in your car, what temperature is the interior at after 5 minutes?
I'd have to do the test in SoCal balmy (relative) temps, so I will report on the interior temperature increase to make it a bit more scientific.

EDIT: Starting interior ambient 72F. Heat to HI at 1558. Ending interior ambient @ 1603: 82F. 10F rise in 5 min.
 
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Maevra

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#13
Update: Manually turning on the rear vents is an easter egg that enables Oven Simulator, apparently. Not sure why the rear vents need to be activated to make the FRONT vents throw hot air as well, though.
In my experience, if you're trying to blast the heat on HI after the car has been off for hours (ex. first thing in the morning), it'll take a while for the heat to come on at a standstill. Best thing to get it going quickly is to drive it.

I usually hop into the car when it shows interior temps at 50F. Since I forget to pre-heat often, I crank up the temps to 80F, but the first 5 minutes I'm driving at 10-30 mph the car doesn't heat up much. However, once on the freeway cruising at 60mph the heat REALLY gets going.
 
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Maevra

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#14
Update: Manually turning on the rear vents is an easter egg that enables Oven Simulator, apparently. Not sure why the rear vents need to be activated to make the FRONT vents throw hot air as well, though.
Hmm curious. Turning on the rear vents should actually DECREASE the heat you feel at the front since it's now splitting the air between front and back. Maybe ask the Tesla SC about that...
 

LucyferSam

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#15
Do you mind doing a test for me? If you use the app to set the heat to "HI" and run the climate control while not in your car, what temperature is the interior at after 5 minutes?
Just ran this test in me car, in 5 min it went from 59 to 79. It had been about 2 hours since parking it and plugging it in to change, outdoor ambient temperature is 36.
 

Prodigal Son

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#16
I'd have to do the test in SoCal balmy (relative) temps, so I will report on the interior temperature increase to make it a bit more scientific.

EDIT: Starting interior ambient 72F. Heat to HI at 1558. Ending interior ambient @ 1603: 82F. 10F rise in 5 min.
Interesting, same as I get up here in norcal. I suspect it won't go over 82 when remotely heating. Time to find new ways to test!
 

LucyferSam

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#17
Interesting, same as I get up here in norcal. I suspect it won't go over 82 when remotely heating. Time to find new ways to test!
Think I must have misread my clock last night, retested this morning with a timer set: 44F outdoor ambient, 42F in the car, after 5 minutes on high it was at 81. Definitely slowed down at 80 as that last degree took ~25 sec.
 
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NRG4All

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#19
No. You didn't. It would be news to everyone. (i.e., it's very likely not true.)
I agree with you. My understanding is that they use the windings in the driver motor to generate heat used to warm the cabin. They somehow have come up with a way to keep the armature still while sending current through the windings to create the heat. Of course, once you are under way, this heat is created naturally. Normally that heat, using a heat pump, would be lost. If it works in the long run, it seems like a very elegant solution.