How self sufficient are you regarding electricity at home?

What percentage of you generate or store your own electricity?

  • Just Solar PV installed (do not own or have an EV reservation)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Power generated via another method - wind, water etc (please explain below)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Just battery storage (powered from the grid, no EV or reservation for one)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Just battery storage (powered from the grid & an EV)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    41

Gizmo

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#1
I am curious as to how everyone else on M3OC intends to get their electricity for home and car.

Personally I have a reservation for the Model 3 (obviously) am interested in getting a second... which may well end up being a 1st :rolleyes: EV for the wife, and I’m also currently getting quotes for PV and battery storage, I’m in the UK.

(Please include your country so it gives a better picture)
 

SoFlaModel3

@Teslatunity
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#2
Good idea for the thread. You should add a poll!

I’m in the US (Florida) and fully dependent on the grid. I do plan on going with Solar and Powerwall in my next home though.
 

Jayc

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May 19, 2016
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#3
I guess up here in Scotland with limited sunlight, it is not a clear cut decision. If ROI is not a main consideration I'd say going with clean energy is the right thing to do in general.

BTW there are those who argue that going EV is pointless when power generation is not totally clean. I think these are two distinct problems that require different solutions. IMO eventually power generation will become clean so most of these are non issues.
 

Topher

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#6
I generate heat (some) and hot water with a solar thermal system, electricity with a grid tied PV system (for 100% of my electricity needs (probably)), and use the battery in my hybrid for emergency backup power (not counted as storage since it isn't a plug-in). I am in a 4.0 sun-hours per day of insolation, climate.

Thank you kindly.
 

BigBri

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#7
I'm considering putting a solar array on my roof in the next few years. I live in a townhouse but its pretty large and faces the east so it'd be pretty good. Would install some sort of a battery at the same time.

I've heard the grid argument many times. I feel that by shifting more demand to the grid that it'll quickly get even cleaner as all companies care about is dollars and cents and clean energy is quickly becoming the cheapest and quickest to install. Plus even if the station was burning regular gas to keep the lights on they're able to capture more energy from it then a fossil car ever could.
 

MelindaV

☰ > 3
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#8
There are a few things where I am against home solar. 1) the NW is not known for year round sun, 2) we have low cost grid electricity that is nearly entirely from renewable sources, 3) I have a skinny vertical house without much roof space.
 

skygraff

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#10
Recently received conflicting information (from the same company) about viability of PV on my garage for EV but also grid tied. Seeking more information before going to condo board.

I would love to charge my car off grid but have the option to access the grid if I need a quick and full charge. I'd also like to sell back whatever I produce which doesn't get stored in my future car or powerwall.
 

Topher

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#11
I would love to charge my car off grid but have the option to access the grid if I need a quick and full charge. I'd also like to sell back whatever I produce which doesn't get stored in my future car or powerwall.
Illinois is a net-metering state (at the moment), so you can sell back your excess.

Watch to see what a powerwall can do.

Thank you kindly.
 

skygraff

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#12
Illinois is a net-metering state (at the moment), so you can sell back your excess.

Watch to see what a powerwall can do.

Thank you kindly.
Much appreciated.

It isn't actually the Illinois aspect of the situation as it is the logistics of the wiring. Long story but, suffice to say, I have more faith in the first guy's opinion than the second one and hope the dream will one day be a reality.
 

Bokonon

Self-identified Teslaholic
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#14
No solar yet here, but we'll definitely be looking into a Tesla Solar Roof + Powerwall combo when our roof comes up for replacement in ~2022. Until then, we've switched our grid-power generation service to a provider that buys renewables.
 

teslaliving

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#16
I've got 47.1 kWh daily average production on my SolarCity panels. More than covers my daily charging needs for my car and then some :)

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 6.23.24 PM.jpg
 

Truav8r

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#17
Leaf is my wife's daily driver for the last 4 years, loves it. 9kw PV on the roof installed 2 years ago, powers home and car completely.

And M3 on reserve, of course
 

Nikola

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Apr 4, 2016
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Arizona
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#18
We have rooftop solar PV (in USA) and produce an average of 11,300 kWh per year, which is about 110% of our current annual use. In our state we have net metering, and since we generate more than we use each month (and it rolls over from month to month) our only cost is the monthly meter fee and taxes, which amount to about $15-18 per month.

However, once a year the local utility credits back our accumulated surplus at the wholesale rate (2.5 cents per kWh) to wipe the slate clean. That means that for a few months our bill is actually $0 until the credit is worked off. So far, so good.

With a Model 3 on reservation and anticipating an increase in our power needs, we attempted to work with Solar City to add some capacity to the rooftop PV we already have.

Unfortunately the numbers didn't work well. Expanding the solar array requires a new inverter (in our case) and we don't get the Federal tax credit again. The cost of a small expansion to the array was prohibitive.

The best course of action turned out to be "do nothing". Since the utility pays us a wholesale rate of 2.5 cents per kWh for the 10% surplus power we are generating, it's far more advantageous in our situation to use that surplus power ourselves, to charge the Model 3.

If the cost of keeping the car charged exceeds our 10% surplus power, we'll just pay the utility for the extra juice at $0.10/kWh. I estimate that it will probably amount to less than $30 per year.
 

Nikola

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#19
And I should mention: there's an extreme "cool factor" in being able to say your car is solar powered.

It's a handy rebuttal to those cavemen who like to bloviate about the "long tailpipe" theory that electric cars are somehow coal-powered.
 

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