Is your charging situation ready for Model 3 yet?

  • Yes

    Votes: 506 52.8%
  • No

    Votes: 366 38.2%
  • Haven't thought about it

    Votes: 8 0.8%
  • Don't know where 2 start

    Votes: 79 8.2%

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I have a 240-volt dryer circuit on a 30 amp breaker that I'm not using (I have a gas dryer) I was thinking putting in a Nema 15-40 on this 30 amp breaker to charge a model 3 long range. Here are my questions:

1) Will this work?

2) About how many miles of charge can I get off of this setup with a 30 amp breaker?

Thanks for the help.
I think you want a 60 amp breaker. That’s what I have. Charge at 29 mph.
 

garsh

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I have a 240-volt dryer circuit on a 30 amp breaker that I'm not using (I have a gas dryer) I was thinking putting in a Nema 15-40 on this 30 amp breaker to charge a model 3 long range.
Buy the NEMA 14-30 adapter for your mobile charger
https://shop.tesla.com/us/en/product/vehicle-accessories/gen-2-nema-adapters.html

If you don't already have a NEMA 14-30 outlet on that circuit, change it to one.
The 14-30 outlet looks almost the same as the 14-50 - just a different neutral connector.

If your house is older, and has a NEMA 10-30 outlet (no neutral), then get that adapter instead.
 

MNScott

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I have a 240-volt dryer circuit on a 30 amp breaker that I'm not using (I have a gas dryer) I was thinking putting in a Nema 15-40 on this 30 amp breaker to charge a model 3 long range. Here are my questions:

1) Will this work?

2) About how many miles of charge can I get off of this setup with a 30 amp breaker?

Thanks for the help.
No! The wiring is almost assuredly sized for that 30a breaker and associated plug. I *think* you mean a 14-50 plug (NEMA does not recognize any 15-40...) which is rated for 50 amps. The problem is, if you try to draw 32a-48a (which is what the LR will charge at on a 14-50 unless you override) you could potentially overheat the wiring and cause a fire. Down the road, the next owner would reasonably think that the particular plug is rated for 50a and could have trouble.

Please - consult a professional electrician. What you are proposing is not up to code and is potentially hazardous to you and your family.

Scott
 

JasonF

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You will need a 220v, 30 amp outlet of some sort to charge off of that circuit. The wiring isn't sized for a circuit larger than that.

But before you even get into that, those top two left breakers might need replacement, as they don't appear to be completely seated on the bus bars, and may be melted underneath. And the mains wires coming in look really brittle, I wonder if they've been heating up.

For whoever mentioned about the box being full: It's offiically a sub-panel, since there's no main circuit breaker present. I can't see the main panel, so I don't know how many amps are fed to it, but there may be plenty more capacity in it. If that's the case, a 2nd sub-panel can be installed next to the one you see to support a NEMA 14-50.
 

Frully

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I made an adapter for my parents house...since they have a 6-30 heater extension in their garage. Have to be sure to set the car to 24A though. At 24A I get about 35km/h on LR AWD.

This is not to code I'm sure but I spec'd all the parts to be safe, especially since Tesla doesn't support 6-30 natively with an official adapter.
1554003723179-png.24169
 

garsh

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But before you even get into that, those top two left breakers might need replacement, as they don't appear to be completely seated on the bus bars
They look completely seated to me. But the potato camera does appear to distort the image a good bit. ;)
 

garsh

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Also, is noone going to comment on the 4 gauge millipede up above the top left bus bar?
Holy crap, I didn't even notice that the first time. :oops:
I bet that explains the breaker to the sub-panel tripping for no apparent reason at some point in the past.
 

Grrrreg

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Hello folks!

So I am proud to say I took the plunge and have a M3 inbound in three weeks.

Rather than having to keep my charger mobile I have elected to keep it in the frunk and install a wall connector at home. I'm an electrician so it's no big deal.

My question is the setting and ampacitu for the connector. I see conflicting info on Tesla's website, or maybe it's just incomplete. The sales staff weren't all singing the same tune either.

I purchased a standard range battery with RWD. Tesla pushes hard for the 14-50 connection when connected to the mobile it gives u 48kph at 50A. The chart for the wall connector states I can push this out to 71kph on a 60A breaker. Then, another chart says the onboarding charger is rated for 32A only and another spot on the site references the ideal feed for the standard battery and the wall connector is 40A. Phew....

So, reading through all this my ideal feeder, breaker, and wall connector would be 60A I suppose. However, is this too much, will it harm anything, or will the onboarding charger simply only charge what its rated for even if you have far more available current on the connector?

Thanks for any insight
I have a long range car and it’s mobile charger came with a 14-50 and a 110 adapter. I would hope your mobile charger comes with a 14-40 adapter. I had a 30 circuit available so I bought a 14-30 adapter and charge at 24 amps. I rarely let my range get below 150 km, so at most 8 hours charging at 24 amps. In my opinion, unless you are a travelling salesman, you will never use your mobile charger that you keep in the car, in which case I’m sure you wouldn’t have opted for the standard range. You should consider putting in a 40 amp circuit but pull in 60 amp conductors, and use your mobile charger at home. You can take it with you on trips. You can add a wall connector later if needed, but might be a waste of money now.

The standard range current is 32.

I have never been able to confirm this but I believe the mobile charger only recognizes the NEMA adapter you are using. You will be more than happy charging at 32 amps. Set it to auto charge at midnight. And plug it in 2 or 3 times a week.
 
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If your house is older, and has a NEMA 10-30 outlet (no neutral).
This /\ /\ is a patently false statement.

On such important electrical/charging threads of this nature where safety is paramount, I continue to find it very troubling that folks with (other than google) obviously no residential wiring experience/knowledge, no commercial wiring experience/knowledge, and no NEC knowledge continue to post on threads that could potentially cause personal injury or property damage.
 

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This /\ /\ is a patently false statement.
On such important electrical/charging threads of this nature where safety is paramount, I continue to find it very troubling that folks with (other than google) obviously no residential wiring experience/knowledge, no commercial wiring experience/knowledge, and no NEC knowledge continue to post on threads that could potentially cause personal injury or property damage.
I'm actually more worried about people who believe one of the leads on a 220v outlet is "neutral" and isn't live. They're possibly in for a shock someday. Literally.
 

TrevP

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Anything that's this close to ourselves on a daily basis that can kill you in an instant and have strict regulatory safety codes is really best left to the pros.

Please folks, hire a professional electrician when it comes to wiring a charger or doing major electrical work, especially if you know nothing or little about electricity. It could save your life and your expensive property.
 

JasonF

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Please folks, hire a professional electrician when it comes to wiring a charger or doing major electrical work, especially if you know nothing or little about electricity. It could save your life and your expensive property.
I have a personal story to emphasize that point:

I’m NOT a licensed electrician, I learned how to do electrical work from practice and looking things up. I’ve been doing this for years, so I have quite a bit of experience. Yet every time I have an electrician here doing some work I won’t do (mostly mucking around inside the breaker box) I learn something new about safety and electrical code.

So even if you think you know what you’re doing, and you research heavily, you can still make a mistake. It’s best if you make your mistakes with highly tolerant low-amperage household outlets, and not with a high amperage car charger that has to dissipate a lot of heat. If you’re not absolutely certain, hire a pro.

The last thing I learned (and the last thing I expected|) was just a month ago when I learned that outdoors, even in a sealed box, you cannot chain a non-GFCI to a GFCI. It’s perfectly safe to do that; it just won’t pass an electrical inspection because it’s not code. You also can’t chain a lone outdoor outlet to a GFCI indoors just because the box is too small - you’re expected to tear into the wall and replace the box. Same reason - perfectly safe, but won’t pass inspection.

You can always learn something from a pro who does this kind of thing daily, rather than once a year or so.
 
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I have a Tesla wall connector connected to a 60 amp breaker and the wall connector itself is set to 48 amps. I've been using this without any issues since taking delivery of my M3 in Oct '18. I might not have ever noticed so I thought I'd ask here... I have always used "scheduled charging" so that I could start charging about an hour or two before I would leave to go to work. This is great for the winter. I usually get out of my car when I get home and plug it in and go on inside. I haven't looked at the charge display in quite some time. Needless to say the other day I went to look at my energy meter (love the increased temps and efficiency!), but instead got the charge display.

It was showing 5 amps and the "scheduled charging" was correct?

I changed the 5 to 48 and remembered to check it again in a few days. I checked yesterday and it was again back at 5?

Is this a problem? What's going on? I've never noticed anything not charging. It's always ready to go when I leave...
 

Mike

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I have a Tesla wall connector connected to a 60 amp breaker and the wall connector itself is set to 48 amps. I've been using this without any issues since taking delivery of my M3 in Oct '18. I might not have ever noticed so I thought I'd ask here... I have always used "scheduled charging" so that I could start charging about an hour or two before I would leave to go to work. This is great for the winter. I usually get out of my car when I get home and plug it in and go on inside. I haven't looked at the charge display in quite some time. Needless to say the other day I went to look at my energy meter (love the increased temps and efficiency!), but instead got the charge display.

It was showing 5 amps and the "scheduled charging" was correct?

I changed the 5 to 48 and remembered to check it again in a few days. I checked yesterday and it was again back at 5?

Is this a problem? What's going on? I've never noticed anything not charging. It's always ready to go when I leave...
I've also noticed the 5 amp setting showing prior to a planned 48 amp charge.