Hands-on-wheel warning message

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FrancoisP

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#1
I'm finding that when Autopilot is engaged while driving on a straight stretch of road with both my hands on the wheel that I get pestered every 30 seconds with a warning message asking me to giggle the wheel to show that I'm not sleeping.

I thought that having both my hands on the wheel at position 10:10 was enough to avoid the pesky messages.

Is this common or are my car's wheel sensors not sensitive enough?
 

3V Pilot

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#3
I use one hand on the wheel at the 7 o'clock position. For me this gives the car the perfect amount of feedback and it never bugs me. The problem with both hands is that they counterbalance each other so the car doesn't feel any torque from you, therefor it doesn't know you are there.
 

FrancoisP

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#4
I use one hand on the wheel at the 7 o'clock position. For me this gives the car the perfect amount of feedback and it never bugs me. The problem with both hands is that they counterbalance each other so the car doesn't feel any torque from you, therefor it doesn't know you are there.
So, the torque is only "visible" when Autopilot finds resistance turning the wheel? There is no sensor that can detect downward pressure caused by the weight of my arms on the wheel?
 

garsh

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#5
So, the torque is only "visible" when Autopilot finds resistance turning the wheel? There is no sensor that can detect downward pressure caused by the weight of my arms on the wheel?
Correct. The only force it detects is one that that attempts to turn the wheel left or right.

As @3V Pilot says, I place my left hand at 7 o'clock (and alternate to the right hand at 5 o'clock ), and the weight of my hand & arm is enough to make it happy, and not enough to turn off autopilot.
 

gary in NY

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#7
Correct. The only force it detects is one that that attempts to turn the wheel left or right.

As @3V Pilot says, I place my left hand at 7 o'clock (and alternate to the right hand at 5 o'clock ), and the weight of my hand & arm is enough to make it happy, and not enough to turn off autopilot.

I'm doing the same thing, only primarily right handed at the 4-5 o'clock position (most comfortable for me), trading off to the left from time to time. Never get bugged with this method, and always feel in control.
 

Kizzy

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#8
I rest my left elbow on my door arm rest with my left hand grasping the wheel firmly between 9-10 o’clock. I leave my wrist and arm relaxed so that they shift with the wheel while I maintain my grip, but the weight of my hand and forearm is supported by the wheel and continues to be as the wheel turns slightly.

Experiment until you find (a) position(s) that you find comfortable to maintain for a long period of time and suited for how much steering the car does (straighter roads require more consistent torque (twisting toward one side) as the wheel moves less so fewer opportunities exist for it to find your hand resisting it’s movements).
 

Needsdecaf

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#10
Telsa's torque sensor to measure steering wheel hand holding blows chunks. It really, really sucks. I have big hands and arms and apparently having my elbow on the door and one hand on the wheel, or even sometimes two hands on the wheel, is not enough to trigger it.

Optical sensor would be 100X better and allow true hands free driving.
 

John

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#12
Also, never "jerk" the wheel.
Just use gentle constant turning force to one side or the other.
I put the steering wheel all the way down (might as well, no speedo to peep at, better forward visibility), rest both arms on my legs, and use both hands to gently and constantly turn the wheel to one side. After a few moments, switch to the other direction. After a while, it's all subconscious. You've got both hands on the wheel, and since each shares the work, it's not tiring at all.
 

gary in NY

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#13
Telsa's torque sensor to measure steering wheel hand holding blows chunks. It really, really sucks. I have big hands and arms and apparently having my elbow on the door and one hand on the wheel, or even sometimes two hands on the wheel, is not enough to trigger it.

Optical sensor would be 100X better and allow true hands free driving.
I think it's more about finding the sweet spot. I don't have big hands, or big arms either, but have found the "spot" that keeps the nag away without any thought or effort. It's actually kind of relaxing. I'll be road tripping for the next week and am now curious about this. If I make any discoveries I'll be sure to report back.