Get Your Wheels Aftermarket Wheels

garsh

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#41
Go Big or Go Home - 9.5" wide fronts and 11.0" rears in 18" / 19" / 20" are NO problem, there is actually a little more room under there than a Model S.
So, do you have a staggered set of 18" wheels, with 11"-wide for the back?
 

Mad Hungarian

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#42
Questions for you:

Does that mean that if we want a smoother ride (less sporty) but still with 18 inch wheels (since 17 will not fit), we should go with a narrower rim (in this case 8 instead of 8.5)?

If that is the case, do we keep the same offset (to get same outside appearance)?

Thanks for all the help (and for helping out You You)
Technically the reduction in width will help, especially when the original rim width is near or at the upper limit of the tire's range. But the difference is really small and I don't think it's worth spending money on wheels just for that. You'd get a far more noticeable improvement by changing to a more comfort oriented tire in the same size.
I can now tell you first hand that all the concern I've been reading about this car having only low or really low profile tire choices, and how rough the ride is going to be, is now right out the window. I drove it in artic-like temps on bomb-cratered Quebec roads. At least on 18's, the ride is fabulous, and I can't imagine the 19s being hugely worse. And I'm real picky when it comes to this stuff. This is the joy of a really well sorted multi-link suspension.
 
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garsh

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#43
Our measurements indicared the stock 19x8.5 at +40 was about 15mm inset from the fender edge in front and about 25mm in back. So if you wanted to keep those sizes all around but give it a little more stance, but not poke it, I'd say +30 would work.
If, on the other hand, I want wider wheels, but keeping the same offsets, then the widest wheel that doesn't poke out from the fender would be:
15mm = 0.6 inches, multiply by two, so 9.5" wide front wheels
25mm = 1 inch, so 10.5" wide rear wheels.

Yeah, I think I'm definitely going to want 10"-wide wheels in the back. :cool:
 

Mad Hungarian

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#44
Before you ship YouYou’s stock Tesla 19” sport wheels wheels out to YVR any chance you could pull a tire and give us the actual weight of the factory wheel? Would be very helpful in deciding wheel choice on ordering. I want 19’s but not 30+ pound ones. More interested in a 19” x 8.5 in the max 25 lb range with the correct load capacity.
As an aside the snow package on his car that I drove last night was really good. Drove it on a variety of dry to wet to snow covered roads. Pushed hard but a little frustrating considering the inability to fully defeat TC and stability control.
You mean like so?...
20180105_142042-jpg.4857


As we can see the complete assembly weight is 48 lbs. Deduct 23 lbs for this particular model of Conti tire, and maybe a few ounces for the TPMS sensors and balance weights and we arrive at 24 point-something pounds. Not exactly super-svelte, but quite respectable for an OEM wheel that has to pass some really nasty test standards. And noticebly lighter than the 0.5" narrower OE Model S wheel.
 
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Mad Hungarian

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#45
If, on the other hand, I want wider wheels, but keeping the same offsets, then the widest wheel that doesn't poke out from the fender would be:
15mm = 0.6 inches, multiply by two, so 9.5" wide front wheels
25mm = 1 inch, so 10.5" wide rear wheels.

Yeah, I think I'm definitely going to want 10"-wide wheels in the back. :cool:
Your math is right on.
Just for those who are interested in Going To 11 in back, this is easily done by increasing the rear offset as there's gobs more room to the inside of the fenderwell. Which makes sense as the OE staggered 19×9.5 and 20x10.0 rears have a higher offset of +45 to keep them tucked in.
 

Jakesthree

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#46
Hey Mad Hungarian, I hate to be the bringer of bad news but did you see what happened to the wheels on You You's Model 3 last night? A test driver last night hit a pothole and broke 2 wheels. Damn!
 

Mad Hungarian

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#48
Hey Mad Hungarian, I hate to be the bringer of bad news but did you see what happened to the wheels on You You's Model 3 last night? A test driver last night hit a pothole and broke 2 wheels. Damn!
Yeah... unbelievably bad luck.
Have been back and forth with You You in the last hour and apparently it was a massive hole in the road that had taken out a number of cars, not just his. Looking at the images that had to be one hell an impact. I'm just glad everyone's OK. He'll need to get the suspension and alignment checked though, there may be more damage under the car.
Good news is he managed to get two replacement wheels of some kind with all-season tires so he's mobile again.
 
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Mad Hungarian

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#49
Yeah... unbelievably bad luck.
Have been back and forth with You You in the last hour and apparently it was a massive hole in the road that had taken out a number of cars, not just his. Looking at the images that had to be one hell an impact. I'm just glad everyone's OK. He'll need to get the suspension and alignment checked though, there may be more damage under the car.
Good news is he managed to get two replacement wheels of some kind with all-season tires so he's mobile again.
I'm going to arrange on Monday to have two proper replacements air-freighted to a suitable point on his route.
Seeing some of the stories in the news about this now, looks like some wheels fared even worse...
http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2018/01/pothole_in_the_middle_of_i-94.html
 

Pescakl1

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#51
... and maybe a few ounces for the TPMS sensors and balance weights ...
Sorry, a lot of questions:

About the TPMs, from what I read, they are sensors on the rims, right?

There are different types of TPMS: some are attached on the rims (like Ford cars), some are integrated to the valves (like it was on my Nissan Rogue), and some OEM do not put anything on the wheel and calculate pressure loss by computation (like on my BMW 328).

Could you confirm that they use the first (Ford) method?
If so, are they specific sensors or generic ones we can find on ebay easily (Common frequency, etc...).

Thanks again (and thanks for the clarification on the width of the wheels).

BTW: What do you think of the Tesla kits for winter tires? Any comment on the choice of tires? Are the prices correct in your view?
 
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#52
Actually it will go to 11 back there. And not just in the Spinal Tap sense.
Let me repost our findings from the Road Trip thread (which is where I should have started here):

Re wheels, we did do a full 3D sweep of the calipers and all relevant suspension and body components. Just got the data uploaded and it's showing a LOT of options. At least on the upside of things...
Go Big or Go Home - 9.5" wide fronts and 11.0" rears in 18" / 19" / 20" are NO problem, there is actually a little more room under there than a Model S.
Downsize-for-winter - Welllll, it's almost exactly what I thought from the photos we've seen... you CAN fit a 17", but it's razor-thin close over the rear brakes. And when I say "a" wheel, I mean "a" wheel. Out of the 85 models we have in the right 17" specs. there is exactly one that fits over the rear brakes, and that with just 2.1mm of clearance to the barrel. On paper that is the absolute bare minimum we would ever consider for acceptable caliper-to-inner-barrel clearance, but until we can do some real-world testing we're not going to allow it as it's pretty clear the car wasn't designed for 17".
Hey Mad Hungarian,
I hope your real world testing yield acceptable results for the 17” wheel. I am too living in winter pothole wonderland and any extra sidewall, I will take it. 215-55-R17 would be great as they would be the exact same overall diameter than the 18” OEM tires.
If not, I wonder if a set of 225-50-R18 could be better than sticking with 235-45-R18 for defending against potholes in the winter. That would still provide a bit more sidewall, but increase tire diameter by +2.3%. I heard that usually a 3% diameter change is ok – hopefully it is the case with the 3…
 

Mad Hungarian

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#53
Hey Mad Hungarian,
I hope your real world testing yield acceptable results for the 17” wheel. I am too living in winter pothole wonderland and any extra sidewall, I will take it. 215-55-R17 would be great as they would be the exact same overall diameter than the 18” OEM tires.
If not, I wonder if a set of 225-50-R18 could be better than sticking with 235-45-R18 for defending against potholes in the winter. That would still provide a bit more sidewall, but increase tire diameter by +2.3%. I heard that usually a 3% diameter change is ok – hopefully it is the case with the 3…
The 225/50R18 might be a good alternative but we'd need to road test it for fender liner clearance in front, it would likely be real tight when turning. Especially with winter tires as they generally have much more pronounced tread blocks in the shoulder area.
Model S is bad for that, any decrease in front wheel offset or increase in tire width or height can cause rubbing against the plastic liner when turning. Early ones sometimes did it with OE wheels/tires!
 

JWardell

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#54
Downsize-for-winter - Welllll, it's almost exactly what I thought from the photos we've seen... you CAN fit a 17", but it's razor-thin close over the rear brakes. And when I say "a" wheel, I mean "a" wheel. Out of the 85 models we have in the right 17" specs. there is exactly one that fits over the rear brakes, and that with just 2.1mm of clearance to the barrel. On paper that is the absolute bare minimum we would ever consider for acceptable caliper-to-inner-barrel clearance, but until we can do some real-world testing we're not going to allow it as it's pretty clear the car wasn't designed for 17".
YIKES so it's clear 18s are the smallest size to be safe with. Any unique reason besides weight that the brakes are so giant, especially in the rear?

As we can see the complete assembly weight is 48 lbs. Deduct 23 lbs for this particular model of Conti tire, and maybe a few ounces for the TPMS sensors and balance weights and we arrive at 24 point-something pounds. Not exactly super-svelte, but quite respectable for an OEM wheel that has to pass some really nasty test standards. And noticebly lighter than the 0.5" narrower OE Model S wheel.
This illustrates exactly why I like wheels as small as possible...I don't want to lug 50lb wheels up and down to my basement! Not to mention cost and durability. I miss my 15s!

@Mad Hungarian I want to reiterate my thanks for doing all this, as well as going above and beyond to support You You's tire needs. Painful to see those beautiful new rims destroyed last night!
 

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#55
@Mad Hungarian I want to reiterate my thanks for doing all this, as well as going above and beyond to support You You's tire needs. Painful to see those beautiful new rims destroyed last night!
@Mad Hungarian I agree with @JWardell and it’s a shame to see people on the internet immediately say your rims aren’t of good quality without knowing anything of the depth of what they hit and speed they were traveling.
 

garsh

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#56

Mad Hungarian

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#57
I believe the rear brakes incorporate a small drum brake for the parking brake, so that it's separate from the normal brakes. The rear rotor has a larger overall diameter due to the central portion of the rotor incorporating a small drum brake.

Nissan has the same setup for the Leaf.
http://www.electricvehiclewiki.com/Brakes,_ABS#How_The_Parking.2F_Emergency_Brake_Works
Yes to all the above, plus using a larger diameter rotor means they can get away with using a much cheaper single piston floating caliper to achieve the required braking force.
In front - where more than 70% of the braking happens due to the car pitching forward - the opposite applies, they went with a 4-piston monoblock caliper to get enough clamping force while keeping the rotor small enough to fit under an 18" wheel.
 

Mad Hungarian

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#58
YIKES so it's clear 18s are the smallest size to be safe with. Any unique reason besides weight that the brakes are so giant, especially in the rear?



This illustrates exactly why I like wheels as small as possible...I don't want to lug 50lb wheels up and down to my basement! Not to mention cost and durability. I miss my 15s!

@Mad Hungarian I want to reiterate my thanks for doing all this, as well as going above and beyond to support You You's tire needs. Painful to see those beautiful new rims destroyed last night!
Hey, glad to do it. I've been bailed out so many times online by knowledgeble people on so many subjects that I lost count a long long time ago. Believing in karma I feel this is a way for me to give back from my little corner of the world.
As for You You, it was much the same. Here was a guy that is going WAY WAY above and beyond to spread the Model 3 love to so many of us who have been dying to see it. It was unthinkable that we wouldn't try to help him make a safer trip through the northern leg. We in turn got a huge amount of data on the car at the same time so we can develop new product for it. And also share with the whole M3OC community. A win-win-win.

What happened last night of course is really unfortunate, but we know whenever we put our products out in the spotlight there's always a chance something bad can happen. That's the chance you take, but we believe that's the only way to prove our stuff's any good. And in fact we do far worse things ourselves to the wheels for the same reason.
Will some people blame it on the fact it's an aftermarket wheel? Of course. But I must say once people started seeing the news articles about the problems on I-94 and the pictures of completely shredded OEM wheels the reaction has been overwhelmingly understanding.
 
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Sandy

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#59
You mean like so?...
View attachment 4857

As we can see the complete assembly weight is 48 lbs. Deduct 23 lbs for this particular model of Conti tire, and maybe a few ounces for the TPMS sensors and balance weights and we arrive at 24 point-something pounds. Not exactly super-svelte, but quite respectable for an OEM wheel that has to pass some really nasty test standards. And noticebly lighter than the 0.5" narrower OE Model S wheel.
Thanks! I really appreciate that! 24-25 lbs for a 10 spoke 19” x 8.5” flow formed cast non- forged wheel is a great weight imo. Makes my decision easy! I’m guessing those spokes are hollowed out pretty well on the back. Most of the aftermarket Tesla ‘turbines’ in that size are 29 lbs+.
Another interesting fact with the tires are that the stock Continental ProContact RX 235/40R19 XL 96W 400AA are rated for 168 mph and weight 23 lbs vs the ContiProContact 235/40R19 XL 96V 400AA are rated for a lesser 149mph and weight 26 lbs. 3 lbs more for a tire with a lesser speed rating and identical load rating.
I’m guessing the 23 lb ProContact RX was speced by Tesla. Thanks for taking the time to check.
PS. Totally with you that there is not a street wheel built that would have survived the pothole that You You’s car hit. Shown by multiple damage to all the other vehicles involved. Zero to do with your supplied wheels.
 
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Jongaud

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#60
Every tire size had what's called a "permissible rim width range", and that can be anything from 0.5" to 3.0" or more. It's then up to the engineer, tuner or owner to decide which width within that range will give them the desired result. Narrower means less weight and often a smoother ride, while going wider reduces the sidewall flex a bit and gives the tire wider, more stable footing to operate from, firming it up a bit and increasing steering response. Tesla obviously wanted the sportier side of that equation. I theorize that the wider width may also help with reducing energy loses from hysteresis (the tire flex as it rolls), meaning a little better range. But I don't know that one for a fact.
All this being said, it is now clear that I (we) want you to build a Model 3 specific
version (18 x 8.5) of your gorgeous Replika R187 ! :) You may also provide a choice of colours ;)

r187-gunmetal-jpg.4872


P.S. As suggested by many of you, I'll keep my aero wheels for winter and buy the new set Ian will provide us with for summer.