Freightliner eCascadia - impressions from a professional driver

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Dr. J

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#3
Any idea how this compares to the Tesla Semi?

"The eCascadia emits no tailpipe emissions because it doesn't have a tailpipe. Its batteries provide 550 kilowatt hours (kWh) of usable capacity. The truck travels up to 250 miles on a single charge range which can be 80% replenished in about 90 minutes. Williams said his state of charge might drop 1% in two hours of quiet and comfortable waiting. "

Sounds like it usually takes two cabs to keep one driver busy due to recharging time. This is an ideal application of a semi EV; long haul would be a different story, requiring a Supercharger-like network. Cool truck, though.
 

garsh

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#4
Any idea how this compares to the Tesla Semi?
Tesla Semi:
  • 300 or 500 miles of range
  • efficiency: < 2kWh/mile
Tesla isn't advertising the actual capacity, but given the above advertised values, we can assume 600kWh and 1000kWh as maximum values for the two versions of the truck. I would expect actual capacity to be less, given how good Tesla is at making their vehicles efficient.

As far as charging, we have what little we've learned about the upcoming Tesla Megacharger:
https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-semi-megacharger-charging-port-close-up-look/
  • Elon: 400 miles in 30 minutes.
That would be 80% replenished in 30 minutes.
 

MelindaV

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#5
  • Elon: 400 miles in 30 minutes.
That would be 80% replenished in 30 minutes.
any idea how this compares to the time a trucker would typically pull into a fuel truck stop (although most truck stop visits are likely more driven by time needed to rest)? while long haul trucks would not typically need to stop as frequently, I would expect most of their stops at a truck stop would at least that time if not more between fueling, checking tires or other service things, bathroom break, etc.
 
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#10
Tesla Semi:
  • 300 or 500 miles of range
  • efficiency: < 2kWh/mile
Tesla isn't advertising the actual capacity, but given the above advertised values, we can assume 600kWh and 1000kWh as maximum values for the two versions of the truck. I would expect actual capacity to be less, given how good Tesla is at making their vehicles efficient.
Transport trucks are all about aerodynamics and the trailer and load figure prominently into that. Don't believe me ? Put a small trailer behind your S/3/X/Y and report back with your Wh/mile figure.

600 KWh/mile x 60 MPH = 46 KW motor power at steady state. Yeah, no, that ain't happening.

1000 KWh/mile x 60 MPH = 60 KW motor power at steady state. That isn't happening either.

Conventional highway tractors need at least 150 HP to pull a trailer at 60 MPH. Tesla might be able to get that down some, but that is a low number. I'm thinking an average highway truck needs 200 HP to pull the load, steady state, 150 KW. 150 KW/ 60 MPH = 2.5 KWHr/mile.

400 miles x 2.5 KWHr/mile = 1 MW of batteries on board. 1 MW / 200 watthours/Kg = 5,000 Kg of batteries, which is doable if the rest of the truck is kept really light. A typical diesel road tractor weighs about 20,000 pounds.

That is my guess and I'm sticking to it.
 

garsh

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#11
600 KWh/mile x 60 MPH = 46 KW motor power at steady state. Yeah, no, that ain't happening.
You took a battery capacity number (600 KWh), and arbitrarily divided it by a single mile. That doesn't have any real-world meaning.

Tesla already gave an efficiency estimate, and I quoted it above: "under 2kWh/mile". Assume the provided efficiency was for a 60 mph highway speed.
Then we can calculate the steady-state power being used to achieve that efficiency: (2kW•h/mile x 60 miles/hour x 1 hour) = 120 kW.
120 kW is equal to 160 HP.

At least we seem to be in agreement as far as battery size (I assume you meant to write 1 MWh).
1 MW of batteries on board.
we can assume 600kWh and 1000kWh as maximum values for the two versions of the truck.