First Model 3 motor failure!

3V Pilot

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#4
Yup. Sounds like they were right on it. Hopefully just an isolated incident as we haven't heard of any other problems.
As close as the press is following this car, and with all the major manufactures out there pushing for as much bad press as possible, I'm sure we'd of heard about any others. Seems like an isolated incident and I hope more info is released once they find the cause.
 

KarenRei

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#5
Given how the vast majority of Model 3s were produced in the past couple months, most in the past month or two, it seems pretty clear that this was a manufacturing defect rather than a wear issue.
 

LUXMAN

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#6
Given how the vast majority of Model 3s were produced in the past couple months, most in the past month or two, it seems pretty clear that this was a manufacturing defect rather than a wear issue.
Oh yeah. especially with only 250 miles on the car
 

TesLou

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#7
Given how the vast majority of Model 3s were produced in the past couple months, most in the past month or two, it seems pretty clear that this was a manufacturing defect rather than a wear issue.
This, among many other little qualms and quirks, is why I think I have the ultimate delivery timeframe (May-July). Like a squirrel, I'm busy socking away cash (cache?) to lower my payment while some of these early bugs and build issues are sorted out. I particularly want all of the EAP bugs to be gone by the time I take delivery, as well as some additional voice commands to be updated via software.

By the way, this is my 100th post. Any swag or door prizes for that milestone? :)
 

teslaliving

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#8
Man that sucks. I'm on my third drive unit on my S and wouldn't want to go through all that over again with new drive units on the 3. At these volumes this could kill them if they don't get ahead of it.
 

KarenRei

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#9
Man that sucks. I'm on my third drive unit on my S and wouldn't want to go through all that over again with new drive units on the 3. At these volumes this could kill them if they don't get ahead of it.
I see no reason to equate this to the S drive unit problem. This is very clearly a manufacturing defect, not a wear issue.

One drive unit manufacturing defect out of thousands of vehicles.
 

teslaliving

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#10
I see no reason to equate this to the S drive unit problem. This is very clearly a manufacturing defect, not a wear issue.

One drive unit manufacturing defect out of thousands of vehicles.
Based on what data? Also the S ones took time to fail and the rate wasnt super high either. I think only time will tell if they've repeated the issue or this is indeed an isolated incident.
 

Dr. J

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#11
Like a squirrel, I'm busy socking away cash (cache?) to lower my payment while some of these early bugs and build issues are sorted out.
Caching cash.
Your later time frame is almost equivalent to second-year production, which I have heard is a useful time to buy to avoid early defects. Seems wise to me.
 
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#12
Friend had to go to war with BMW over his 2017 3 Series BMW that had engine failure three times in 12 mths. We don't have lemon laws in Australia so had to go back over and over and only had the car three months in last 10. He eventually had to lawyer up to get them to take the car back and give him a refund. Case is still ongoing. The car first failed two days after he took possession. Another associate had similar issue with his new Land Rover.
 

KarenRei

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#13
Based on what data? Also the S ones took time to fail
That's precisely the point. The S motors took time to fail. This did not. The S motors were a design defect. This was a manufacturing defect. They're two entirely different things.

and the rate wasnt super high either
Not true; the rate of motor failures in the S was nearly 100%. Almost every early S eventually suffered a motor failure (if the motor wasn't preemptively swapped out first). They were a design defect, not a manufacturing defect.

That does not mean that there are not design defects in the Model 3. There very well could be. What we can say, however, is that this case is not one of them.
 

jsmay311

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#14
My Model 3 suffered a catastrophic mechanical failure earlier today that sounds similar to the "motor" failure described above. It happened only 25 hours and 63 miles after delivery, right upon the very first time I floored the accelerator. See below for a more complete description.

But first, since the service center won't look at it till Monday and I'm dying to understand what happened, here's 2 questions for the M30C community:

  1. Does anyone know if it was ever publicly reported what specifically failed in the incident described above back in February?

  2. Are there any good visuals or diagrams that show the innards of the Model 3 rear drive unit that someone could share to help me hypothesize about what might have broken in there?
------------------------------

Full story: I picked up my brand new LR RWD Model 3 yesterday. (VIN 37XXX) On the drive home I never felt the need to really punch the accelerator since I had previously rented a Model 3 on Turo and so I already knew what it was capable of.

Fast forward to this afternoon and I took a work friend out for a spin (he’s a reservation holder who’s undecided about placing an order). The car was going about 20mph when I punched the accelerator to show off what it was capable of. Immediately we hear a loud bang/pop from the back of the car, followed by an abrupt loss of power to the wheels (i.e., not responsive to accelerator inputs), followed by several seconds of violent shuddering and a loud squealing noise coming from the back of the car, and all the while the speedometer is wildly going all over the place (e.g., I think it zoomed up to over 50mph when we were only going 20mph, and then the mph numbers were erratically flickering and jumping around).

So I pull off to the side of the road. It still won’t respond to accelerator inputs (apart from a bit more shuddering from the rear and the speedometer jumping up to ~10mph despite the car not moving), so we push it into a nearby parking lot. There are 3 errors on the screen, including something about the emergency brake not available, and regen not working (I think), and one other thing I can't recall. I call Roadside Assistance who has me do a shut down and restart, which predictably does no good.

They call a tow truck which takes me and the car to the Westmont, IL service center. There they say they’ve never heard of any incidents with a Model 3 that sound anything like what I described, and they said they wouldn’t get a chance to look at it until Monday. But they were able to glance and see that the axle shafts appeared intact, so I’m guessing it’s gotta be something in the drive unit.

Sadly I wasn't as lucky as the guy from the original story who got a S P85 loaner. They didn't have any Tesla loaners available so they drove me down the street to wait in line at Enterprise for a rental. :(
 

Scuffers

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#15
from your description, that sounds like something in the motor/drive unit has broken loose, the fact the speedo is jumping about implies one of the shaft sensors got hit or whatever it was looking at broke apart.

is it possible one the magnets could escape?
 

PNWmisty

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#16
My Model 3 suffered a catastrophic mechanical failure earlier today that sounds similar to the "motor" failure described above. It happened only 25 hours and 63 miles after delivery, right upon the very first time I floored the accelerator. See below for a more complete description.

But first, since the service center won't look at it till Monday and I'm dying to understand what happened, here's 2 questions for the M30C community:

  1. Does anyone know if it was ever publicly reported what specifically failed in the incident described above back in February?

  2. Are there any good visuals or diagrams that show the innards of the Model 3 rear drive unit that someone could share to help me hypothesize about what might have broken in there?
------------------------------

Full story: I picked up my brand new LR RWD Model 3 yesterday. (VIN 37XXX) On the drive home I never felt the need to really punch the accelerator since I had previously rented a Model 3 on Turo and so I already knew what it was capable of.

Fast forward to this afternoon and I took a work friend out for a spin (he’s a reservation holder who’s undecided about placing an order). The car was going about 20mph when I punched the accelerator to show off what it was capable of. Immediately we hear a loud bang/pop from the back of the car, followed by an abrupt loss of power to the wheels (i.e., not responsive to accelerator inputs), followed by several seconds of violent shuddering and a loud squealing noise coming from the back of the car, and all the while the speedometer is wildly going all over the place (e.g., I think it zoomed up to over 50mph when we were only going 20mph, and then the mph numbers were erratically flickering and jumping around).

So I pull off to the side of the road. It still won’t respond to accelerator inputs (apart from a bit more shuddering from the rear and the speedometer jumping up to ~10mph despite the car not moving), so we push it into a nearby parking lot. There are 3 errors on the screen, including something about the emergency brake not available, and regen not working (I think), and one other thing I can't recall. I call Roadside Assistance who has me do a shut down and restart, which predictably does no good.

They call a tow truck which takes me and the car to the Westmont, IL service center. There they say they’ve never heard of any incidents with a Model 3 that sound anything like what I described, and they said they wouldn’t get a chance to look at it until Monday. But they were able to glance and see that the axle shafts appeared intact, so I’m guessing it’s gotta be something in the drive unit.

Sadly I wasn't as lucky as the guy from the original story who got a S P85 loaner. They didn't have any Tesla loaners available so they drove me down the street to wait in line at Enterprise for a rental. :(
It sounds like the reduction gear failed/came apart. I'm guessing it's due to assembly error (like forgetting to install/tighten a part).
 

CoastalCruiser

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#17
  1. Are there any good visuals or diagrams that show the innards of the Model 3 rear drive unit that someone could share to help me hypothesize about what might have broken in there?
I don't know that I've seen any shots of the gearbox area of the drive unit. There were no photos I know of from the German teardown, and the Jack Rickard and Ingineerix teardowns have not broken the drive unit open yet (in terms of what they've published), so there is only bits and pieces photos from the Munro teardown (see below). I might be able to get a shot of the gears intact in the case from Sandy Munro. Based upon what may be similar incidences of this type of failure reported in the Tesla forum -where a loud clunk or thunking noise is heard before the car won't go any more- the gearbox is certainly a suspect. I like PNWmisty's theory.


upload_2018-8-6_8-40-26-png.12703
 

jsmay311

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#18
Quick update: I got a call from the local service center a few days ago and they informed me that my car's drive unit would be replaced. Apart from that, the only concrete piece of information about the failure that they had to share was that the pyro fuse had blown. (This fact apparently had been relayed to the SC by Tesla Engineering who had reviewed the vehicle logs.)

Please help me understand this. I thought that if the pyro fuse blows, it isolates the high-voltage battery. But after I heard the initial “bang” from the rear of my car and I lost power to the wheels, the motor appeared to continue to respond to accelerator pedal inputs by revving up (as evidenced by the rear end of the car shaking/shuddering and emitting loud noises after pressing the accelerator pedal on 2 separate occasions, and also by the speed on the speedometer rising up independent of the wheel speed at the same time as the shaking and noise). Additionally, the AC continued to blow cold air for at least another 30 minutes despite 95F outside temps.

If the pyro fuse had actually blown, wouldn’t neither of these things be possible? (I.e., the motor wouldn’t rev up and the A/C compressor wouldn’t run because neither would have any power available to them?)

Can anyone with a better understanding about the effects of a blown pyro fuse than me point out errors in my logic? (Thanks!)
 

KarenRei

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#19
Quick update: I got a call from the local service center a few days ago and they informed me that my car's drive unit would be replaced. Apart from that, the only concrete piece of information about the failure that they had to share was that the pyro fuse had blown. (This fact apparently had been relayed to the SC by Tesla Engineering who had reviewed the vehicle logs.)

Please help me understand this. I thought that if the pyro fuse blows, it isolates the high-voltage battery. But after I heard the initial “bang” from the rear of my car and I lost power to the wheels, the motor appeared to continue to respond to accelerator pedal inputs by revving up (as evidenced by the rear end of the car shaking/shuddering and emitting loud noises after pressing the accelerator pedal on 2 separate occasions, and also by the speed on the speedometer rising up independent of the wheel speed at the same time as the shaking and noise). Additionally, the AC continued to blow cold air for at least another 30 minutes despite 95F outside temps.

If the pyro fuse had actually blown, wouldn’t neither of these things be possible? (I.e., the motor wouldn’t rev up and the A/C compressor wouldn’t run because neither would have any power available to them?)

Can anyone with a better understanding about the effects of a blown pyro fuse than me point out errors in my logic? (Thanks!)
My understanding is the same as yours (*shrug*)
 

3V Pilot

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#20
Quick update: I got a call from the local service center a few days ago and they informed me that my car's drive unit would be replaced. Apart from that, the only concrete piece of information about the failure that they had to share was that the pyro fuse had blown. (This fact apparently had been relayed to the SC by Tesla Engineering who had reviewed the vehicle logs.)

Please help me understand this. I thought that if the pyro fuse blows, it isolates the high-voltage battery. But after I heard the initial “bang” from the rear of my car and I lost power to the wheels, the motor appeared to continue to respond to accelerator pedal inputs by revving up (as evidenced by the rear end of the car shaking/shuddering and emitting loud noises after pressing the accelerator pedal on 2 separate occasions, and also by the speed on the speedometer rising up independent of the wheel speed at the same time as the shaking and noise). Additionally, the AC continued to blow cold air for at least another 30 minutes despite 95F outside temps.

If the pyro fuse had actually blown, wouldn’t neither of these things be possible? (I.e., the motor wouldn’t rev up and the A/C compressor wouldn’t run because neither would have any power available to them?)

Can anyone with a better understanding about the effects of a blown pyro fuse than me point out errors in my logic? (Thanks!)
Is it possbile that you had some sort of internal part failure in the reduction gear or motor, causing the above symptoms, and then the pyro fuse let go sometime later. If you attempted to re-start the car after pulling over or something shorted out after you stopped maybe that is when the fuse blew? Just a guess.....