Donut spare tire kit?

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John

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I've never used the goo/slime thingy before. So does the process goes like this?: TPMS shows a low tire pressure on one of the tires; stop in a safe place (check for nail, etc...), use a mobile air pump (12V lighter socket) to pump up the tire with air, then apply the goo. Just curious if anyone have experience with this.
The goo is pumped in as you inflate. As you drive, it spreads around the tread, starts to be squirted out of the hole, then hardens in the hole. And on the sensor.
 

Quicksilver

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If it's just a slow leak use the compressor to add some air and leave the nail in the tire. Drive to a tire shop and have it repaired. If you are in the middle of nowhere and/or it's leaking air too fast/can't wait for roadside assistance etc....that is when I would use the slime. Kind of a last ditch effort to safe yourself if you really need to.

If you do use the slime follow the instructions and drive for a while after putting it in. Don't just let the tire sit because it will just pool up at the bottom.
Makes sense...there are times on road trips where we are in the middle of nowhere. I'll have to invest in a kit for the 3. Thanks!
 

LUXMAN

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If it's just a slow leak use the compressor to add some air and leave the nail in the tire. Drive to a tire shop and have it repaired. If you are in the middle of nowhere and/or it's leaking air too fast/can't wait for roadside assistance etc....that is when I would use the slime. Kind of a last ditch effort to safe yourself if you really need to.

If you do use the slime follow the instructions and drive for a while after putting it in. Don't just let the tire sit because it will just pool up at the bottom.
Some of the kits say it is safe for TPS. wonder how it is safe. Do they mean it can be cleaned off and the sensor is fine? I would assume it gets down in the orifice and on the diaphragm etc.

One other thing I invested in was this tire patch kit. It was $5 at Harbor Freight. But they have the same thing at Wal-Mart. I have never used one, but I watched a YouTube video on how to use it and it is simple. So if you are on a long lonely highway east of Omaha, you can fix it if you can't limp over to a tire store.
62611-jpg.7299
 

3V Pilot

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Some of the kits say it is safe for TPS. wonder how it is safe. Do they mean it can be cleaned off and the sensor is fine? I would assume it gets down in the orifice and on the diaphragm etc.

One other thing I invested in was this tire patch kit. It was $5 at Harbor Freight. But they have the same thing at Wal-Mart. I have never used one, but I watched a YouTube video on how to use it and it is simple. So if you are on a long lonely highway east of Omaha, you can fix it if you can't limp over to a tire store.
View attachment 7299
I agree and have bought one of these as well. I have used them in the past and it can take a bit of muscle to ream/plug a tire but it doesn't take too long and usually will hold pretty well. Just know that if you do use this method it's considered a temporary fix and you should still get the tire properly patched at a tire shop afterwards. That being said I've had these "temp" plugs last for several thousand miles, but, quite literally, YMMV!
 
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The 135/80-18 emergency donut from a ‘15-16 Genesis drove without upsetting Kay. I will ream the bolt holes a tad since the wheel studs have zero clearance in the bolt holes and make for a tight fit. Rear fitment is fine with this 1,984 lb. load rated 31.6 lb donut vs. the 47.4 lb OEM wheel/tire. This donut, like every one I have ever seen is rated at 50mph maximum. I may have exceeded the max speed rating while testing. In the future, Kay will be wearing different size tires thus requiring me to use a different size donut.

My general emergency kit includes:
spare donut and cover
scissors jack
utility carrying bag
star wrench
nitrile gloves
5-mode flashlight with (2) spare 2170 cells
12v air pump
hi-vis vest
gen 1 UMC accessory bag
plug kit
model 3 jack pad


not pictured:
(2) 2x8x10” wood blocks
other various “items” in case the SHTF

One should always follow the manufacturers guidelines as any aftermarket/non-OEM parts usage could cause damage property and lead to personal injury with catastrophic results.
 
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DNR

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View attachment 7572
The 135/80-18 emergency donut from a ‘15-16 Genesis drove without upsetting Kay. I will ream the bolt holes a tad since the wheel studs have zero clearance in the bolt holes and make for a tight fit. Rear fitment is fine with this 1,984 lb. load rated 31.6 lb donut vs. the 47.4 lb OEM wheel/tire. This donut, like every one I have ever seen is rated at 50mph maximum. I may have exceeded the max speed rating while testing. In the future, Kay will be wearing different size tires thus requiring me to use a different size donut.

My general emergency kit includes:
spare donut and cover
scissors jack
utility carrying bag
star wrench
nitrile gloves
5-mode flashlight with (2) spare 2170 cells
12v air pump
hi-vis vest
gen 1 UMC accessory bag
plug kit
model 3 jack pad


not pictured:
(2) 2x8x10” wood blocks
other various “items” in case the SHTF

One should always follow the manufacturers guidelines as any aftermarket/non-OEM parts usage could cause damage property and lead to personal injury with catastrophic results.
You won't need to change the size of your spare unless you're changing the diameter of your tires. First lifted Model 3? :)
Maxxis makes donuts rated to 81mph.
 

JWardell

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I agree and have bought one of these as well. I have used them in the past and it can take a bit of muscle to ream/plug a tire but it doesn't take too long and usually will hold pretty well. Just know that if you do use this method it's considered a temporary fix and you should still get the tire properly patched at a tire shop afterwards. That being said I've had these "temp" plugs last for several thousand miles, but, quite literally, YMMV!
I keep tire plug kits in my cars and use them almost every year. Almost* always I don't find the nails or screws until I inspect the tires when removing them in my driveway at the end of each season. I've never had a problem with the plugs, some literally continued to be driven on for four years! I simply suggest using the light brownish self vulcanizing plugs vs the black rubber ones that are more common.

*After 25 years, I finally had my first flat on the road a few weeks ago. Thankfully the weather cooperated, but jacking up the car on the side of the highway, pumping it up from 0psi, finding the hole, plugging, refilling, and re-mounting was not for the faint of heart. A long time spent next to 80mph traffic and certainly not something I would expect most people capable of. I have what I need in the cars to do it, but I would MUCH rather have a spare to toss on in half the time. Especially if there is damage or blowout that a plug kit won't help with.
img_1111-jpg.7579
 
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You won't need to change the size of your spare unless you're changing the diameter of your tires. Maxxis makes donuts rated to 81mph.
Yes, I will be changing the diameter of the tires. Thanks for the Maxxis info. I will look to see if they offer the size that I will need.
 

DNR

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Yes, I will be changing the diameter of the tires. Thanks for the Maxxis info. I will look to see if they offer the size that I will need.
I don't think larger diameter tires will fit without a lift and/or fender modifications. Are you sure you don't mean that you are changing the diameter of the wheels? In that case you would install tires that would keep the same outer diameter. The 18", 19", and 20" wheels are all the same diameter with tires installed.
Doing something like this would be awesome though:
20161117_161913-jpg.7618
 

Triangles

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There is now an official aftermarket solution, that in this cheap bastards humble opinion is way over priced. I have found what I think will be a far cheaper alternative from a junk yard, the spare tire from a Genesis. I bought one for $75. BE CAREFUL most are 17" that may not fit the rear wheel. The one I bought is an 18" x 4" 5x114.3 alloy wheel. The spare tire for the Genesis is a 135x80R18 tire that has the same diameter as the OE 235/45R18 tires. Correction: it could be 155/80R18 which is about 5% fewer revs per mile than the OE 235/45R18 or 135/80R18 which is 0.7% or practically the same revolutions per mile as the OE tire. If you have an AWD I'd probably replace the tire with a 135/80R18 size if your spare doesn't already come with that size so as to not put unnecessary wear and tear on the differential. I will keep the tire and just shuffle a front tire to the rear if needed so the spare is always in a front tire position. I plan to buy the lug wrench and jack below from amazon for $25 So for a little over $100 I have put together basically the same thing for about 1/3 the cost. I already have a 12V air compressor but even if I didn't I could buy a fancy one and still be under $150.
Amazon productAmazon productWhen I get my model 3 in a couple weeks I'll test fit the Genesis spare and report back whether or not it fits. One concern is that the Genesis has 12mm studs and the TM3 has 14mm studs. However it should still fit. Hopefully someone has access to test fit one of the 17" Genesis spare wheels and can let us know if that is also a viable option.

Edit 10/31/2018:
I was wrong about the spare tire size. I corrected it above. Also I plan to buy two jacks so I can jack up a complete side of the vehicle to swap wheels front to back if needed.
 
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DNR

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There is now an official aftermarket solution, that in this cheap bastards humble opinion is way over priced. I have found what I think will be a far cheaper alternative from a junk yard, the spare tire from a Genesis. I bought one for $75. BE CAREFUL most are 17" that may not fit the rear wheel. The one I bought is an 18" x 4" 5x114.3 alloy wheel. The spare tire for the Genesis is a 135x80R18 tire that has the same diameter as the OE 235/45R18 tires. I plan to buy the lug wrench and jack below from amazon for $25 So for a little over $100 I have put together basically the same thing for about 1/3 the cost. I already have a 12V air compressor but even if I didn't I could buy a fancy one and still be under $150.
Amazon productAmazon productWhen I get my model 3 in a couple weeks I'll test fit the Genesis spare and report back whether or not it fits. One concern is that the Genesis has 12mm studs and the TM3 has 14mm studs. However it should still fit. Hopefully someone has access to test fit one of the 17" Genesis spare wheels and can let us know if that is also a viable option.
I'm sure you could drill out the holes if it doesn't fit. The wheel is centered by the conical lug nuts not the studs so maybe the holes will be large enough. What's the offset on the Genesis wheels? Have you thought about attaching it to the underside of the rear shelf (in the trunk)?
 
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Triangles

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Yeah I figured mentioning reaming the holes a little would set the trolls into a frenzy so i didn't mention that. That is exactly what I had intended to do :) I was going to put the tools and jack in a tool bag and just throw the spare in the trunk. I hadn't thought much about where/how to mount it. I may explore yanking the useless frunk liner and see if it will fit up there without the frunk liner. I like your idea though about mounting it on the rear shelf. I'll look at that too.
 

garsh

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I may explore yanking the useless frunk liner and see if it will fit up there without the frunk liner.
There's a bunch of stuff hidden around that frunk, protected by the liner. It'll be interesting to see if you can get that to work.

I like your idea though about mounting it on the rear shelf. I'll look at that too.
I like that idea too. It would leave you the entire trunk floor for storage. But I don't know if there's enough room to mount it with the rear seat-back angle. Hopefully, someone with a car can "test-fit" a random compact spare just to get an idea if it's even possible.
 

NoVa3

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That is a great find! I have a full spare, but this would be great for around town or when space is tight on a trip. Let us know what you think when it arrives. Thanks for sharing.

Also, the site is modernspare.com
 

Triangles

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So an 18" spare from a Genesis works as a spare for the TM3. The holes have little to no slack as a genesis has 12mm studs and the TM3 has 14mm studs. However I see no reason to enlarge the holes. There's about 3/16" to 1/4" clearance between the wheel and caliper so I doubt a 17" spare would fit. These pictures should answer any further questions:

For those worried about weight capacity:

So for less than $115 I put together my spare kit.

For now just gets tossed in the trunk. May figure out how / where to mount it later. Also I may fab up a nub/plate to weld to the jack so it mates firmly to the jacking points. For anyone who gets a model 3 I'd highly recommend torquing down the lug nuts after a couple hundred miles. Mine couldn't have been tighter than 60 ft-lbs according to my highly calibrated arm. IIRC the manual says the lug nuts are to be torqued to 129 ft-lbs. That seems a little tight. I would have expected the spec to be 80 ft-lbs or so. But I do not want a wheel coming off so 129 ft-lbs it is. I also read somewhere that you can get a higher speed rated tire in this donut size, I forget where I saw that, probably somewhere earlier in this thread.
 

garsh

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So an 18" spare from a Genesis works as a spare for the TM3.
Oh excellent! Do you know the exact model and year (or year range) for the Genesis that has that spare?

And I see you tried it on the back. That's good, since the rear wheel rotor is actually larger than the front. But the front does have a larger caliper. Did you test fit it there too?

The Performance model has a front rotor & calipers that are even larger, so it's not yet clear what will fit that either. I guess we'll have to wait and see.