Do you hesitate to recommend Tesla to the less technically inclined?

FogNoggin

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#1
I've always been a DIY'er and have a high technical aptitude in general. For a person like me, there was, by choice, a very steep learning curve before purchase. Now that I've had my Model 3 for almost two months, the learning continues on an almost daily basis. There's just so much to know that's not readily apparent, and the car does so many wacky things on a regular basis that require research. The knowledge required to own a Tesla is, I feel, far beyond that required of an ICE car or even a hybrid.

I have a work acquaintance that's owned a Prius forever. She's very interested in my Tesla and has asked for test ride, etc. I think about all I've been forced to learn over the past few months and shudder at the thought of recommending this car to the everyday driver. I would be able to help her learn about the car, but should I have to? Is a Tesla so far from being ready for primetime that it doesn't make sense for many drivers?
 

msjulie

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#3
My experience has been, when showing the car to others, is to explain that yes you will get used to the screen and not need gauges in front of you. I can't actually think of a single person I know right now w/o a smart phone so that is an easy comparison and seems to remove an initial "whoa I can't do this" response.

My biggest challenge, recently, is explaining that this very-smart-car may do things you might be alarmed at and currently those are not things you can disable permanently. Next to range anxiety - becoming less and less really - this is the only issue I've seen, and explaining beta software..
 

shareef777

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#5
I've always been a DIY'er and have a high technical aptitude in general. For a person like me, there was, by choice, a very steep learning curve before purchase. Now that I've had my Model 3 for almost two months, the learning continues on an almost daily basis. There's just so much to know that's not readily apparent, and the car does so many wacky things on a regular basis that require research. The knowledge required to own a Tesla is, I feel, far beyond that required of an ICE car or even a hybrid.

I have a work acquaintance that's owned a Prius forever. She's very interested in my Tesla and has asked for test ride, etc. I think about all I've been forced to learn over the past few months and shudder at the thought of recommending this car to the everyday driver. I would be able to help her learn about the car, but should I have to? Is a Tesla so far from being ready for primetime that it doesn't make sense for many drivers?
At the end of the day a person can adjust settings to make the vehicle as close to driving an ICE as possible. All the other bells and whistles can be ignored driving the vehicle day to day as it’s still a vehicle with 4 wheels and two pedals :)

The only thing I highlight to less tech savvy potential buyers is the limits of having to charge. i.e., be sure to plug in almost daily as you never know when you’ll have an unexpected 200mi day running errands around town. The loss of conveniently being able to top off your available range in minutes is key for those that do a lot of commuting throughout the day.
 

GDN

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#8
I've always been a DIY'er and have a high technical aptitude in general. For a person like me, there was, by choice, a very steep learning curve before purchase. Now that I've had my Model 3 for almost two months, the learning continues on an almost daily basis. There's just so much to know that's not readily apparent, and the car does so many wacky things on a regular basis that require research. The knowledge required to own a Tesla is, I feel, far beyond that required of an ICE car or even a hybrid.

I have a work acquaintance that's owned a Prius forever. She's very interested in my Tesla and has asked for test ride, etc. I think about all I've been forced to learn over the past few months and shudder at the thought of recommending this car to the everyday driver. I would be able to help her learn about the car, but should I have to? Is a Tesla so far from being ready for primetime that it doesn't make sense for many drivers?
I don't see it this way. You can let it be daunting, but if you even just drive it for a month or two with the same basic features as most other cars, it truly is a simple beast. Other than NOA and features along those lines it is only HOW you operate the car, not what are the features you operate.

Those that want the car and technology will fall right in line.
 

shareef777

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#10
My wife is anything but technical and for months I tried to convince her to get a Model 3. She finally caved and now she'd never go back. She picked up on everything very quickly!
Ugh, trying to persuade my wife to go for the Y. She’s not having it :-(. Guess I have a year to change her mind.
 

SalisburySam

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#12
Not sure a person’s technical familiarity is all that relevant. Our experiences have shown that, for both of us, how willing we are to accept very-much-unexpected anomalies and respond to them is far more important. Things you don’t expect can be either an annoyance (nag message), an inconvenience (wiper controls), a surprise (you don’t turn your car on or off), or a downright safety hazard (unintended hard braking). Examples: the Auto-anything nags are just that, annoyances that over time become background noise and happen less frequently as you learn to drive the “Tesla way” torquing the steering wheel frequently. The first few unintended hard braking events test both the reaction times of any drivers behind you and your own and your passengers’ sphincter control. If the latter happened to some of my family including my wife who is technically degreed, skilled, and working in the field, the car would have been traded immediately. And she bought the car as a gift for me.
 

Vin

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#13
My father in law (75 years old) just bought a smartphone this year). He test drove my 3 and was very comfortable driving us for miles. He actually liked the screen being in the center so he could focus on the drive.
He now wants one. A 3 is easier to drive than gas cars, and the screen is less complicated than an ipad or phone.
 

shareef777

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#14
This is great timing, but here's a short story on this topic:

My brother is in town on vacation and yesterday he taught me something new about my car. Mind you he's never driven or even been in a Tesla, and he's not even remotely into tech.

While showing him AP on a local road I complained about how AP on local roads sucks. I explained that when I change lanes it disables AP and I'd have to re-engage it. He immediately asks, do you do the short or long pull of the stalk. I explain I did the short as it's just a lane change (the long is generally reserved for full turns, from my ICE days). He tells me that it makes more sense to do the long pull to engage an automated lane change and low and behold AP on local roads is awesome!

So yes, even the less tech savvy people will likely surprise you and find the little tidbits of these cars and enjoy it just as much as we do.
 

MelindaV

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#15
This is great timing, but here's a short story on this topic:

My brother is in town on vacation and yesterday he taught me something new about my car. Mind you he's never driven or even been in a Tesla, and he's not even remotely into tech.

While showing him AP on a local road I complained about how AP on local roads sucks. I explained that when I change lanes it disables AP and I'd have to re-engage it. He immediately asks, do you do the short or long pull of the stalk. I explain I did the short as it's just a lane change (the long is generally reserved for full turns, from my ICE days). He tells me that it makes more sense to do the long pull to engage an automated lane change and low and behold AP on local roads is awesome!

So yes, even the less tech savvy people will likely surprise you and find the little tidbits of these cars and enjoy it just as much as we do.
did you then tell him AP is currently designed to be used on limited access freeways and lot local roads?
 
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#16
I enjoy the car but it is for people who like to tinker and get on forums to figure out why it doesn’t work again. It’s not for the mainstream person, too many issues that constantly need addressing. It’s relaxing to hop back in my Honda and not have to wonder what’s it’s going to do wacky this trip, such as phantom brake, emergency lane change, folding mirrors, or any of the other things a normal car would never do or nobody would buy it.

So yes, I hesitate recommending it to the average person. To someone who buys the latest phone, downloads the newest software the first day, and loves to tinker I tell them they will love it.
 

FogNoggin

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#17
I enjoy the car but it is for people who like to tinker and get on forums to figure out why it doesn’t work again. It’s not for the mainstream person, too many issues that constantly need addressing. It’s relaxing to hop back in my Honda and not have to wonder what’s it’s going to do wacky this trip, such as phantom brake, emergency lane change, folding mirrors, or any of the other things a normal car would never do or nobody would buy it.

So yes, I hesitate recommending it to the average person. To someone who buys the latest phone, downloads the newest software the first day, and loves to tinker I tell them they will love it.
I agree with every word. You've mirrored my thoughts perfectly.
 

Tesla Newbie

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#18
I find it hard to justify the car to friends/relatives who see software updates on their iPhones (for example) as inconvenient intrusions on their busy schedules instead of welcome visitors with bags of new and interesting tricks. As any person who helps friends with their computers/phones knows, there is a large group of people out there who resent that their devices may suddenly behave differently, regardless of whether others believe the changes are in their best interest. When I tell these friends that the Tesla comes standard with periodic (sometimes frequent) OTA updates that change the experience, their collective heads explode.
 

shareef777

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#19
Well I just had basic cruise control fail on me yesterday (software bug). That alone will prevent me from recommending a Tesla to anyone that's pretty much not an IT tech. A basic enough feature as that shouldn't be failing. At the very least allow me to set a speed limit (without the adaptive option). Really sucked driving on the highway for 40mi without any sort of CC. Especially with the regenerative braking as any effort to relax my foot was met with a sudden decrease in speed.
 

Johnm6875

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#20
The Model 3 started out as a replacement for my 93 RX7. Our Outback was the primary but, not any longer. My not-very-technologically-adept wife universally chooses the Tesla, even for long trips/vacations. Over the past ten months the Outback was driven less than 2,000 of 19,000 miles and most of that was early on. She rarely uses the autopilot but loves everything else. She even did a necessary two button re-boot without my help last December.

On the other hand, I have told people it's an incredibly capable enthusiasts car not a "refrigerator."