DIY: Front Brake Pad Replacement Tesla Model 3 Non-P

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MountainPass

Top-Contributor
Joined
May 15, 2018
Messages
525
Location
Toronto, Ontario
Tesla Owner
Model 3
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Country
#1
Hello again friends!

Yesterday we needed to swap out our Ferrodo DS2500 track pads for our MPP Page Mill Street Pads (shameless plug) so I took a few pictures to show everyone how simple it is!

If you bought generic F40 shaped pads, you may need to add an hour of belt sanding to make them fit since they will be too thick.

Time required: 30-45 minutes

Difficulty: 2/5

Tools required:
- Floor Jack
- Jack Stands
- Torque Wrench
- 21mm 1/2" drive socket
- Hammer (preferably not claw type)
- Thin pin punch
- Flathead Screwdrivers or small Pry Bars x2
- A good attitude and an open mind



1. Arrange your tools like a surgeon, being organized is the key to efficiency



2. Jack up the car and remove the front wheel, you will now be looking at the front brakes



3. Using the hammer and punch, carefully tap the pins out of the caliper




Tap them both halfway out!





4. Fully remove the top pin, you may need to twist and wiggle it a bit, the anti-rattle clip is holding pressure on it. It helps to use a finger and push in the anti-rattle clip.

The clip will swing down, then removing the bottom pin will be easy!



5. You did it! Now keep your parts organized so you don't lose those pins!



6. Remove the pads, they should slide out easily, or a little wiggling may be required.



7. Your new pads are likely thicker than your old pads, if they are, you will need to push back the caliper pistons. Grab your two flathead screwdrivers or small pry bars, and press them in at the same time with a smooth application of force. Be careful not to damage the dust boots. They will move slowly.



Install one pad, then move on to the other half of the caliper.

8. Install your new pads! You may want to use brake lubricant on the top and bottom of the pads. We change them frequently so we don't bother. The lubricant will also attract dirt/grime.



9. Install the pins and anti-rattle clip in reverse order. Gently tap the pins until they are seated, they should protrude out of the other side just like when you started. Make sure the pins go through the holes in the pads.

10. Install and torque your wheel



11. Now repeat the steps on the other side of the car

12. Important - Press the brake pedal 5 times before you drive the car. This pushes the pistons out into the pads/rotors. If you forget you might not have a brake pedal the first time you try to stop!

13. You're done!

There is no complicated bedding-in process for your new pads, just drive normally and try to avoid hard stops using the brakes for the first 100 miles.

That's it, enjoy!

- MPP Team

Here is the link to our Street Pad Upgrade for anyone interested:
https://www.mountainpassperformance.com/product/mpp-page-mill-street-brake-pads/
 
Last edited:

Ole1

Active member
Joined
Jul 7, 2018
Messages
78
Location
long beach
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#3
than you !
Did you use conventional jackstands (not those funky expensive fits over the jack type) ?

I assume you have jacked up and took wheels off of your M3 a bunch of times .... do you use jackstands ?
... are you able to use them in any place other than the tesla recommended jack points ?
.... if so, can you post pictures and/or a description of where you pace the jackstands on an M3 ?

( got our M3 a week ago, haven't jacked it up yet ... will be changing pads as soon as I wear out the stock ones)
 
Joined
May 29, 2018
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Aliso Viejo, CA 92656, United States
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#4
Jackstands are always a good idea especially if you're going to be under the car and/or working for an extended period of time. Don't rely on the jack. You can feel the jack points under the car as they have a hole. There are some vendors who sell a jack pad that goes into that hole. I just used the standard HF 2.5ton low profile straight up with no issue. I would not use them anywhere except the jack points or frame cross member due to the fact that the entire bottom is a battery pack. The Jack point is more than enough to get both wheels off the ground on each side from a single point.
 

MountainPass

Top-Contributor
Joined
May 15, 2018
Messages
525
Location
Toronto, Ontario
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#5
We use the jack stands as a back up in case the jack fails, you are depending on a small hydraulic seal to hold all that weight. I also slide an aero wheel under the car just in case the jack and jack stand both fail for some reason. Better to damage a wheel than get hurt.
 

Ole1

Active member
Joined
Jul 7, 2018
Messages
78
Location
long beach
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#6
thank you again sasha,

I am still trying to find a good place to set an M3 on jack stands, other than the jack points

Have you ever set an M3 on jack stands and removed you floor jack ?
(if so, where do you put the jackstands ? other than the jack points)

Has anyone set an M3 on jack stands using the "frame cross member" which ehansen007 alludes to ?
Pictures ?
 

beastmode13

Well-known member
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2018
Messages
241
Location
Mountain View, CA
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#9
thank you again sasha,

I am still trying to find a good place to set an M3 on jack stands, other than the jack points

Have you ever set an M3 on jack stands and removed you floor jack ?
(if so, where do you put the jackstands ? other than the jack points)

Has anyone set an M3 on jack stands using the "frame cross member" which ehansen007 alludes to ?
Pictures ?
Jack the car up way up from the front jack point, this will lift the entire side up. Slide the jack stand under the rear jack point, then slowly lower the jack until the rear rest in jackstand. Then lower the jack completely to replace it with a jackstand. Place a wheel between the two jackstands as insurance. Repeat on the other side of the car. This is what I have done with my other cars for years without any issue. One addition that I’ll be using is the fancy jack pucks for 3. Also I’ll experiment with jacking rear or front first. The 3 is not too unbalanced front/rear, so it might not matter. Otherwise, from my experience, jacking the heavy end up and getting the lighter end on jackstand first provides the most amount of clearance I need to work under the car.

Full disclosure. I’m not a professional mechanic, just a guy that like to work on his own cars for street and track days.