DIY Ceramic Coating?

m3_4_wifey

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#1
Hi Everyone,
We just got our red AWD Model 3 yesterday! I'm lining up a professional to do the PPF for the front end, which hopefully will help with the gravel roads we have in the Northeast. My wife thought I was crazy for putting a wrap on the car, but she has come around.

Going the next step is the Ceramic Coating. The added protection and ease of cleaning from a ceramic coating appeals to me, but I don't want to break the bank. We are money constrained paying for the car, so I think that getting both the PPF and ceramic coating done professionally is not possible. I might want to try the DIY approach of a ceramic coating, but don't want to ruin the money that we spent having the PPF professionally done. Am I being penny wise and dollar foolish with going with a DIY ceramic coating product? For reference, I have not washed many cars in the past, and didn't know about swirl marks until I started breathing everything Tesla for two plus years. However, maybe I'll turn a new leaf and enjoy washing our new beautiful red Tesla. :)

My other thought is that a DIY solution probably needs to wait as it's starting to get colder in Vermont, and I'm not sure I'll have time this fall. Maybe the best time to do this would be the spring-summer time when I can jump when the temperatures are more ideal for the ceramic cure. Anyone else do the DIY Ceramic coating and have good or bad luck with it?

This guy did his own cermaic coating, and probably more thorough than I will ever do. I also don't know if any of the steps need to be modified for areas with PPF.

Thanks in advance for anyone how has thoughts or experiences on the topic.
 

IPv6Freely

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#2
I'm also curious. Specifically whether the ceramic coating kits you can get on Amazon are any good or just snake oil junk.
 

96s46p

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#3
I'm also curious. Specifically whether the ceramic coating kits you can get on Amazon are any good or just snake oil junk.
Both. There are so many prosumer coatings now and also so many poor quality coatings even $3 coatings from China. Do your research.
 

Jason F

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#4
Get the CarPro CQuartz UK. It is made for applying in colder temperature. I think it is about $85. Do it as soon as you get your car back from wrapping when it is in its cleanest condition. Very easy to apply and yes it really works. They make the professional versions as well but those require heat lamps. I did it myself (with no PPF). I put a double coating on the front.
 

3V Pilot

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#5
I agree with the CQuartz recommendation above. I've done 3 cars now, started with my daughters car to test it out and then did my Model 3 and a friends. The stuff is super easy to apply looks great and will last a long time. The prep work takes the most time but on a new car I just do a good wash then spray on 80% Isopropyl Alcohol and wipe off, then apply the CQuartz. Lots of info online and lots of great YouTube videos to watch before you try it for the first time.
 

P&J

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#6
The paint job on our red M3 is really very very good. I have gone over the entire car with the ceramic Gyeon Mohs once and the front twice and front bumper 3 times (max recommended). Still have one coat to go from the front fenders back. In the process of prepping I only found 3 small defects on the whole car, all of which hand buffed out with a light buff (very fine compound). VIN 16xxx so they must have locked in on the paint process from the earlier posts that I have read.

Applying the Gyeon Mohs is really a non pro required job in my opinion. I only post this for those of us who have “blown the 35k budget to bits” with the keeper of the purse and still would like a ceramic coating to minimize the car wash effort going forward. Check amazon for the current kit. I will end up using 2 50 ml kits (hint-buy 2 kits so you can get done all in one go) to get a full 3 coats. A bag of yellow microfiber rags from Costco works as well as the premium Gyeon ones at a home handyman price.

Time. The process requires 1 hour between coats so plan for a day if you are going to do the full 3 coats, however the process is nowhere near as muscle wrenching as the old wax and buff process. (I am > 70 and have the t-shirt). It is really a wipe on wipe off process.

Top coat update: the Syncro Kit now has a different topcoat called Skin which came in my kit along with Cure. It is easy to put on and is longer lasting and even more hydrophobic than the Cure product. The cure can be used months later as a maintenance top coat.

Patrick


A couple of links reviewing Ceramic coatings that drove me to Gyeon:

Edit : you will need to move the slider to the beginning of this youtube video --sorry


A good breakdown on Gyeon related products (what to do with your leftover Skin and Cure)


https://www.autogeekonline.net/foru...ing-maintenance-bathe-vs-wetcoat-vs-cure.html
 
Last edited:

m3_4_wifey

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#7
Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I think the main point I see is that putting on the coating is probably not that hard. It is just that it will be freeze any swirl marks or other defects in the paint. I'm going to talk to my PPF guy to see what he thinks of my cars paint job, to see if any areas really should be addressed before going with a coating.

I haven't seen a video where they do a PPF and then go right into a ceramic coating, so if you know of any videos like that. I would love to see the transition steps. Do you need to wait for the film to cure, or is it advisable to wait weeks to see if there are issues with application of the PPF? If you went straight from PPF install to ceramic coating, would you still use rubbing alcohol to make sure the film is clean before putting on the coating?
 

GDN

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#8
I would agree, the coatings are not hard to apply, just follow a few simple rules that each might have for prep, but making sure you have a clean prepped car is the labor and prereq..

I second the vote for Gyeon Mohs. I can't compare it to anything, it is the only coating I've used. I found several good reviews and just did some research. It seems to be one of the least mentioned on most of these forums, but I love the ease it went on with and the beading and protection it seems to still be delivering 3 months in.

Before I did my Model 3 I did a 4 year old F150 which hasn't been in a garage a single night of it's life. I used a clay bar first, then polisher and light swirl removing compound and then the Gyeon Mohs. It looked like a mirror. I've been very impressed. Check out this post and a few more following it for an update on the car and process Niko's excursions!
 

ltphoto

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#9
Go ahead and do the ceramic coating yourself. It's not any harder than a wax job, and easier than any old style paste wax. People have built it up into this big mysterious process, but it really is just a next generation coating that is longer lasting than wax coatings. I used the CQuarz product and there were no issues. Great results.
 

Jason@FreshStartDetail

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#13
I professionally apply several ceramic coatings weekly (four applied to Model 3s just this week) and here's my recommendation to the DIY crowd, try Gloss Coat by Optimum Polymer Technologies. It's easy to install even for the first-timer and doesn't need curing lamps or any heat for that matter after installation. You'll get at least 3 years out of it, and longer if properly washed and maintained.

I don't earn anything from recommending Opti products but I'm still happy to have a quick Q&A phone conversation with you to answer your questions... I just LOVE Tesla M3s and really LOVE IT when owners take the initiative to keep them looking great.
 

scaots

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#14
I have used Gtechniq crystal serum light and EXO v3 myself. It went on very easy and gave a great finish. It does take some time and more time for prep. Someone that has some experience with multiple products may have a better recommendation, but I have no complaints about it. I also had my 3 professionally done with Ceramic Pro and the coating is clearly better. It feels better and stuff cleans off even easier than the one I did myself.
 

VGohil

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#15
I am not very good at this doing myself. Any recommendations where I can get it done for a reasonable price In Toronto area?
 

JWardell

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#16
I did my own ceramic, and used @FEYNLAB ceramic lite:
https://www.feynlab.com/product/ceramic_lite/

I was going to get a CQuartz product off Amazon, but there are a lot of reports of issues with sensitivity to moisture--it can't get damp for 48 hours after application, and results in permanent spots. I don't have a garage and can't control New England weather.
Not only was the feynlab cheaper but it is not as picky. It applied easily just like many other wipe on/buff off waxes that I have used over the years. I'm amazed by the smoothness and it makes washing the car much easier.
I look forward to applying another coat in the spring.

I recommend also purchasing the applicator pad to apply it, and the plush 370 to buff off. Props to them for selling these without a huge markup.
 

garsh

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#17
I did this as well, but it took me three tries to get it right. I detailed what went wrong in a blog post:


But now that I've corrected my mistakes, the end result looks great. It feels so smooth. And once you know what to do, it's actually just as easy as waxing a car. And if it lasts a year, it will be well worth the extra expense.

I look forward to applying another coat in the spring.
Are there any tricks to applying additional coats in the future? I assume a good wash and clay bar. But the instructions that Feynlab provides for putting on multiple coats mentions that it will look cloudy if you wait longer than three hours to put on another coat. So what are the repercussions for re-applying in the future?
 

justflie

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#18
I bought some hydrosilex. Once i take delivery, I'll be applying in lieu of wax. This will be my first ceramic coating.
 

JWardell

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#19
I did this as well, but it took me three tries to get it right. I detailed what went wrong in a blog post:


But now that I've corrected my mistakes, the end result looks great. It feels so smooth. And once you know what to do, it's actually just as easy as waxing a car. And if it lasts a year, it will be well worth the extra expense.

Are there any tricks to applying additional coats in the future? I assume a good wash and clay bar. But the instructions that Feynlab provides for putting on multiple coats mentions that it will look cloudy if you wait longer than three hours to put on another coat. So what are the repercussions for re-applying in the future?
You probably didn't need to polish to remove and do it all over again with another bottle, you probably just had some thicker and thinner spots, and the thicker spots take longer to cure. I had this too, and I've seen it with some other polymer waxes; similarly it takes a little more buffing as it cures over the next day or two. But yes...lots of light helps seeing this.

As for the multiple coats, you can certainly add more months later; their instructions are for adding multiple coats on the same day. You don't want to add a coat once it gets past a certain point in the curing process, so waiting an hour is OK as they will just meld and cure together, or wait a week or so for it to fully cure and then you can add another.
 

Clubhops10

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#20
I'll attempt my ceramic coating DIY this weekend, over the PPF I've just installed myself on the front end. When reviewing a products I decided to try the Gyeon Syncro which has a base and a top coat. This is probably way more than needed but I have enough Amazon points to give it a shot. Will report how the install goes and how it holds up once complete.