Different Tire Width?

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#1
I ordered a Model 3 AWD with the 19" sport wheels. The owner's manual notes the size of the tires to be 235/40R19, but I am wondering if a different tire width would also fit? I want to purchase Nokian WR G4 19" all-weather tires as I live in the Northeast. The 19" ones come in the below sizes. Can I use any of the below on the stock 19" Tesla Sport Wheels?

245/45R19
255/40R19
255/35R19
 

SoFlaModel3

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#2
I ordered a Model 3 AWD with the 19" sport wheels. The owner's manual notes the size of the tires to be 235/40R19, but I am wondering if a different tire width would also fit? I want to purchase Nokian WR G4 19" all-weather tires as I live in the Northeast. The 19" ones come in the below sizes. Can I use any of the below on the stock 19" Tesla Sport Wheels?

245/45R19
255/40R19
255/35R19
I am not a tire expert by any means (calling @Mad Hungarian for the assist), but when tinkering with tire sizes you will alter the rolling diameter of the car and effect your odometer and speedometer among other things.

235/40 is a 3.7” sidewall

245/45 is a 4.34” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 68.2 MPH.

255/40 is a 4.02” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 66.6 MPH.

255/35 is a 3.51” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 64.1 MPH.
 

Mad Hungarian

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#3
I am not a tire expert by any means (calling @Mad Hungarian for the assist), but when tinkering with tire sizes you will alter the rolling diameter of the car and effect your odometer and speedometer among other things.

235/40 is a 3.7” sidewall

245/45 is a 4.34” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 68.2 MPH.

255/40 is a 4.02” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 66.6 MPH.

255/35 is a 3.51” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 64.1 MPH.
@SoFlaModel3 's numbers are just about bang on, to illustrate just little more clearly I've added the exact % differences in O.D. and resulting issues.

245/45 is a 4.34” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 68.2 MPH - 4.69% taller, will almost certainly rub on the upper link portion of the front steering knuckle (see what should now be an oh-so-familiar-looking image below as to why you must carefully watch front tire height on Model 3).

255/40 is a 4.02” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 66.6 MPH - 2.22% taller, will fit but going wider in winter is always a bad idea unless you're going REALLY wide and the intent is to float over snow fields a la Icelandic Artic Truck style. Still, if you insisted on having this model of tire and were willing to take it real easy in the winter this is the size I'd pick.

255/35 is a 3.51” sidewall and when your speedometer says 65 MPH you will really be going 64.1 MPH - 1.54% smaller, will fit just fine. But if going wider is bad, going wider and lower is even worse. Sidewall flexibility is key on low-friction surfaces for maintaining traction in transitional maneuvers. The lovely sharp steering response that these very low profile, rigid performances tires give you in summer will work against you on snow and most especially on ice. You want your tires to be as sloth-like as you can stand in such situations. Think about walking across an ice rink in your socks. No sudden moves please :)

So if a gun was held to my head I'd pick number two. But for an area that gets real snow and cold I'd much prefer something in the OE size, especially when using an all season, even one as good as the WR G4. While it's fun to have the extra dry road grip and good looks a wider tire offers in summer, you are almost always much closer to reaching traction limits on the average day in winter and should choose a model and size for year-round use accordingly.


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Last edited:
Joined
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#4
@Mad Hungarian - thank you so much for breaking that down for me. What I will do is use the tires that come on the car for this winter (and just drive another car when it's too harsh out), and I hope by November 2019 that Nokian has come out with the 235/40R19 for the WR G4!