ContiSilent for Model 3 Tires?

  • SUPPORT THE SITE AND ENJOY A PREMIUM EXPERIENCE!
    Welcome to Tesla Owners Online, four years young! For a low subscription fee, you will receive access to an ad-free version of TOO. We now offer yearly memberships! You can subscribe via this direct link:
    https://teslaownersonline.com/account/upgrades

    SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL!
    Did you know we have a YouTube channel that's all about Tesla? Lots of Tesla information, fun, vlogs, product reviews, and a weekly Tesla Owners Online Podcast as well!

Brokedoc

Kick-Gas Contributor
Joined
May 28, 2017
Messages
1,715
Location
New York
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model X
#1
I found out something interesting about the Continental Tires used in the S and X and wondered if Tesla also uses this in the Model 3 since they also wear Continentals. Perhaps @Mad Hungarian can contribute.

I just had to have my tire repaired due to a nail. When he took the tire off, he found this which isn't very common.

20180621_164700-jpg.10580


Apparently Continental applies a layer of foam inside some of their tires to reduce tire noise by 9 db which is a huge amount (every 10db on the scale is double the noise IIRC) To repair the nail, they need to cut away some of the foam to patch the hole and they can glue the foam back if they take it off in one chunk.

Continental only does this for some car manufacturers that request it (I'm sure it costs more money). Just curious if this is something seen in the Model 3 also.

http://elevatingsound.com/new-continental-contisilent-tire-technology-to-sharply-reduce-road-noise/
https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-noise-reducing-continental-tire-foam-technology/
 

Mad Hungarian

Resident TOO Wheel/Tire Guru
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
1,107
Location
Montreal, QC
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#3
I found out something interesting about the Continental Tires used in the S and X and wondered if Tesla also uses this in the Model 3 since they also wear Continentals. Perhaps @Mad Hungarian can contribute.

I just had to have my tire repaired due to a nail. When he took the tire off, he found this which isn't very common.

View attachment 10580

Apparently Continental applies a layer of foam inside some of their tires to reduce tire noise by 9 db which is a huge amount (every 10db on the scale is double the noise IIRC) To repair the nail, they need to cut away some of the foam to patch the hole and they can glue the foam back if they take it off in one chunk.

Continental only does this for some car manufacturers that request it (I'm sure it costs more money). Just curious if this is something seen in the Model 3 also.

http://elevatingsound.com/new-continental-contisilent-tire-technology-to-sharply-reduce-road-noise/
https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-noise-reducing-continental-tire-foam-technology/
Yes, can confirm that the Model 3 19" Contis have this as well as the 18" Michelins, and many other tire makers are now using this trick on selected models. Car and Driver actually did a back-to-back test on a Model S a while back and although the results were definitely measurable on the meter, subjectively they found it hard to notice the difference.
 

oneshortguy

Active member
Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
129
Location
Los Angeles, California
Country
Country
#4
Yes, can confirm that the Model 3 19" Contis have this as well.
And it isn't limited to Conti, many other tire makers are now using this trick on selected models. Car and Driver actually did a back-to-back test on a Model S a while back and although the results were definitely measurable on the meter, subjectively they found it hard to notice the difference.
I was told by a tire shop that Tesla's tire specs have the foam and the same tire that isn't Tesla spec can come without the foam. You can order them both ways as a non-Tesla spec or is it exclusive to Tesla?
 

Mad Hungarian

Resident TOO Wheel/Tire Guru
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
1,107
Location
Montreal, QC
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#5
I was told by a tire shop that Tesla's tire specs have the foam and the same tire that isn't Tesla spec can come without the foam. You can order them both ways as a non-Tesla spec or is it exclusive to Tesla?
According to what I see in their catalog, the ProContact RX in the 235/40R19 size was manufactured specifically for Tesla, both the regular and the ContiSilent part numbers have the Tesla "T0" homologation symbols in the descriptions.
Note that the distribution isn't exclusive to Tesla, any Continental tire dealer can order either version.

upload_2018-6-22_13-25-34-png.10585
 

skygraff

Top-Contributor
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
490
Location
Chicago IL
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#6
Yes, can confirm that the Model 3 19" Contis have this as well as the 18" Michelins, and many other tire makers are now using this trick on selected models. Car and Driver actually did a back-to-back test on a Model S a while back and although the results were definitely measurable on the meter, subjectively they found it hard to notice the difference.
Does anybody know if the Michelins with the foam are labeled as such? Mine don’t have the headphones per Michelin’s site. Based on those tests, I’m not sure it matters but I would be curious to note if these tires are supposed to be quieter than potential replacements in the future.
 

Mad Hungarian

Resident TOO Wheel/Tire Guru
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
1,107
Location
Montreal, QC
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#7
Does anybody know if the Michelins with the foam are labeled as such? Mine don’t have the headphones per Michelin’s site. Based on those tests, I’m not sure it matters but I would be curious to note if these tires are supposed to be quieter than potential replacements in the future.
I reached out to Michelin on their handy little messaging app and here's the official response:

upload_2018-7-24_19-14-2-png.12053


So they confirm it does have it, they perhaps just didn't include the logo on the sidewall for whatever reason.
 

sakaike

Active member
Joined
Mar 27, 2017
Messages
77
Location
Huntington Beach, CA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#8
I asked this in the rim damage thread, but perhaps this thread has a slightly different audience: Will those slime and goo tire repair kits work effectively given the foam insert? One guy said it should, and his rationale was that Tesla sells their own branded tire repair kit using this technique. They wouldn't sell this kit if it wouldn't work, was the theory. Does anyone here have any thoughts or experience to opine?
 

garsh

Dis Member
Moderator
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2016
Messages
13,284
Location
Pittsburgh PA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#9
I asked this in the rim damage thread, but perhaps this thread has a slightly different audience: Will those slime and goo tire repair kits work effectively given the foam insert?
Not the answer you wanted, but the answer you need:

Never, ever use the tire slime. It damages both the tire and the TPMS sensor and you'll have to replace both. The slime should ONLY ever be used in a dire emergency, such as there's no hope of a tow truck coming to get you in your current location.
 

Mad Hungarian

Resident TOO Wheel/Tire Guru
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
1,107
Location
Montreal, QC
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#10
I asked this in the rim damage thread, but perhaps this thread has a slightly different audience: Will those slime and goo tire repair kits work effectively given the foam insert? One guy said it should, and his rationale was that Tesla sells their own branded tire repair kit using this technique. They wouldn't sell this kit if it wouldn't work, was the theory. Does anyone here have any thoughts or experience to opine?
Tesla's kit definitely works to get you mobile again, but they say once used you have to replace both the tire and the TPMS.
See product description here.
Now I suspect this is because Tesla equips its vehicles with a variety of different tires from different manufacturers and their individual policies on gel repairs may vary. I also suspect they are also playing it very safe from a legal liability standpoint so as not to have any issues if the tire fails or the TPMS sensor malfunctions after repair.

To get specifics on how the gel may or may not affect the ContiSilent foam liner I reached out to our technical rep at Continental, who in turn deferred to HQ on the matter. Here's their official position on it:

Conti Comfort Kit and/or Conti Mobility Kit will also work on ContiSilent tires - but this are "temporary mobility aids" and should not be considered as a permanent repair.
Other manufacturers sealing gels might or might not damage the foam liner - we can not give a general statement on that.
For a permanent repair of ContiSilent tires we recommend to follow our repair instructions.


So Continental has tested and approved their own gel repair kit for use with the ContiSilent tires.
Here's a link to the kit.
The ContiSilent tires can also be repaired conventionally with a patch, but one must follow the specific procedure (English starts on pg. 9).

I also asked if the TPMS sensor remains reusable afterwards and was told that yes, as long as the unit is properly cleaned there should be no issue, and Continental Canada has had zero reports to date of TPMS failure after use of the kit.

Note that the above is specific to use of the ContiMobility kit with Continental tires.

I next reached out to Michelin, who say that there's no problem repairing their Acoustic tires in the same fashion as the Continental, and they go a step further and say you can even glue back in the piece of foam liner removed during the patching procedure.

However they don't seem too keen about the gel repair part, here's what I got back from their customer service folks:

upload_2018-7-26_9-51-38-png.12171


As I said earlier, I think this explains why Tesla has to have a general policy on recommending that the tire must be replaced after a gel sealant is used.
But clearly there is no "one-size-fits-all" answer on the matter.
 

Attachments

@gravityrydr

Top-Contributor
Joined
Apr 12, 2016
Messages
404
Location
Illinois
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#12
Tesla's kit definitely works to get you mobile again, but they say once used you have to replace both the tire and the TPMS.
See product description here.
Now I suspect this is because Tesla equips its vehicles with a variety of different tires from different manufacturers and their individual policies on gel repairs may vary. I also suspect they are also playing it very safe from a legal liability standpoint so as not to have any issues if the tire fails or the TPMS sensor malfunctions after repair.

To get specifics on how the gel may or may not affect the ContiSilent foam liner I reached out to our technical rep at Continental, who in turn deferred to HQ on the matter. Here's their official position on it:

Conti Comfort Kit and/or Conti Mobility Kit will also work on ContiSilent tires - but this are "temporary mobility aids" and should not be considered as a permanent repair.
Other manufacturers sealing gels might or might not damage the foam liner - we can not give a general statement on that.
For a permanent repair of ContiSilent tires we recommend to follow our repair instructions.


So Continental has tested and approved their own gel repair kit for use with the ContiSilent tires.
Here's a link to the kit.
The ContiSilent tires can also be repaired conventionally with a patch, but one must follow the specific procedure (English starts on pg. 9).

I also asked if the TPMS sensor remains reusable afterwards and was told that yes, as long as the unit is properly cleaned there should be no issue, and Continental Canada has had zero reports to date of TPMS failure after use of the kit.

Note that the above is specific to use of the ContiMobility kit with Continental tires.

I next reached out to Michelin, who say that there's no problem repairing their Acoustic tires in the same fashion as the Continental, and they go a step further and say you can even glue back in the piece of foam liner removed during the patching procedure.

However they don't seem too keen about the gel repair part, here's what I got back from their customer service folks:

View attachment 12171

As I said earlier, I think this explains why Tesla has to have a general policy on recommending that the tire must be replaced after a gel sealant is used.
But clearly there is no "one-size-fits-all" answer on the matter.


I was considering getting the Tesla tire inflator/repair kit. After reading this I'm just getting a regular portable inflator and tire repair plugs.
 

Attachments

mswlogo

Top-Contributor
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
723
Location
MA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#13
Conti Comfort Kit and/or Conti Mobility Kit will also work on ContiSilent tires - but this are "temporary mobility aids" and should not be considered as a permanent repair.
Other manufacturers sealing gels might or might not damage the foam liner - we can not give a general statement on that.
For a permanent repair of ContiSilent tires we recommend to follow our repair instructions.

So Continental has tested and approved their own gel repair kit for use with the ContiSilent tires.
Here's a link to the kit.
Don't get me wrong I appreciate you reaching out to HQ.

But based on a hunk of text, that I had to dig hard for, buried on a forum I'm good to go?

It sure would be nice if this statement was on the product if it's true (on the goop machine or the tire) even in fine print.

I also love how these companies say have the tire and TPMS inspected by an expert? Who would take on the liability that it's still good?
Even the Video for the Conti Mobility Kit implies a brand new wheel is installed (even the rim) ;)

I'd also think it would be nice if Tesla would clearly state that it's compatible with all their acoustic tires.

My guess is, it's a legal requirement in some states to have a unit like this included with car if it has no spare or no run flats.
It's not a legal requirement that it works.

For the record I carry a plugging kit and tools to remove the wheel for better access to plug it. Especially if it's 0F out.
 

garsh

Dis Member
Moderator
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2016
Messages
13,284
Location
Pittsburgh PA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#14
But based on a hunk of text, that I had to dig hard for, buried on a forum I'm good to go?
The fact that you've investigated enough to question this is good. People are better off pulling off the road and calling a tow truck than using this stuff. For those of us who don't mind a little DIY, having a plug kit in the car to deal with punctures is a much better alternative as well.

That goop is just for emergencies where you can't wait for a tow truck, and don't mind sacrificing a whole tire and TPMS to get moving again. There's no guarantee that it will work, and I wouldn't count on it working. And I can't imagine that *any* place that repairs tires would be willing to attempt to clean off that goop and guarantee the work. You'd end up paying more in labor for them to perform the cleanup than you would on a new tire. And any tire with foam will be impossible to clean.

My guess is, it's a legal requirement in some states to have a unit like this included with car if it has no spare or no run flats.
Maybe. I can't find any such requirement in Pennsylvania. Normally, the national regulations on new cars are more strict than individual states' inspection requirements. But I also can't find any regulations for new car sales that require a fix kit when a spare tire isn't included (maybe someone else will have better luck searching: link). So the slime kits might be nothing more than a feature to make new car buyers feel more at ease about not having a spare tire included.
 

Klaus-rf

Top-Contributor
Joined
Mar 6, 2019
Messages
627
Location
Southern (Oro Valley), AZ
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#15
^
Run-Flat tires have eliminated the idea of carrying a spare or tire fix kit.
Of course they (run-flat tires) are heavier, noisier, have poorer handling and are more expensive.

They are only intended to get you to the next tire replacement facility.
 

mswlogo

Top-Contributor
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
723
Location
MA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#16
The fact that you've investigated enough to question this is good. People are better off pulling off the road and calling a tow truck than using this stuff. For those of us who don't mind a little DIY, having a plug kit in the car to deal with punctures is a much better alternative as well.

That goop is just for emergencies where you can't wait for a tow truck, and don't mind sacrificing a whole tire and TPMS to get moving again. There's no guarantee that it will work, and I wouldn't count on it working. And I can't imagine that *any* place that repairs tires would be willing to attempt to clean off that goop and guarantee the work. You'd end up paying more in labor for them to perform the cleanup than you would on a new tire. And any tire with foam will be impossible to clean.


Maybe. I can't find any such requirement in Pennsylvania. Normally, the national regulations on new cars are more strict than individual states' inspection requirements. But I also can't find any regulations for new car sales that require a fix kit when a spare tire isn't included (maybe someone else will have better luck searching: link). So the slime kits might be nothing more than a feature to make new car buyers feel more at ease about not having a spare tire included.
I read something somewhere about it being required in some places. Tesla hints at something about it may be included with your car and if not you can buy one in the store. I think my Volt has a goop pump included.
 

John

Tech Founder
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
1,897
Location
California
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#17
I never felt like the foam-equipped Continental ProContact RX ContiSilent tires that came with my Model 3 were all that quiet. In fact, I felt like they were quite noisy, and i thought a lot about sound-reducing techniques elsewhere in the car. I kinda suspect the ContiSilent was a noisy tire that needed the foam to be acceptable.

When we had to replace a pair due to a pothole, I did once again buy the Continentals, for $270 each.

But when I just last week needed to replace all four, I switched to Goodyear Maxlife Assurance 19" tires for $175 each. 2-3X promised treadlife, at the expense of only a little traction. And so far, they don't seem any louder.

Time will tell if I miss the traction, and if my impression of the noise performance holds up in all conditions.

But what I WON'T miss is replacing them every 30K miles (48K km) for over $1100.

Here's the chart I used to shop. It's based on Tire Rack ratings (make of that what you will). The ContiSilents are not listed (sales volume too low), but from reading the overall customer ratings it would not fare that well.

P.S. The Goodyear MaxLife Assurance has a suitable load rating in 19", but not in 18".

tires-png.32729


Link to Page
 
Last edited:

John

Tech Founder
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
1,897
Location
California
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#18
I do carry a slime kit, to be able to get to civilization if I'm ever lightly leaking in the wilderness and Roadside either isn't available or would take too long. Not the world's most common set of circumstances, but there you go.

I'm reasonably optimistic that the slime won't ruin the TPMS (it's rated TPMS-safe, that's a thing). Instructions say to make sure the tire is rotated so that the valve stem is in the upper half of the tire (i.e. not at the bottom).

https://www.slime.com/us/products/dial/auto/sealants/tire-sensor-safe.php