Chevrolet Volt (Gen 2, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019) - discontinued Nov'18

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#1
Hopefully i won't be dismembered on this forum but...
I actually have a hard time understanding why folks are willing to spend so much more for Model 3.
I'd love to hear your thoughts on the matter!

I have a 2012 Volt (base model), but will have a much longer commute soon that'll force me to burn about $1,000 in gas per year even in this car that sips gas. I can charge on a simple 120v plug at work for 8-9 hours and get maybe 26-30 battery range miles that way. Have plenty of solar at home so no problem there.

I went and looked at a 2018 Volt and Model 3 in the flesh last weekend,
I guess for comparison:

Model 3 long-range battery and premium interior (cheapest possible configuration currently available -- and likely cheapest to also have a chance at the $7500 federal tax credit before it phases out). After that tax credit (assuming you're OK with the basic black paint and standard wheels) --> $41,500 (62% more)
2018 Volt Premium, after tax credit --> $26,000.
(I don't have a state incentive in my case).

So let's call it a $15,000 difference.

What do you get for that $15,000?
--Luxuriousness(?) OK, I concede I probably just don't get it. Model 3 does overall seem a little nicer/sleeker inside and out, but not $15k-worth IMHO. People say, "oh, compare this to compact luxury vehicles like BMW 3 series", etc. Then others say BMW's are way nicer. I have no idea as I don't have a sense of that stuff - nicest cars ever for me were my '12 Volt (base) and an '08 Odyssey EX-L. All I know is the Gen 2 Volt Premium interior seemed almost as nice as Model 3 overall to me. Model 3 had the cool AC vent and 15" Ipad screen. Chevy has the 8" Ipad screen, but also has the 2nd screen behind the wheel which is nice. AC is just as cold

--Performance. Model 3 is clearly quicker, but not enough for me to care. Some will care about this. Volt's still better than any "common man" ICE car I've ever had. I care about this when I need to zip out of someone's way when they're not looking and about to side-swipe me or something. Volt gets it done.
--5th seat. M3's 5th seat is a little more realistic. I'm 6'2". I sat in the Model 3 rear middle seat for about 3 minutes straight, and did the same in the Gen 2 Volt. I could sit in either for hours if needed and don't think it'd be a big deal (much better than economy air travel seating IMHO), but certainly my legs had a real space in the Model 3 and my hair was touching the glass roof, but I didn't have to bend my head down a bit as I did in the Volt.
--Fuel costs would likely be lower than Volt for most owners...but not $0 for either. See my real-world comparison below...very little difference.
--Future-proofness. Model 3 will probably age more elegantly (maybe)...minimalist interior should age well. 310 miles will be plenty for most anyone even when they come out with 400 and 500 mile range EV's in the next several years. Also, autopilot and self-driving capability can be purchased later, but at a hefty price (currently that'd be I think $10,000 more to add on both later). Also, Tesla has those over-the-air updates. It seems whenever those get significant buzz, it's because they've improved autopilot...other changes seem to be just window dressing.
--Trunk space. Model 3 has more trunk space overall by 4-5 cubic feet I believe.
--Greener. Model 3's a bit more green overall...never burns a drop of fossil fuels. Depends where your electricity comes from, but even if all coal you're still likely greener in the 3. Still, Volt can get you 80%+ the way there. Compare at https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-vehicles/electric-vehicles/ev-emissions-tool#.W0WKdqdKjDc Grams CO2 per mile: Volt: 132. Model 3: 77 (these numbers specific to where I am in SoCal, where the grid I about 40% renewables I've heard recently). For comparison, average ICE car is 38.

Sacrifices(?):
--Road-tripping. 310 mile range and SuperCharger network should handle all long-range needs OK, and my family does enjoy the SuperCharger road trip experience for it's novelty and futuristic feel. However, let's face it, a trip from Southern CA to Grand Canyon could be about 10 hours in a Volt and would be over 12 hours in a Model 3. SuperCharging simply takes longer. I don't think most will mind too much as a nice break to stretch and walk a little is a welcome respite in my opinion, but some will. And anytime your getting sleepy or in a rush to get somewhere, you'll be annoyed (I have been at times).
--Repair costs will be more for Tesla I'd think. Other than the battery/motor, I'd be comfortable taking Volt to any ASE-certified mechanic specializing in Chevy. Tesla not so much. Body work also costlier for Tesla from what I've heard due to many aluminum parts (although Model 3 has some steel).
--Maintenance costs probably a wash. Tesla should have low overall maintenance costs. Volt historically also super-low cost. I've had my 2012 for 3 years, bought it used non-CPO with 65,000 miles on it, appeared it hadn't been charged for months. Record showed clear title and an oil change 5 months prior. Since then I've spent $13 for another oil change (had a coupon), $300 for a recent scheduled maintenance that included checking battery coolant (probably a rip-off but I didn't want to blow off battery coolant), and I replaced the Delco battery for like $170. So call it $500 in 3 years.

OTHER:
Fuel cost comparison (and my real-life scenario)...Model 3 near $0, Gen 2 Volt $200/year.
My commute is up to higher elevation one way, back down the other. 1-2 days/week it'll be 35 miles each way, and I almost make it uphill on my '12 Volt getting typically about 30 miles battery-only range, then burn about 0.2 gal gas. In the Gen 2 Volt I'll get there all electric. I charge all day at work on just a 120 volt charger, usually get around 26 miles battery range, and always make it back all-electric. The other 3-4 days/week it's about 50 miles each way. On the uphill, I use 30 miles battery range, then burn about 2/3 gal of gas. Back down with my 26 miles of re-charge, I burn about another 1/4 gallon in my 2012 Volt. I think the Gen 2 Volt will make it all the way there all electric, but then I expect I'd still only get 26 miles of charge while at work (same 120v outlet scenario), so I'll still probably burn that 1/4 gallon. Still I go from burning about 4 gallons/week to 1 gallon/week. For simplicity, let's say gas is $4/gal. In a year that's 52 gal/$208 rather than 208 gal/$832. I save over $600/year...likely more with evening/weekend driving.

We are blessed to have rooftop solar, so Volt or Model 3, home charging cost is negligible for me now. Any road-tripping, Tesla charges 0.26/kWh to charge, which may get you 3 miles, so about 0.09 cents/mile. Gen 2 Volt at $4/gal goes about 40+ miles, so say 0.10 cents/mile. Leaving the environmental arguments aside, not much difference in cost and folks have argued you should consider the time savings -- gas fueling is still way faster let's be honest. SuperChargers also sometimes have a line (OK gas stations do sometimes too, but less often in my experience)...and you don't always get the fastest SuperCharging rate - it's common knowledge if sharing a SuperCharger you may only get a rate in the 70's kW rather than the ideal 120kW. Also, with SuperChargers that last 20% or so of charging slows way down to protect the battery, so when you get to about 250 mile range you're usually better off time-wise just stopping at that point. Also with any EV you need to give yourself at least 10% buffer on the lower so as not to get stranded, so you'll want to keep your Model 3 range between about 30 miles and 250 miles range, so really only driving 220. Also driving highway speeds will burn battery range faster, as will cold weather, etc. So Model 3 you'll want to stop at least every 200-250 miles or so. For non-Telsa EV chargers, I seem to always see 0.50 to $1.00 per kW - total rip off. Gassing up my Volt is way cheaper!
Say Model 3 saves me $300/year in fuel costs to be super-generous...but it's $15k more to buy. Hmmm, I break even in 50 years(?) Wow!

Safety.
Both have 5 star ratings. Maybe no significance overall, but I noticed Gen 2 Volt has 10 airbags, Model 3 actually only has 8. Gen 2 Volt Premium seems to have overall about the same level of safety features as Model 3 (without $5k autopilot). Actually Volt "Adaptive Cruise Control" isn't much different from autopilot...you have to steer, but hands supposed to be on the wheel for both anyway; and autopilot can change lanes for you. Both make bumper-to-bumper traffic much less annoying.

Insurance.
I compared insurance costs on USAA. Almost exactly the same - both super-cheap...actually both LESS than my 2012 Volt!

Other specs seem pretty close.

PS --
Not sure it's worth buying used, but you get even better numbers with used 2016 Volt Premium. No tax rebate, but can be easily found for $23,000. So now you're paying over $18k more for a Model 3. Not too many used Model 3's yet.
BMW i3 REx also seems it'd fit my commute pretty well and used 72 mile battery range seem to start around $15k, but Volt's handle road-trips with no compromises. BMW i3 seem to have unique challenges outside ~150 mile trip. Probably not worth the hassle to me.
 

garsh

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#2
Wow, that's a lot of text.

There are several answers, all depending on the individual.
  • Why does anybody buy a BMW/Mercedes/Cadillac/Audi/Lexus/Genesis when they could pay less for a Chevy/Ford/Hyundai/Honda/Toyota? Some people like the premium brands, and the extra features they provide.
  • Autopilot, and Full-Self-Driving in the (hopefully near) future. Nobody else is offering that.
  • Cars that get updated throughout their lifetime
  • That Volt can't do 0-60mph in 3.5s
  • Model 3 is sexy. Volt is just another economy car.
  • I don't ever want to buy another car with a combustion engine. I don't want to deal with oil changes, and emissions testing, and a complicated transmission, etc.

If all you want is a commuter car that allows you to save money, then get a used Leaf. They're very cheap, and are fun little cars to drive. If the car needs to be able to go on some longer trips, then the Volt is a good choice.
 

Lovesword

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#3
OMG TESLA SHORT!!!! GET EM!!! ;)

A well written, detailed post, for certain. I don't imagine you'll get burned at the stake here at M3OC... but get your flame suit just in case!

Speaking only for myself, I see nothing appealing about the Volt. I don't like the way it looks at all. I don't like the cars the company puts out and I don't like the car company: I dislike that they were bailed out by us (U.S. taxpayers).

Also, I've eliminated gasoline entirely from our household and want to never have to deal with it again. So there is that. Sure it's better for the environment, but more importantly to me, it's better for my own health which is something I'm becoming more aware of as I age. Just a few drips of gas here or there? A smell of it once a week while prepping to mow the lawn? Harmless? Maybe or maybe not, but I've eliminated that variable all together so there isn't a chance.
 

justflie

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#4
Part of it is a “want,” for sure. I have a 2012 Volt also, which I have thoroughly enjoyed, but which I only purchased as a bridge vehicle to eventually go full electric. I test drove the leaf in late 2011 and it just didn’t do it for me. Not enough range, too small, etc. The Volt was the best of both worlds for me at the time; enough electric range for my daily commute and then some, plus the ICE for longer trips. Some/many of the people here believe Tesla and EV driving are the future and want to support that vision with their wallets. The Volt is only a half-measure to that end.

Now that the Model 3 has arrived, I’m able to reasonably afford a fully electric vehicle. For me, there’s a stark difference in driving enjoyment in my Volt in EV mode Vs. ICE. And Garsh nailed it with his post for many of the reasons, especially that first one. This demographic is less price sensitive than most and is willing to spend more money on luxury, performance, etc. If price were weighted highest in our calculations, likely none of us would be doling out $50k+ for something with 4 wheels and a steering wheel just like any other car.

And +5 points for autopilot, every time I’m in traffic, especially to Cape Cod, I remind myself! “Only a few more months til my dual motor...”

Edit: and you have a model x so your price sensitivity is likely different than most, as well. But we all have our lines which is the reason for your post. You can’t see spending the money on the 3 compared to the Volt. I can’t understand spending the extra for Performance but there are people who highly value the extras they get there. To each his own.
 

KarenRei

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#5
First off,

1) Welcome :)

2) I think your numbers are misleading based on you focusing on "what you could get at this moment right now", when nobody can just walk down to a "Tesla Dealership" today like they can with a Volt and walk off with a Model 3. Your comparison requires the Model 3 being constrained to versions available *today* which people can't just walk off the street and buy. Push the comparison off 9-12 months or so to when there's no longer a waiting list, to when the "man on the street" can actually choose between a Volt or a Model 3 without a huge waiting list, and the comparison will be very different. Neither will likely have the tax credit, and lower cost Model 3 variants will be available.

3) You're writing off things that people are well known to pay large premiums for, like performance, as if they're nothing, just because you don't care. But the general public distinctly does, that's why they pay so much for it. A 7,5s 0-60 and a 5,1s 0-60 (often measuring in several tenths faster than that) aren't even in the same ballpark. You're tacking on $5k of PUP onto the Model 3 with hardly a second thought, ignoring that most of what it provides doesn't have an equivalent in Volt. Let alone all of the things that come standard in Model 3 that don't have an equivalent in Volt, but that's a whole new can of worms.

If you write off performance and luxury features, you might as well write "I don't understand why anyone would buy a BMW when they could buy a Honda Civic"

4) You write off all issues of range simply because you drive so little outside of the Volt's limited range. Well, great for you. You write off all other comparisons of countries where tax credits / structures are different for different vehicles because you live in the US. Well, great for you. You haphazardly mention oil changes and gas fillups like we're not supposed to have to care about ICE engine hassles like that. Great for you if you happen not to. But do understand that you aren't everyone. :)

5) That said, even for you, here's some graphs you should really pay attention to:





Obviously, we don't have data for the Model 3 yet, but if it's anything like Tesla's other models - and I see no reason why it won't be - its depreciation rate will crush the Volt's. And that is a huge financial difference there.

Then this gem at the end:

Not sure it's worth buying used, but you get even better numbers with used 2016 Volt Premium.
Now you're comparing the price of a used car with the price of a different, new car in order to favour your preferred car? Come on now, at least try to be serious here. Do we really also need to explain the reason why people pay more for new cars than used ones?


Oh, and one more minor point: Model 3 is 241 Wh/mi EPA, Volt is 265 Wh/mi. And the Tesla was deliberately downrated to that by Tesla from the measured values; it actually measured in at 224. We could also talk about available options, too. Want autopilot? Volt isn't an option to you at all. Want AWD? Volt isn't an option to you at all. Want a real performance package? Volt isn't an option for you at all. Etc, etc.
 
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MelindaV

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For me, it comes down to:
Why would I buy a hybrid if I wanted an EV?
Why would I purchase from GM when I could purchase from Tesla?
Why would I drive a boring ho-hum car when I could drive a tesla?

Disclaimer: I did not feel the need to read thru a page long bash so stopped after the first paragraph
 

Dr. J

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My answer is: different strokes for different folks. I probably can't talk you off that ledge, and since you already own a Model X, I don't see why it's even necessary. Good luck!
 

Ken Voss

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If your ONLY criteria is the cheapest car that is economical I would not recommend a Model 3. Take a look at a used Prius, you can pick up a low mileage 2014 or 2015 for under $15,000 and get 50MPG...

Now I would not compare that car with a Model 3 in ANY way but it gets great gas mileage and is cheep if that is all you are looking for go for it!
 
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Ed Woodrick

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I think that you are probably comparing to the wrong thing. It is pretty obvious that the features of the Model 3 aren't advantageous to you. There's no problem with that. Some people have different lifestyle and different desires. Some people buy used cars, some people buy new.

Actually the Volt really isn't in the same marketplace as the fully electrics. And there are a tone of cars in the hybrid space now.

What I think that you should be comparing the Volt to is the 2018 Leaf. With the current 160+ mile range, that would handle your daily requirements with ease and can even come with the same self-driving capabilities in the Model 3 today. It's a great car, overshadowed by the Model 3, but a fully electric with some pretty impressive features. The base model, with tax credit is under $23k, so it can even beat the Volt.

BTW, just looking at Chevy's site, the Volt pricing seems to be a lot more than what you show.
 

PNWmisty

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Not sure it's worth buying used, but you get even better numbers with used 2016 Volt Premium. No tax rebate, but can be easily found for $23,000. So now you're paying over $18k more for a Model 3.
True, from a pure dollars and cents perspective, you are financially ahead keeping your Volt (or buying a used Volt). If we all bought cars based purely on how much it cost to get from A to B, we would all be in 10 year old cars with small gas engines. But most people want to upgrade to something nicer.

In the case of the Model 3, it's a lot nicer! If you can afford it, it's a great value.
 

GDN

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Wow - I didn't read past the first line or two, so good deal to all of you that did and have responded to OP, but why no Volt or Bolt - lets just be real - wouldn't be caught dead driving those ugly things. I know a lot of my fellow members have driven those cars and I don't truly mean to offend you, but I figure most of you bought those cars to be green and conserve and maybe save the planet, but I have a real hard time thinking anyone truly went down and bought one of those cars solely on looks. It's about looks, tastes, power, pure raw s3xy.
 

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I started down the path of electrified transportation back in 2004 with a Prius...yes, electrified even in a Prius, for a very short distance and at a very slow speed. I then moved to a 2014 Volt, it actually had all electric range (about 38 miles the way I drive) and was not limited by speed on electric propulsion. I can say that the Volt was the vehicle that got me wanting more and more all electric range but I now wanted to get out of buying gas (and all the maintenance that goes with ICE) altogether and so it became a bridge vehicle and I was ready to go full electric.

As others have mentioned, besides being fully electrified and sustainable, an EV's look and design play a big part in the purchasing decision because buying a car is such an emotional purchase; I would venture to say that even a good looking pickup truck appeals to our emotions. Yes, beauty is subjective but there is something timeless about great designs vs. designs that exude ugliness (ex: the Pontiac Aztek). Sure, I could have gone with a Leaf or even the i3 that I had a short term lease on and I am no expert on car designs, but I just knew I could not live long-term with both these vehicles that do not appeal to my sense of beauty in design and functionality (long range).

If you are looking to buy a vehicle on purely economic reasons, then these cars (Volts, Leaf, Model 3, etc...) may not make sense. You might as well as get a Civic, Corolla, etc...
 

Fishn4life

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#17
I just took delivery of my 3 so take this for what it’s worth.

We have had the Chevy Bolt (B not V) for last 8 months. We love it. It’s not luxurious by any means but it is a nice car and serves it’s purpose. I commute approx 60 miles and it allows for free carpool and fast track (which is approx $20 each way here in so cal). It also has a great range (60 KW battery).

My wife wanted to keep the Bolt for her car so now we have 2 EVs. I think both cars are great but honestly it’s like comparing flying 1st class to coach. Both seats will get you from A to B but the comfort level is night/day. Also, the technology is amazing with the Tesla. It’s a completely different class.

It really comes down to what you value the difference at. Would you buy a 1st class ticket and fly first class on a regular basis if it cost 1/3 more? For me, both cars are great but the model 3 is a no brainer for the difference in price.
 
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#18
Some people like the premium brands
Would you buy a 1st class ticket and fly first class on a regular basis if it cost 1/3 more?
Uh, no. I might pay $5 more. $10 even.

This demographic is less price sensitive than most and is willing to spend more money on luxury, performance, etc.
Exactly. This sort of "Freakonomics" stuff fascinates me - I love learning how other folks view these sorts of decisions and make the choices they do. For me the security and freedom that a fat nest egg buys me is definitely more important than creature comforts. And I'm not quite there yet -- you know, retirement $$, 529's, and all the rest. I've been working hard to get there for decades...painful to me whenever something slows me down towards that goal. But I really like hearing how the other side views these things. Kind of like listening to a die hard Trump supporter -- don't quite get it completely, but like to try to understand.

Clearly $15k is worth more to me than many Tesla owners. But, if $15k is worth less to someone else, I'd assume their time is worth more to them. So maybe it's better to try to frame it as the time value of money. For me $15k probably means about 150 hours of extra work outside my regular full time job. Would it be worth it to you to spend 150 hours of time working, away from family and enjoyable pastimes to buy a Model 3 instead of (whatever other cheaper EV or hybrid)?....and why?

emissions testing
Ah, I have to get a smog check on my Volt this week actually.

I do hate these too, and avoiding them would add value to my life, but I bought my used '12 Volt 3 years ago and have only had to change the oil once...had a coupon so only cost $12.95. I still have over 90% oil life remaining.

I've eliminated gasoline entirely from our household
I do see the appeal.

I dislike that they were bailed out by us (U.S. taxpayers).
I thought it was a loan they paid back early with interest? Didn't Tesla have a similar DOE loan that they paid back? Just sayin'. That was a tough time - I know I got burned on the house we'd bought in 2005.

Karen,
Thank you. You read me pretty well - I'm sure my tree hugger profile scores quite high, but my practicality/financial prudence is also quite strong. So I ruminate over the cost/benefit numbers for consumer purchases and the time value of money. Love your depreciation graphs for comparison. You made me realize this:
If Model 3 depreciation mirrors that of Model S (which I think's a reasonable assumption), then a $50k Model 3 would still be worth $25k (approx 50% "residual") at 100k miles. The $33k Volt would only be worth about $12k. That's nearly the $15k price difference that I'm whining about in the first place. Something to really think about.

I think your numbers are misleading based on you focusing on "what you could get at this moment right now"
I guess you mean because Model 3's at $35k will be available in the coming months. So maybe $35k Model 3 vs Premium Volt might be a better comparison-hmmm. In my case the $49k long-range, premium Model 3 would be $41,500 as I think I still have time to snag the federal tax credit. $35k Model 3 I suspect won't offer much credit. I do kinda think the extra range and faux leather seats are probably worth another $6,500.

"I don't understand why anyone would buy a BMW when they could buy a Honda Civic"
Yeah, that's kinda how my brain works. I think I've asked that exact question once!

in Teslas it's one in every 320 million miles, vs. the US average of 1 in 86 million miles.
This article points out that Tesla's "1 in 86 million" fatality rate average figure is misleading.
The central problem with the 86m figure is that it refers to the average vehicle on the road. Some drivers are drunk or texting. The average car is 11 years old, when newer cars are linked to deaths at far lower rates for various reasons.

I'm not quite sure apples-to-apples but may be very close, but I did find this IIHS data: http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/driver-death-rates
It notes Volt's one of the safest cars in its class at 7 fatal accidents in ~140,000 registered vehicle years -- better than most and nearly in the realm of the Mercedes & BMWs listed. I guess you could estimate folks drive around 12,000 miles per year, so that's 7 deaths in 1.68 billion miles(?)...so 1 in 240 million(?).
Unfortunately Tesla isn't listed.

And this article takes the IIHS numbers to estimate the average for modern cars is actually
one driver fatality for every 428 million miles driven.

Could it be you're subconsciously trying to convince yourself not to lust for a Model 3 and are hoping for some kind of affirmation here?
It could, kinda. I mean, I know I'd like Model 3 more overall than the Volt, but it doesn't feel like $15k 150 hours?) more to me. Or it's like $30k more than just keeping my '12 Volt. Affirmation would be helpful ;)

And thanks to everyone for the Leaf, Bolt, other hybrid suggestions. I do want to be as electric as possible, so really don't want to even consider Prius. I have considered the other EV's but the only ones that could reliably make my longer work commute (130 miles total) are Bolt, newest Leaf, possibly used/new i3 REx, new/used Volt, and Model 3. However, for me the freedom to drive a couple hundred miles spur of the moment with minimal hassle is actually worth a few more thousand $$. Also, I almost bought a used Leaf when shopping my used '12 Volt. Volt cost was about $2k more back then as I recall, but my wife pointed out I'll forget to charge it some day and really regret it. She was right -- I've forgotten my charge cable, forgotten to plug in entirely, couldn't plug in at all, had breakers trip on me, etc. In Volt I just sigh, shrug my shoulders, and burn a little gas. Most of our road trips are family in the X, but sometimes I have to road trip solo up to 500 miles for work or 250 miles for our rental a couple of counties away. Renting would be extra expense/time/hassle not worth it to me (even to cheap guy), so that narrows my choices down to Volt or Tesla.

I may be best off waiting. Great because less effort now :) Also, the flip side of Karen's depreciation data is that if could wait 3-4 years, I maybe could buy a used long range 3 with 100k miles for maybe $20k or so(?) If repair/maintenance/endurance data looks as favorable as I think it will, well that's a purchase I could see feeling comfortable with. Then we could compare used 3 vs new/used Volt. Now THAT will be interesting.
 
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#19
Previous owner of a 2016 Volt here, recently sold in preparation for Model 3. I agree with the points you listed. Heck at one point I was even thinking of trading in my Volt and lease Kia Soul EV (lease was under 6k for 3 years) as my wife has one. In city driving any EV will do because of the instant torque from 0-30.

I've come to a conclusion that life is too short and I rather not have to wait later in life to drive something I actually want. It's probably one of the worse financial mistakes but when is buying a new car a good financial decision?

But to justify the cost of the purchase I'll list them:
1) The rear seats has more headroom and doesn't feel as cramped when compared to the Volt
2) My child will be able to see more of the outside during his times in the car
3) Sometimes the Volt's A/C has this weird smell when first turned on but then goes away after a bit. Also the heat for the foot well is poor in the winter. (Not a big issue but a downside to me)
4) I dislike driving long distances and I know EAP (Convenience feature) would help alleviate most of the stress of long distance driving.
5) Standard safety features (Not EAP) included with the vehicle by default. The Volt does not have these unless you go with a premier trim and even then it doesn't do what a Tesla can do. There have been videos of Model 3 owners almost getting side swiped from other vehicles drifting to their lane and the car would auto-steer the vehicle to avoid collision.

The price difference I'm paying for is the everyday experience driving an awesome car (similar to how you would go to the Movies or on a Vacation trip somewhere) and the safety features. I'm also betting on software improvements\features on the car that will basically give you something new for your car every few months or so.
 

SoFlaModel3

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#20
For me this simple — I will never pump gas again.

Now to speak to the car itself specifically. I have no experience with the Volt, but I can specifically say I typically do not like the American brands at all. I have always thought they felt cheap even if they looked nice from a distance (again can’t specifically speak to the Volt so that’s just my perception of Chevy).

Funny that I end up with the most American car ever, but everything about it feels premium like a German car.

I like premium things and will pay a premium to get them!