Charging best practices when street parking

  • SUPPORT THE SITE AND ENJOY A PREMIUM EXPERIENCE!
    Welcome to Tesla Owners Online, four years young! For a low subscription fee, you will receive access to an ad-free version of TOO. We now offer yearly memberships! You can subscribe via this direct link:
    https://teslaownersonline.com/account/upgrades

    SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL!
    Did you know we have a YouTube channel that's all about Tesla? Lots of Tesla information, fun, vlogs, product reviews, and a weekly Tesla Owners Online Podcast as well!

Joined
Jul 10, 2018
Messages
8
Location
Berkeley, CA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#1
Hi all,

Just got my Model 3, and this is only my second post to the Forum. Please forgive me if this question is redundant but…

At my house I don't have a garage, driveway or carport, so I'm forced to park my M3 on the street by my house. Fortunately the closest parking space is always available and I can park the car very close to the Tesla Wall Charger I installed on my exterior wall.

I work from home and do not drive a great deal. Some days I might drive 30 miles, others I might not drive at all (but in a week I probably drive 150-200 miles). I have gotten into the habit of charging the car every other night - even sometimes skipping two nights. I've been charging up to 90% (My Tesla Delivery Advisor (TDA) told me to charge to 90% and never go below 10%).

I wanted to ask the group if this practice was advisable (skipping days), or if I should be charging more (or less) regularly (even if the car may have only been used for short drives). I want to keep my batteries as healthy as I can. I've also read and seen videos that recommend only charging to 80% and never going below 20%. I mentioned this to my TDA, but he said go 90/10.

In other news, I've noticed that the Energy Bar on my display regularly has dots on the far left hand side of the bar. They are usually there in the morning, but they tend to last throughout the day. I know this means regenerative braking may be reduced due to capacity or weather, but I'm in Northern California and the temperatures are very mild. And the dots don't disappear later in the day (after everything has warmed up and I've driven a bit). That said, regenerative braking seems to be working fine despite the dots. The dots! They are freaking me out : )

Anyway, thanks for any advice/insights/best practices. I appreciate your responses.

Best
Greg
 

ADK46

Top-Contributor
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
532
Location
Adirondacks, NY
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#2
Your TDA is not a battery engineer, so I'd go with the more accepted 80% limit. It's not a hard limit, that 80% is good and 90% is bad. It's safe to say that 80% is better, though perhaps only a little.

Plugging in every day is more of a "why not?" thing when it's easy (or when expecting an update?). It's also a way to discourage the practice of running a battery down low before recharging, as if it were a gas tank.
 

garsh

Dis Member
Moderator
TOO Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2016
Messages
13,470
Location
Pittsburgh PA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#3
I also suggest only charging to 80% in your situation. That should give you full regen at all times, and it sounds like you don't need the extra range of a 90% charge at all. You can always charge more when you're planning a long trip.
 
Last edited:

kort677

Top-Contributor
Joined
Sep 17, 2018
Messages
442
Location
Ponte Vedra Beach FLA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#4
Your TDA is not a battery engineer, so I'd go with the more accepted 80% limit. It's not a hard limit, that 80% is good and 90% is bad. It's safe to say that 80% is better, though perhaps only a little.

Plugging in every day is more of a "why not?" thing when it's easy (or when expecting an update?). It's also a way to discourage the practice of running a battery down low before recharging, as if it were a gas tank.
I don't know where you got your data from, for years the rule of thumb is up 90% for "normal" usage and down to 10%. these numbers can be exceeded as necessary for example if heading out on a long trip or in the middle of a long road trip it is ok to charge up to 100% and let the car dip below 10%, the key is to not allow the car to remain at those extreme levels for a long amount of time, charge to 100% but get driving and get below 10% but charge it up ASAP.
 

ADK46

Top-Contributor
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
532
Location
Adirondacks, NY
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#5
I don't know where you got your data from, for years the rule of thumb is up 90% for "normal" usage and down to 10%. these numbers can be exceeded as necessary for example if heading out on a long trip or in the middle of a long road trip it is ok to charge up to 100% and let the car dip below 10%, the key is to not allow the car to remain at those extreme levels for a long amount of time, charge to 100% but get driving and get below 10% but charge it up ASAP.
I'm not sure where I got 80% either - by slow absorption from a great deal of reading. I just googled a bit and found this, which includes Elon tweeting (oh no!) 80%. As I mentioned, there's no hard limit - imagine a curve of degradation versus charge limit.

https://electrek.co/2017/09/01/tesla-battery-expert-recommends-daily-battery-pack-charging/
 

Ed Woodrick

Top-Contributor
Joined
May 25, 2018
Messages
886
Location
Atlanta, GA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#6
I don't charge every day and I don't expect it to have any impact on the car. I did this with my 2018 Leaf and it had only a few percent drop in SOC over 4 years. With only 30 miles, drop the max down to 80% just to relieve the batteries a little.

I would be worried about the cord. If it crosses a sidewalk or if people walk over it, you've got an opportunity for someone to trip. Make sure that you secure and mark the cord appropriately.
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2018
Messages
8
Location
Berkeley, CA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#7
I don't charge every day and I don't expect it to have any impact on the car. I did this with my 2018 Leaf and it had only a few percent drop in SOC over 4 years. With only 30 miles, drop the max down to 80% just to relieve the batteries a little.

I would be worried about the cord. If it crosses a sidewalk or if people walk over it, you've got an opportunity for someone to trip. Make sure that you secure and mark the cord appropriately.
I actually bought two ADA Cable Crossover Protector Ramps. I run the cable through the middle and only charge at night. I also put a reflective traffic cone out. There is a street lamp that's always on which provided decent illumination. Running the cable over the sidewalk is not ideal, but I hope I'm taking the best possible precautions for trip hazards.
 

PNWmisty

Legendary Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
2,541
Location
Anacortes, WA
Country
Country
#8
I would charge to 80% since you obviously don't need the range. The cells have a lower voltage at 80% and this reduces the very slow and gradual degradation that happens at higher cell voltages. I would also plug in whenever you are not driving the car. It won't be charging once the car has hit its charge limit but any vampire drain will come straight out of the wall as the electricity is used rather than eventually needing to go through the charger (probably only around 80% efficient on 120V power) and then into the batteries. So your electrical bill will be lower if you keep it plugged in. Keeping it plugged in at all times also reduces the cycling of the batteries and extends their life.

That's why Tesla engineers say "A plugged-in Tesla is a happy Tesla".
 

Madmolecule

Top-Contributor
Green Level Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2018
Messages
401
Location
Duluth, GA
Country
Country
Tesla Owner
Model 3
#10
It looks like charging to 90% every night now recommended by Tesla to minimize battery range degradation