Car started resetting itself repeatedly the other night, but fixed itself

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ADK46

Top-Contributor
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
532
Location
Adirondacks, NY
Tesla Owner
Model 3
Country
Country
#1
I went into the garage night before last with my wife's iPhone 6S to set it up as a key (2nd key). Just before, I plugged the car into the Wall Connector. Naturally, the car was doing it's normal clunking, clicking and whirring around this time. My wife reported more noises later, around the time charging was complete. Normal, I thought. I increased the charge limit on her phone as a test. More noises - normal, I thought.

But in the morning, I finally realized the car was cycling through the same set of noises, at around a two-minute period. Our phones are usually directly upstairs - ten feet above - so I moved them out of bluetooth range. No change. Throughout this period, the phone app seemed to communicate with the car normally.

To try to make it stop, I unplugged the car, noticing only at that point that the charge port light had been cycling off and on in sync with the noises. Seemed like a fairly hard reset was occurring, over and over.

Got in the car using the key card, started it up, and got a bunch of warning lights - airbag, ABS, traction control, and others. Incautiously, I headed down the driveway anyway. When I stopped, the warning lights went out. The car has been behaving normally since.

So: 1) It appears I must get to used to the idea that this computer-laden car will suffer computer-like faults; my usual computer practice of avoiding unusual sequences might be wise (in this case, setting up a phone while a plug-inserted event is being handled); coders do not account for every odd thing a user might do. And 2), I should promptly investigate noises reported by my spouse.