Body rust warranty: 12 years, unlimited miles

barjohn

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#41
Just found this exploded view of the various structural materials: https://www.docdroid.net/qSVezD9/model3-body.pdf and as long as the use of aluminum is as minimal a shown and the areas where they join are properly isolated it shouldn't be a problem. Not to say the use of so much steel couldn't be a rust problem but that is a different issue and assuming they employ proper galvanizing it should be manageable.
 
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Vin

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#42
Thanks for providing your point of view and the link.

One question I have that maybe you or someone might answer is does any paint protector or coating like Xpel or Opticoat/Cquartz help at all against rust, at least on areas applied or at least for the 3-5 years it is on the car?
Not that it would be the overall solution, but I am getting paint coating/film anyway, so I was just curious if it helps in any way for rust issues due to their hydro repulsion quality.
Thanks.
 
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rxlawdude

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#43
Just found this exploded view of the various structural materials: https://www.docdroid.net/qSVezD9/model3-body.pdf and as long as the use of aluminum is as minimal a shown and the areas where they join are properly isolated it shouldn't be a problem. Not to say the use of so much steel couldn't be a rust problem but that is a different issue and assuming they employ proper galvanizing it should be manageable.
And my point was that rather than speculate that there might be a problem in theory, having the facts first that show in fact it is not a problem is preferable.
 

Robert Pickel

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#44
I've run across a couple of videos lately demonstrating (with a magnet) how much of the exterior body of the Model 3 is actually steel and not aluminum. The Models S & X are said to be all aluminum (non-corrosive) exteriors. So, those of us in cold climates will have to consider the degradation of road salt on our new Model 3s. Is this a "game changer" for anyone? What options do we have?
 

Spinball

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#45
To a fellow northerner like me, it's a more a question of what's the alternative? Spend nearly twice as much on a Model S? 99% of cars have steel bodies so it's not like there are many other options out there. At least the Model 3 is partially aluminum.

I happen to be driving a BMW i3 right now and though I don't plan to keep it long enough for it to matter, I love that the CFRP frame and plastic body panels sure are completely impervious to rust! Even aluminum can corrode. It's going to be odd to see an i3 20 years from now because it will probably still look like new. In my experience you don't even have to worry about door dings.
 

Archaebald

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#48
I'm not too worried about this. It is definitely not a deal breaker. My Ford S-Max (mostly steel) is still going strong, with no corrosion whatsoever on the exterior body after 9 years on northern roads and I don't expect my M3 to be any worse (at least I hope so...). Admittedly, we have less salt on the roads than in the southern parts, where people fight snow and ice by any means (i.e., salt) instead of complying with the terms of nature (and physics).
 

scaots

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#49
I live in the mid-Atlantic and the roads I regularly drive are heavily treated in winter weather which is regular for three months of the year. When it dries up I try to wash it good including getting anything off the underside and I have zero signs of rust on a 9 year old Saturn (aka nothing special), even when I look around underneath and in the engine compartment, so not too worried about it. Worst case you get rid of it before any issues which should be ok since they have a better resale than any other car.
 

TheTony

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#50
I wouldn't assume rust/corrosion won't happen simply because other more common/less expensive cars anecdotally do not usually experience rust. It's ironic that Saturn was mentioned, because GM is notorious on some of their vehicles, including passenger cars, for their rocker panels rusting from the inside out. There's models of some cars where you can identify the problem area because any one over X number of years old is rusting at the same spot. That suggests a design and/or manufacturing defect that was never caught and corrected. It won't show up right away, and by the time you notice it, it's too late.

I'm not saying we're likely to see this on the 3, but I would not simply assume there is no risk here. It's something where we'll have to wait and see, and hope there were no oversights that lead to this, as I hope to own the 3 long term.
 
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TheTony

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#52
Modern car bodies are dipped in an anti-corrosion bath before paint is applied. Steel or aluminum, there should be no issues.
I currently drive a vehicle that has developed rust on both quarter panels. E-coat has been around for over 25 years, so I'd assume mine does not predate this practice. The e-coat process does not guarantee that there is no chance of rust. That said, I fully acknowledge that in the last few years the quality of this process and best practices related to application may very well have improved. I fully expect to have no issues with the 3, but I'm aware that corrosion is a possibility with any vehicle with a metal body (whether rust or otherwise).
 
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#54
We’ve known since the reveal that the car was going to be a mix of aluminum and steel. What really bothers me is this video that states that the car appears to not be sealed and will therefore rust/corrode!

The video mentions lack of sealants, foam, oil, etc in the frunk & trunk areas, making corrosion a valid concern. Does anyone have closeup shots to confirm this?
 

KarenRei

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#55
Model S and X also include significant amounts of steel. The "Model 3 is steel, Model X and S are alumium" is mostly marketing. See, for example, this, page 18, compared to this, page 20. Is Model 3 a higher percentage steel? Yes. But it's not some radical change.

UHS steel has a significantly better strength to weight ratio than even high alloy high temper alumium, and is much more forgiving. High-temper alumium is brittle.

And while alumium won't rust, it can corrode badly in certain circumstances. The circumstances that promote corrosion or rust in metals (and the steps to avoid them) are different between materials, but let it suffice to say, you can screw up with either.

Also, it's worth noting that properly protected steel can last longer than alumium. Again, it depends on the circumstances. I have a 2000 Honda Insight which leaks and which I had to (multiple times) patch up. Why? Because - as was discovered this past year, but has apparently existed for longer - there's cracks running down the entire length of the roof on both sides. Alumium fatigues. Not just faster than steel, but also - unlike steel - will fatigue from even minor flexing, just at a lower rate (steel has a limit, below which it does not fatigue at all)

[moderator edit - fixed PDF links to open directly to the noted pages]
 
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Jongaud

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#56
I'm not sure I get it.

According to this:
https://www.tesla.com/sites/default/files/downloads/Model_3_New_Vehicle_Limited_Warranty_NA_en.pdf

"this New Vehicle Limited Warranty does NOT cover:
- Any corrosion or paint defects including, but not limited to, the following:
• Corrosion from defects in non-Tesla manufactured or supplied materials or workmanship causing perforation (holes) in body panels or the chassis from the inside out;
• Surface or cosmetic corrosion causing perforation in body panels or the chassis from the outside in, such as stone chips or scratches;
• Corrosion and paint defects caused by, due to, or resulting from accidents, paint matching, abuse, neglect, improper maintenance or operation of the vehicle, installation of an accessory, exposure to chemical substances, or damages resulting from an act of God or nature, fire, or improper storage; "

Said otherwise, the warranty does not include corrosion situations listed in the bullet points... "but not limited to" this list? Basically they will decide on the fly what is covered or not?
 

Mike

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#57
Basically they will decide on the fly what is covered or not?
Not being trained in the legal profession, but having done years of planning/staff work when I was in the RCAF and also included the "to include but not be limited to" clause.....

It's to prevent someone with a situation well outside of expected norms from pulling a fast one and trying to claim it because it was not EXPLICITLY stated.

That's why you see the "acts of God" in there as well.
 

Mike

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#59
Unfortunately, I was right. According to the CAA (like AAA but in Canada), « Tesla is the only one manufacturer not to include any corrosion coverage » in its warranty:

https://www.caaquebec.com/fr/actual...aa-quebec-sur-les-garanties-automobiles-2017/

☹️
Is that the legal opinion of their in house council?

I would beg to differ from your conclusion .

The vehicle comes with a warrenty against manufacturer defects for four years or 80,000 kms.

The listed exclusions all deal with corrosion as a result of:
  • using non OEM body panels and parts for repairs,
  • using non OEM procedures to implement those repairs,
  • allowing stone chips to fester to the point a hole forms in the sheet metal (it will take much longer than four years for a stone chip in the chassis to fester to the point that said chassis part becomes unreliable), and
  • the cover everything else clause that is essentially telling you to get repairs done right and don't abuse it.
Of course, I'm not trained as a lawyer and you could be correct that Teslas do not have any corrosion warrenty whatsoever.

If that's the case, perhaps you should rethink your car purchase plans ;)
 

Jongaud

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#60
CAA had the warranties of all manufacturers analyzed by experts.

Also another source:
https://www.edmunds.com/auto-warranty/warranty-and-roadside-assistance-coverage.html
In the column « corrosion », Tesla is the only one who has a « N/A »

And the text of Tesla is very clear. They say corrosion is not covered, and then they provide examples of corrosion situations not covered, saying the non coverage of corrosion is not limitd to those examples.



Is that the legal opinion of their in house council?

I would beg to differ from your conclusion .

The vehicle comes with a warrenty against manufacturer defects for four years or 80,000 kms.

The listed exclusions all deal with corrosion as a result of:
  • using non OEM body panels and parts for repairs,
  • using non OEM procedures to implement those repairs,
  • allowing stone chips to fester to the point a hole forms in the sheet metal (it will take much longer than four years for a stone chip in the chassis to fester to the point that said chassis part becomes unreliable), and
  • the cover everything else clause that is essentially telling you to get repairs done right and don't abuse it.
Of course, I'm not trained as a lawyer and you could be correct that Teslas do not have any corrosion warrenty whatsoever.

If that's the case, perhaps you should rethink your car purchase plans ;)
 
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