Battery Option??

SoFlaModel3

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#3
If I going for the basic battery model, do I have the option to upgrade later on? Just like the S over the air upgrade?
Given that the standard and long range battery cars have a substantive curb weight difference, I think that alone should confirm that the standard car is not using a software locked larger battery.

That means you buy the larger battery up front if you want it.
 

Reliev

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#4
I have a question about this is it really needed if the battery can go between supercharger a and b? I think I want the bigger battery but I am not seeing the point in some regard, for example, I work from home I never drive more than 80 miles a day typically most of the time its 3-4 miles, I do take maybe 4-6 road trips a year from what I have found on tesla ratios site I was able to theoretically get to all super chargers with no issues. So my question is beside peace of mind and a little faster charging is it worth it?
 

SoFlaModel3

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#7
I have a question about this is it really needed if the battery can go between supercharger a and b? I think I want the bigger battery but I am not seeing the point in some regard, for example, I work from home I never drive more than 80 miles a day typically most of the time its 3-4 miles, I do take maybe 4-6 road trips a year from what I have found on tesla ratios site I was able to theoretically get to all super chargers with no issues. So my question is beside peace of mind and a little faster charging is it worth it?
I generally have the same opinion as you. I think range anxiety is overrated, but it's the single biggest hurdle to overcome. The ICE companies will say their cars go 400-500 miles and gas stations are everywhere, so they're fast and convenient.

Of course with an EV, outside of road trips you will charge at home 99% of the time and never be inconvenienced with stopping at all nor touching a dirty gas pump.

It's an education process.

So that said, why am I opting for the larger battery then if I too only drive 75 miles daily and take just a few road trips a year.

You will set the battery to use 80% (or so) of the maximum capacity on a daily basis, so your 220 mile range becomes 176 miles. I'm not going to say I'm an aggressive driver, but well I have a lead right foot. My current car has an EPA rated range of ~28 MPG for the driving mix that I do and my average MPG trends in the 21-22 MPG range. So let's say I get 75% of the rated range for the sake of argument. Apply that to our remaining range of 176 miles and now I'm down to 132 miles. Now I'm really sniffing my daily commute of 75 miles. What if I go out to a sporting event, concert, downtown for a dinner -- now I'm stressing and life with an EV is not as simple. Battery degradation isn't bad on a Tesla, but even slipping a little bit would just add to my nerves.

So for all of those reasons and better performance, resale, and quicker access to the car -- I will go with the long range vehicle!
 
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Reliev

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#8
I'm tending to lean that way also. I agree with most of your points I also have a feeling I will be driving this far more as it's cheaper to operate it's also becoming the most expensive car I've ever bought maybe I Uber occasionally for extra money. But good point on the EPA numbers my car is supposed to get 24/29 I typically get 21 but also most of my driving is around town.
 

garsh

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#10
Doesn't a larger battery degrade less than a smaller battery due to the fact that you have more cells to spread the degregation over?
In the sense that you don't have to charge it to 100% as often, and you don't deplete it as far. Lithium Ion cells generally like to be at 50% charge - keeping them close to that level helps keep degredation at bay.
 

sreams

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#11
Another way to put it... If you charged your battery to 90% every time, and you discharged to 10% every time, the LR battery would see far fewer charge cycles to go the same distance. The LR battery will last a lot longer than the SR battery if the same distance is driven with both of them.
 

SoFlaModel3

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#13
I get all of these points? But is the long range batter that gives me 80 more miles really worth $9,000?
For $9,000 you get ....

90 extra miles of range
Faster acceleration
Faster charging
More miles on the warranty
For those talking delivery this year quite possibly the difference of $3,750 in US Federal Tax Credit dollars

As a question of “worth” only each of us can answer that in our own personal situations. For me it was worth it to enjoy road trips, no worry about finding charging on a work day with evening plans, and not delaying taking delivery as well as losing out on a piece of the credit. The faster acceleration and charge speeds were more nice to have in my case.
 

LUXMAN

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#14
I get all of these points? But is the long range batter that gives me 80 more miles really worth $9,000?
I agree with all @SoFlaModel3 said above but also consider this...Tesla is warranting the Model 3 batteries for 70% capacity after 8 years. While I don’t think that will be a problem, not even close (like a Leaf) but 70% of 310 is 217.... That is basically the starting range of the SR battery...and 70% of 220 is 154 :eek:. Now subtract 10% for cold weather!
For me the LR is the car if you tend to keep vehicles for a long time
 
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#15
It is a bit agonizing because 9k price difference is quite big. I wish there would also be a 5k option for 270 miles. It would be even nicer if the upgraded sound system and leather seats would be a sepparate package, because I totally don't need them (I want the glass roof and driver profiles though).

I will get the bigger battery because my plan is to have the car for 10-15 years (I know, a risky plan, the technology will evolve quite a bit, but for me the current car is good enough).
 

Frank99

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#16
Given a choice, I would have gotten the SR battery. For roughly 98.7% of the miles I put on a car, it would have been fine. Once or twice a year I go on a longer trip - 350 miles each way or so. That's one supercharger stop for the LR battery, and two for the SR battery. I figured I could treat myself to a $1000 dinner each trip for 10 years to compensate for the extra half hour spent charging, and come out about even.
I didn't have a choice though. Tesla said "Time to configure" and I said "Right Now!", and SR wasn't an option.

If $9000 is a stretch, don't feel a bit bad about waiting for SR if, like me, a remarkably high percentage of your driving days are less than 150 miles.
 
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#17
Given a choice, I would have gotten the SR battery. For roughly 98.7% of the miles I put on a car, it would have been fine. Once or twice a year I go on a longer trip - 350 miles each way or so. That's one supercharger stop for the LR battery, and two for the SR battery. I figured I could treat myself to a $1000 dinner each trip for 10 years to compensate for the extra half hour spent charging, and come out about even.
I didn't have a choice though. Tesla said "Time to configure" and I said "Right Now!", and SR wasn't an option.

If $9000 is a stretch, don't feel a bit bad about waiting for SR if, like me, a remarkably high percentage of your driving days are less than 150 miles.
Thanks for the response. I drive 6 miles round trip per day to work......lol!!! However, I would like to take it on a road trip now and then that’s at least 200 miles each way.
 

Dogwhistle

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#19
I get all of these points? But is the long range batter that gives me 80 more miles really worth $9,000?
You’re in Tennessee, it can get cold there. 220 miles is not the practical range of the SR car. Subtract 10% each for top and bottom end buffer, and 40% for a good cold Appalachian winter, and that 220 is really more like 110. That extra 90 miles can make a big difference!
 

SoFlaModel3

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#20
You’re in Tennessee, it can get cold there. 220 miles is not the practical range of the SR car. Subtract 10% each for top and bottom end buffer, and 40% for a good cold Appalachian winter, and that 220 is really more like 110. That extra 90 miles can make a big difference!
But not if he’s going 6 miles :)