BATTERY & CHARGING (Quick Reference)

tencate

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#5
**RAIN OR SNOW CHARGING - Tesla vehicles are designed to charge in inclement weather including rain and snow.

So, I'm not sure this question belongs here but it seems as good a place as any---and I can't find any discussion of it elsewhere. Right now it's snowing like crazy again, mixed with sleet and some cold rain for added misery. The car is plugged in, outside, in the nasty weather, getting a nightly charge to top off before tomorrow. The area around the charge port on the car is not terribly well shielded, and it's wet around where the plug goes into the car.

I worried about this when an unexpected snowstorm covered the car while I was charging at a public charger a few weeks back as well. I brushed the snow off the car, stopped charging, released the plug and put it all away but all those volts/amps around all that "wet" potential bothers me a little. I'm sure Tesla has thought about this with their Supercharger network but what about the run-of-the-mill public chargers? Anyone have a good technical description of how the car protects itself and us owners from getting zapped in the wet? Mostly I'm just curious, I doubt anyone will get electrocuted plugging their car in the rain, think of the bad PR that would create...
 

JWardell

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#6
**RAIN OR SNOW CHARGING - Tesla vehicles are designed to charge in inclement weather including rain and snow.

So, I'm not sure this question belongs here but it seems as good a place as any---and I can't find any discussion of it elsewhere. Right now it's snowing like crazy again, mixed with sleet and some cold rain for added misery. The car is plugged in, outside, in the nasty weather, getting a nightly charge to top off before tomorrow. The area around the charge port on the car is not terribly well shielded, and it's wet around where the plug goes into the car.

I worried about this when an unexpected snowstorm covered the car while I was charging at a public charger a few weeks back as well. I brushed the snow off the car, stopped charging, released the plug and put it all away but all those volts/amps around all that "wet" potential bothers me a little. I'm sure Tesla has thought about this with their Supercharger network but what about the run-of-the-mill public chargers? Anyone have a good technical description of how the car protects itself and us owners from getting zapped in the wet? Mostly I'm just curious, I doubt anyone will get electrocuted plugging their car in the rain, think of the bad PR that would create...
Just like the GFCI outlets in your bathroom, if even the tiniest amount of electricity does not return through the other wire, they cut power. The car and charger can do one better and don't even enable power to flow unless everything checks out first. You should not have any worries at all of any EV being wet or covered in snow.
 

tencate

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#7
I had guessed that might be the case, glad to know. The outdoor home outlet I plug into for now (NEMA 5-20) is a GFCI outlet as well so no worries there either. Thanks.
 

garsh

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#8
I had guessed that might be the case, glad to know. The outdoor home outlet I plug into for now (NEMA 5-20) is a GFCI outlet as well so no worries there either. Thanks.
Well, sometimes having two GFCI devices on the same circuit causes issues, and one will end up causing the other to trip unnecessarily (The Mobile Connector has GFCI built-in, I believe - somebody correct me if I'm mistaken). Keep that in mind in case you notice your GFCI tripping a lot when you try to use it.