Autopilot Steering Wheel Sensor?

Dan Detweiler

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#1
So this falls more under curiosity than anything else. Just wondering...when autopilot is engaged are there "hotspots" on the steering wheel you have to touch to keep autopilot engaged (thinking maybe 10 and 2 o'clock?) or can you touch the wheel anywhere to keep it engaged? I wonder because I am one of those terrible drivers that tend to keep their hands on the bottom half of the wheel. Just wondering if I can just leave them there and not be worried about autopilot disengaging.

Thanks,

Dan
 
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4701

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#2
Terrible you are :) Hands should be kept at 9-3. 10-2 is extra "half-optimal" option some wheels have bumps for.
Thumbs can be around the wheel. Try out 9-3 - it's pretty easy to rest hands there. Wrap your thumbs.

There are no sensors inside the steering wheel.
There is a sensor that detects torque.
Even if you grab the wheel like mad but do not apply any torque, Tesla will not detect that.
Later on we can expect Tesla to look at the driver
 
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4701

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#4
Correct. It can be "turning the wheel when AP doesn't want to" or "not allowing it to turn when AP does the turning".
In both cases sensor can feel something.
Some self-steering vehicle torque sensors could be fooled with a weight strapped on the steering wheel.
But software can understand that (at least I think Tesla can) torque is constant all the time, therefore not human.

Actually, there might be no stand-alone sensor. All self-steering vehicles have electric motor that operates steering rack
and steering shaft position sensor (required for ESP). Using those two it is possible to detect human action.
 

stlgrym3

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#9
i've been using EAP for over a month now and really liked it. the only thing i'm kind of confused on is the hand on steering wheel thing when using EAP. is there a specific area of the steering wheel my hands supposed to hold on to? sometimes i can get by putting my hands on lower half of the steering wheel and apply pressure, but other times i had to move them to 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock position. how much pressure we supposed to apply? sometimes the warning disappear very quickly, other times i had to really squeeze the steering wheel hard to get rid of it. Today it turned off the auto-steer on me despite i tried all kinds of maneuvering with my hands on steering wheel. i know it's a safety concern on Tesla's part to place that warning feature in EAP, but it's kind of annoy due to the sensitivity of the steering wheel sensor.
 

BigBri

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#10
The wheel actually has no pressure sensors in it. The system is looking for a bit of downward torque on the wheel. I've found that if I rest my hand at 3 oclock it's enough force.
 

stlgrym3

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#11
The wheel actually has no pressure sensors in it. The system is looking for a bit of downward torque on the wheel. I've found that if I rest my hand at 3 oclock it's enough force.

So just one hand at 3 o’clock position? Do you have to apply pressure?
 

Flashgj

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#14
I think of the torque as more of a slight resistance. If I rest my hands anywhere on the steering wheel that is comfortable and just very slightly resist the movement as it is steering the car I do not get the nag.
 
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Ed Woodrick

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#16
So this falls more under curiosity than anything else. Just wondering...when autopilot is engaged are there "hotspots" on the steering wheel you have to touch to keep autopilot engaged (thinking maybe 10 and 2 o'clock?) or can you touch the wheel anywhere to keep it engaged? I wonder because I am one of those terrible drivers that tend to keep their hands on the bottom half of the wheel. Just wondering if I can just leave them there and not be worried about autopilot disengaging.

Thanks,

Dan
The nagging is satisfied by one of two conditions. The newest is button pushing, any button should do.

The historic is rotational force, aka torque. You know the force that it takes if the car is driving and you want to force it to go left or right? That's rotational force. You need more than 0 and less than the amount to take the car off of autopilot. Resting only one hand on the wheel is a common solution, sometimes I wedge a finger between my leg and pushing up on the wheel. Keeping both hands on the wheel tends to create a balanced effect, that's not what you want. You want to push the car slightly to one or the other direction.

Tesla is not the only car to require this, most other cars that provide "between the lanes" guidance require the same thing, except the Cadillac which has an eye sensor.
 

FRC

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#17
I find down on right stalk is one easy way, but I have transitioned to left scroll(volume wheel). Up or down one click works every single time.
 

masto

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#18
Everybody’s saying this in such a complicated way. You need to turn the wheel a tiny bit once in a while. Just a nudge. There’s no sensor to tell you’re holding it.
 

ADK46

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#20
The Tesla tutorials show a driver holding the wheel at 5 and 7, palms up. Works OK for me. 3 and 9 puts my arms up in the air, too much force, which is not relaxing and/or causes disengagement.

I find putting just one hand on the wheel doesn't work so well - the weight of my arm is too much, and if I have to hold my arm up, it becomes tiresome. Elbow resting on armrest or leg? Not enough force to convince the car I'm paying attention. But this has become my favorite position when combined with occasional wiggles which are slowly becoming automatic.

When I initiate a lane change, I let go of the wheel until it's done - my instincts interfere.

An unintended disengagement can be dangerous on a curve. Whatever technique you develop, it must not cause this.

While eating a big cinnamon bun that required two hands, I discovered that one knee held against the wheel works pretty well. You should not do this, of course. Big cinnamon buns are bad for you.