Auto Pilot not working on new Model 3

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DanC

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#1
I bought a Model 3. At the pickup center they told me I had to drive 50 miles to calibrate the autopilot. Then After I drove 70 miles I called Tesla and they told me to drive 500 miles. This seemed silly. I drove another 100 miles and called again. I was told to drive at least another 50 miles to 200 miles. Again it did not work. I called Tesla again and they told me they saw 5 error codes and I have to make an appointment to get it fixed. Except here in Texas I have to wait for them to call me back from Texas. Frustrated.
 

GDN

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#2
Sorry to hear the problem, but waiting on the call back seems weird. I've only needed one check with service. I called the 800 number and even though they were in CA they still made and confirmed an appointment at the local SC here in Dallas.

I did learn of an email this weekend and if they follow the same format - you should possibly be able to email austinservice@tesla.com - ask one of them to call you back. If you have more than on SC in Austin, use the more appropriate name.
 

PNWmisty

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#3
I bought a Model 3. At the pickup center they told me I had to drive 50 miles to calibrate the autopilot. Then After I drove 70 miles I called Tesla and they told me to drive 500 miles. This seemed silly. I drove another 100 miles and called again. I was told to drive at least another 50 miles to 200 miles. Again it did not work. I called Tesla again and they told me they saw 5 error codes and I have to make an appointment to get it fixed. Except here in Texas I have to wait for them to call me back from Texas. Frustrated.
You're going to love it once they fix it. It's one of the best features of one of the best cars available. Let us know how they fix it.

In the meantime, do you have any photos of your new chariot you would like to share?
 

Dano9258

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#4
Does your settings show all of the autopilot options? My car was supposed to have it at delivery and it didn't. Had to get an over the air update on Monday and it works awesome now!
 

Bernard

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#6
Does your settings show all of the autopilot options? My car was supposed to have it at delivery and it didn't. Had to get an over the air update on Monday and it works awesome now!
Does anyone have praise for EAP outside the interstate system?
I live in Hawaii (the island, so not Honolulu) -- no interstate highways, and a single stretch of 10 miles of divided highway with two lanes each way; everything is just plain 2-lane roads.
Cannot use Autosteer, as it will not exceed 45mph if it cannot figure out the speed limit -- and in 2'000mi of driving around the island, I have yet to see a single identified speed limit on the screen. (GPS is tracking just fine; there are places where LTE is lost, but my understanding was that speed limits were derived from GPS location, so it would seem that the work of entering in a database the speed limits for various sections of roads on Hawaii island has not yet been done.)
Adaptive cruise control works well, but suffers from "highway thinking": when a car is turning across the road in the distance in front of me, with lots of room and no need for deceleration, my car will slow down pretty hard (on an interstate, of course, this would be a terrifying event!); when the main road turns at a fairly sharp angle, but there is a secondary road that continues in straight line, the car will trigger emergency braking (!) if a car coming the other way on the main road enters the turn -- even though I have my turn signal on indicating I will angle left (and not go straight to plow into the vehicle coming the other way). When in follow mode, the adaptive cruise control is clumsy whenever the car it was following enters a right turn lane -- it continues to match the speed of that car until it disappears from the screen, meaning it brakes pretty hard, and then accelerates just as hard to regain the cruise speed, whereas a human driver would not have slowed at all.
So, while I immensely enjoy driving the car -- it's just fantastic to drive, best I've had in nearly 1'000'000 miles of driving --, I cannot say I am overjoyed by the EAP yet. I use it strictly as a cruise control mechanism in open country, and have to remember to turn it off in towns or at some of these turns, as well as when the car in front of me signals a right turn.
Now, I understand it is currently targeted exclusively at highway driving and I can leave with that: I've waited 2.3 years for the car and th ersult is brilliant, so I can wait another year or two for an EAP release that delivers on two-lane roads what it apparently delivers now on interstate highways.
 

littlD

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#7
I carefully used EAP on the curvy roads in Yellowstone National Park. Mind you, when I had no shoulder and a huge dropoff, I took care of that manually and just used TACC (Traffic Aware Cruise Control).

This allowed me to watch for wild animals and it worked pretty well. NOT it's main use case, mind you, but it did come in handy.

I also use it here in Saint Louis on US 67, works great in rush hour traffic.
 

GDN

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#8
@Bernard - I'm thinking that where you are and what you described I wouldn't find EAP all that useful. It's good in stop and go heavy traffic, good out on the freeways, etc. I'm thinking if I had your roads I'd just be having fun driving and taking the curvy roads and doing all the driving myself. If you see yourself moving and taking the car with you to a different location then maybe having it then would be more useful.
 

garsh

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#9
Does anyone have praise for EAP outside the interstate system?
I'm hoping that the v9 software includes some much-needed autopilot improvements. Probably won't, but I'm hoping.
my understanding was that speed limits were derived from GPS location, so it would seem that the work of entering in a database the speed limits for various sections of roads on Hawaii island has not yet been done.
That's my understanding as well. Unfortunately, I bet Hawaii is pretty low on their priority list.

The sad part is that they should be able to fill out their database just by downloading a handful of camera shots from Tesla cars in various locales. Run a vision-recognition system over those images to detect speed limit signs, and set road speed limits based on that information. If there's an area that's missing data, download a few extra still shots from cars in the vicinity, and eventually you should stumble across another speed limit sign. They should be able to automate this for the most part.
 

Bernard

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#10
I'm hoping that the v9 software includes some much-needed autopilot improvements. Probably won't, but I'm hoping.
That's my understanding as well. Unfortunately, I bet Hawaii is pretty low on their priority list.

The sad part is that they should be able to fill out their database just by downloading a handful of camera shots from Tesla cars in various locales. Run a vision-recognition system over those images to detect speed limit signs, and set road speed limits based on that information. If there's an area that's missing data, download a few extra still shots from cars in the vicinity, and eventually you should stumble across another speed limit sign. They should be able to automate this for the most part.
Well, the cameras are there and recognizing at least some fraction of speed limit signs is not hard to do, so we can hope. If version 9.x includes some of the first FSD features as tweeted by Musk, then recognizing street signs and traffic lights has to be a fairly high priority, so I'll be curious to see what is included.
 

Mrrobot

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#11
Hi Bernard I also live in Hawaii and I notice the same issue with auto steer having 45 mph speed limit on queen k. Have you contacted support about this? I will later this week as it’s a shame if I can’t use/test auto steer if it won’t go above 55mph
 

Bernard

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#12
Hi Bernard I also live in Hawaii and I notice the same issue with auto steer having 45 mph speed limit on queen k. Have you contacted support about this? I will later this week as it’s a shame if I can’t use/test auto steer if it won’t go above 55mph
I haven't contacted support -- it did not seem like a bug, more like what we get accustomed to here on the Big Island ;-) (For instance, Google Maps states that it updates its aerial photos every 1-2 years, but it just updated them for the Kohala area a week ago, replacing photos from January 2013 ;-) But I guess it could not hurt.
(Anyway, I am not ready to trust Autosteer yet -- small experiments so far have been more worrisome than anything else, except for the Akoni Pule highway, the Daniel Inouye highway, the Queen's highway, and selected parts of the Belt Road -- all areas where one would want to drive faster than 45mph. On the Kohala crest road, for instance, I tried it (speed limit is below 45mph), but it tried to plow through curves at least 4 times... If the road markings are a bit worn, as they often are on the Big Island, Autosteer gets into trouble...)
 

Mrrobot

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#13
Of course! Wouldn’t want to use it on faded or non existent road markers. I would like to use it on my commute on queen k as I drive it every day to work. I like the auto cruise but I do notice that it sometimes like to break heavily when there’s a car merging. Will let you know if I do get auto steer to go above 45mph
 
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#14
Does anyone have praise for EAP outside the interstate system?
I live in Hawaii (the island, so not Honolulu) -- no interstate highways, and a single stretch of 10 miles of divided highway with two lanes each way; everything is just plain 2-lane roads.
Cannot use Autosteer, as it will not exceed 45mph if it cannot figure out the speed limit -- and in 2'000mi of driving around the island, I have yet to see a single identified speed limit on the screen. (GPS is tracking just fine; there are places where LTE is lost, but my understanding was that speed limits were derived from GPS location, so it would seem that the work of entering in a database the speed limits for various sections of roads on Hawaii island has not yet been done.)
Adaptive cruise control works well, but suffers from "highway thinking": when a car is turning across the road in the distance in front of me, with lots of room and no need for deceleration, my car will slow down pretty hard (on an interstate, of course, this would be a terrifying event!); when the main road turns at a fairly sharp angle, but there is a secondary road that continues in straight line, the car will trigger emergency braking (!) if a car coming the other way on the main road enters the turn -- even though I have my turn signal on indicating I will angle left (and not go straight to plow into the vehicle coming the other way). When in follow mode, the adaptive cruise control is clumsy whenever the car it was following enters a right turn lane -- it continues to match the speed of that car until it disappears from the screen, meaning it brakes pretty hard, and then accelerates just as hard to regain the cruise speed, whereas a human driver would not have slowed at all.
So, while I immensely enjoy driving the car -- it's just fantastic to drive, best I've had in nearly 1'000'000 miles of driving --, I cannot say I am overjoyed by the EAP yet. I use it strictly as a cruise control mechanism in open country, and have to remember to turn it off in towns or at some of these turns, as well as when the car in front of me signals a right turn.
Now, I understand it is currently targeted exclusively at highway driving and I can leave with that: I've waited 2.3 years for the car and th ersult is brilliant, so I can wait another year or two for an EAP release that delivers on two-lane roads what it apparently delivers now on interstate highways.

Has your Autopilot started working above 45mph. Iʻm on Maui and just yesterday Feb. 6 my car has started getting speed limit data.
 

Bernard

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#15
Has your Autopilot started working above 45mph. Iʻm on Maui and just yesterday Feb. 6 my car has started getting speed limit data.
Not yet. Am on 50.6, but only the last 4 days; took a trip down the coast (from Kohala to Capt Cook), did not see any speed limits. But a Model 3 driver reported getting his first speed limit in Waimea. Promising!
I'll keep watch!
 
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#16
I don't know if it helped but I Twitted Elon last week on the issue he didn't respond but I would like to think it helped. :) I already been on 50.6 before it happened.
 

Tom Hudson

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#17
Interesting. I'm currently on New Zealand's south island, in Nelson. Been driving here for the last couple of weeks and can't imagine that Autopilot would ever work here. Main highway up the west side of the island is a super twisty, hairpin-riddled two-lane highway with a BUNCH of one-lane bridges! Most of it carries a 100kph speed limit but that's just crazy; every time the road straightens out enough to get near that speed, you hit another 75- or 55- or 35-kph curve! I did a 6-hour drive on it the other day and was mentally exhausted. I could definitely go for a car that could drive itself in these conditions; a worthy goal for Autopilot engineers!

On a semi-related topic... driving a Kia Sportage (wanted a compact car but Dollar didn't have any) and keep trying to shift gears with the turn signal stalk (on the right side of the wheel here)! Ugh.
 

Bernard

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#18
Not yet. Am on 50.6, but only the last 4 days; took a trip down the coast (from Kohala to Capt Cook), did not see any speed limits. But a Model 3 driver reported getting his first speed limit in Waimea. Promising!
I'll keep watch!
Yes!!! got them the entire trip down from North Kohala to Kona, changing appropriately.
It was on Dec. 4, 2018, that the dev team at Tesla, after getting specifics from me on GPS coordinates, road numbers and names, speed limits along those roads, etc., concluded that the problem was with the maps they used for the Big Island (and, by extension, for the other "neighbor" islands -- Maui, Kauai, Lanai, Molokai). They promised they would pressure their colleagues on the maps side to work on better maps for Hawaii -- and here we are, just 2 months later and it's done. I sent a note of thanks to Tim Tsuda and crew at Tesla.
Maps must have gotten updated in the last 4 days, because I drove the same itinerary Saturday last and never saw any speed limits. Today, though, finally got to experience what almost all Tesla drivers experience daily -- and so also tried running Autopilot along the road (worked generally pretty well, gets confused by the unmarked merge lanes used in Hawaii -- moved right to stay "in the middle" of its suddenly much wider lane ;-)