Amp draw for "Cyber-Truck" on board Charger? (Ex.: 80a @ 240v?)

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Jeda - Tesla Tech Accessories

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Does anyone have better than just-a-guess information (until Nov. 21st) as to what the maximum Amp draw that the "Cyber-Truck" will want for its on-board charger?
[i.e.: NOT to be confused with the box on the wall that is more properly referred to as an EVSE.]

Note:
I am aware that _TODAY_, the largest capacity (on-board) charger that Tesla sells is a 11.52 kW (48 amp @ 240 volts, single phase). I am also aware that in the past, 22kW/91.666Amp (for the 2016 & earlier dual charger version), and 16.5kW/68.75Amps HAD BEEN the largest size chargers that were available.

What I would like to know, for planning my future installations, is:
What the maximum amps I should (have) plan(ed) for at 240 volts, single phase?




========================================
ASIDE (not 100% on the main topic):


Here is part of why I am asking...
I installed a 1.25" SCH 80 conduit out to a post in my driveway. I also have two sets of THWN-2 conductors waiting to go into that conduit: #6 for the NEMA 6-50 receptacle, #4 for the larger permanently mounted EVSE (probably ~100Amp ckt.) & one green #8 for the ground.

Then I found out about NFPA-70 (the NEC) Article 625.44(B)(2):
"(2) It is intended for connection to receptacle outlets rated no more than 50 amperes"
Uhhhh WHAT? It appears that the 2017 edition slipped in a limit such that 60 amp receptacles can no longer approved for use with an EVSE. Huh. I guess my future proofing, by getting one size larger conductors (#6AWG) for a 60 amp receptacle, is now only to be used for reducing voltage drop. Oh well.

(On a related note, by now we all should know about NEC Article 612.40 and the 125% and/or 80% rule.)

So, back to the #4 conductors... I don't want to pull them in just yet, as I do not want to create a not-yet-necessary splice in the "Temporary RV Power Outlet Box". Which really boils down to...

Do I think that the 19.2 kW capacity (80a on 100a ckt.) is all I will need for a Tesla "Cyber Truck" (or whatever it ends up being called) ???

I guess I've already thrown the dice on that account.
Now it's just a matter of buying the model Y and/or Truck, and buying/installing a HPWC.



17.088
 

garsh

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Does anyone have better than just-a-guess information (until Nov. 21st) as to what the maximum Amp draw that the "Cyber-Truck" will want for its on-board charger?
No, nobody does.

That said, a Tesla wall connector maxes out at 100 amp connection (delivering 80 amps). You can also daisy-chain two or more wall connectors to let them share a single feed. I doubt that the cybertruck will allow anything greater than what a wall connector can provide.
 

Ed Woodrick

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Since we have basically no idea of what it even looks like, detailed information is definitely behind that.

There's not necessarily any requirement that the truck will use anything other that the standard charger in the car today. They've even moved away from the dual charger in cars, but who knows.

I'm not sure why you are worrying about a 60A receptacle. Are you thinking that the HPWC is a receptacle?
 

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I'm not sure we can know what the draw of the cybertruck will b, but this conversation comes up pretty frequently. Unless you are talking about extremely long wire runs I would overbuild on the wiring capacity and go for 100A or something because retrofitting at some unknown future time will be a pain in the neck. If its in conduit you can easily access to replace the wire in the future that might be a different story. My charger outlet is about 1 foot from my breaker box so I can upgrade at any time with very limited cost and effort and based on that I went with a lower amperage for my Model 3. Most people can't upgrade quickly and easily without opening walls and such.
 

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"Opie" here.

I suspect that my original concern was overblown.

If you look at the latter "ASIDE" section, you will see that I already have a 1.25" SCH 80 conduit, ready to take the two pairs of conductors to the post that I'm concerned about:
* The first is a set of #4 AWG wires (#3 would have been only a very slightly better choice) that was always was intended for a 100 Amp breaker (80 Amp continuous load). {Remember Article 240.4(B) re next larger C.B.. }
** The second is a set of #6 AWG wires that was initially intended to (and does) get fed by a 50 Amp breaker. Notice that I did NOT use #8 AWG, that was on purpose; the intent was to eventually upgrade to a 60 Amp breaker.

Then I learned about something new: Article 625.44(A)(3)...

It seems that the NFPA passed a "Tentative Interim Amendment" for new language to be inserted into the 2017 NEC, AFTER it had been printed! (BTW, it sounds like the same or similar language is due to be included in the 2020 edition: THIS IS NOT CONFIRMED!)
The relevant articles are: 625.44(A), 625.54(New) and 625.56(New).

625.44(A) Portable Equipment. Portable equipment shall be connected to the premises wiring
systems by one or more of the following methods:
==CLIP==
(3) A nonlocking, 2-pole, 3-wire or 3-pole, 4-wire grounding-type receptacle outlet rated at 250 volts, single phase, 30 or 50 amperes

In other words, for a _PLUG_IN_ receptacle (versus hard wired), one can no longer use a 60 Amp 120/240 volt rated receptacle (i.e.: the NEMA 14-60R).


So...
I'll just have to settle for 50 Amps at my 2nd power source at that particular location.
That should still be plenty.


17.088




p.s.:
I was in a one car accident in the evening of Tuesday the 19th. A semi was moving into my lane, I stomped on the brakes, fish-taled, went up onto the curb, and T-boned a fire hydrant.

While writing this note, I learned that our Kia Sportage has now been "Insurance Totaled".
Hmmmp. I wasn't planning on buying a new car (Model Y) until 2020 or 2021.
It looks like I am about to become a Model 3 owner after all.
Don't get me wrong, I KNOW it's a great car, but our family was expecting the greater storage space in the Model Y (and I want a hitch).

Oh well, I'm still alive, and unhurt. Count my blessings. It should still be a very good consolation prize.

.
 

GDN

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I'm not a mathematician nor remember all of the electrical formulas, but here is my bet now that we know we have a 500 mile battery in the top config. We'll first have to know just how big that battery truly is, but the onboard charger and any potentially new WC's will be big enough to charge that biggest battery in less than 8 hours.

It'll be very easy for someone who really uses this truck as a hard core work truck or pulls a trailer on a daily basis to go through that battery on most work days. To be useful you'll need a full charge on site in 8 hours or less.

It could easily have a dual charger setup or we might even see WC's with more capacity. You'll need good electrical service with a 200 amp minimum panel likely to support charging on a daily basis. That is likely the bottom end.
 

Feathermerchant

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Another way to look at it. I have turned my Model 3's Gen1 UMC (40A capable) to 30A because I don't need to charge as fast as 40A will. I don't even need 30A really.
So probably charging at 40A or 50A will be plenty for the truck if you assume twice the consumption per mile.
 

Reliev

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some youtube video said that you could charge a truck with the other truck not sure where it is said but no idea on the specs since it's so far out I'm sure we will find out as Elon answers the questions probably via twitter.
 

Feathermerchant

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Since you can charge any Tesla from 120 or 240VAC then you would be able to charge from the Cybertruck. You may have to turn down the Amps though to match the inverter capacity.
 

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