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Mad Hungarian

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@Mad Hungarian. So it sounds to me like the 18x9.0 +30 would provide a better looking stance and performance, perhaps with a little sacrifice to ride quality while the 18x8 +40 should provide the better ride quality with a small sacrifice in appearance. Would you agree with this?
Very fair to say, although my personal preference would be to run the 18x9.0 at +40 to keep the stance and aero properties in line.
The 18x9.0 at +30 will indeed fit, just a wee bit on the pokey side. Perfect if you want a noticeably aggressive look though.
 

Ken Voss

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Very fair to say, although my personal preference would be to run the 18x9.0 at +40 to keep the stance and aero properties in line.
The 18x9.0 at +30 will indeed fit, just a wee bit on the pokey side. Perfect if you want a noticeably aggressive look though.
Yes agreed, so the next question is where to buy them in the states?
 

Ken Voss

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Decisions, decisions. I am a 3/31/16 California line stander and I suspect that I will be getting an invitation soon. I have decided on Red Multi Coat, actually my wife decided on the color so Red it is!.

I plan to configure with stock 18" wheels and imminently swap them with after market 18" wheels. As of today it seems that there are only 2 viable aftermarket options:

I am leaning toward the FC04 but have not fully decided. Opinions of Forum members are appreciated.

Wheels.png
 
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garsh

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Decisions, decisions. I am a 3/31/16 California line stander and I suspect that I will be getting an invitation soon. I have decided on Red Multi Coat, actually my wife decided on the color so Red it is!.

I plan to configure with stock 18" wheels and imminently swap them with after market 18" wheels. As of today it seems that there are only 2 viable aftermarket options:

I am leaning toward the FC04 but have not fully decided. Opinions of Forum members will are appreciated.

View attachment 5343
I was originally thinking I'd go with the TST Turbines too. But they don't offer them in a wider size than 8.5". So now I'm leaning towards the titanium FC04 in 9" (front) and 10" (rear) widths. But I think I need to see them mounted on a 3 before I can decide for sure that it looks good to me.
 
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RichD

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I was originally thinking I'd go with the TST Turbines too. But they don't offer them in a wider size than 8.5". So now I'm leaning towards the titanium FC04 in 9" (front) and 10" (rear) widths. But I think I need to see them mounted on a 3 before I can decide for sure that it looks good to me.
Why a staggered set up?
 

Michael Russo

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Decisions, decisions. (...)
I am leaning toward the FC04 but have not fully decided. Opinions of Forum members are appreciated.
View attachment 5343
Ken, nice to see them side by side. TST is more ‘classic T≡SLA’, yet FC04 is more original and kicks a..!!
Definitely b for me. Would make me reconsider the 19’’ Sports Wheels if available in Europe 2H19... :cool:
 

emolas

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Last edited:

Michael Russo

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I'm considering this wheels
https://www.rayswheels.co.jp/products/wheel.php?lang=ja&wheel=57FXX
Size:18 8.5J +38 114.3/5H
Color is SU. It weights about 21 lbs.

I like this one but it's a bit heavy …
https://www.rayswheels.co.jp/products/wheel.php?lang=ja&wheel=2X7
Size:18 8.5J +38 114.3/5H
Color is SP. It weights about 22.5 lbs.

Sorry in Japanese.
Both are nice, @emolas . First one looks actually a bit like a dark FC04.
In any case, respectfully, you’ve got loads of time to make up your mind... ;)
 
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Jaspal

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Does anyone know where I can get the wheel installed if I order the Tsportline TST 19” wheel with the tires.

Also, looking at their website they are selling the wheels themselves for $1,500+ And the matte black ones for 100$ more. For the wheel and tire package they are selling them for $3,400 approximately after taxes. Which is expensive in my taste. So I was wondering if I buy the wheels and the tires separately I could save like $500. Because the 19” Continental tires are like $250 each. Or I could just pay $3,400 and get them installed from someone.

What’s the best route to take?

FYI: I may or may not sell the standard aero wheels.
 

MichelT3

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My local tyre service centre will do it for you for just € 25 per wheel.
You just need to come to The Netherlands ... LOL!
 

Michael Russo

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18, going on 20... ;)


And to complement, with Ben promoting one of his sponsors... ;)
Just to see a bit of movement...


For me, the aesthetics is undoubtedly a plus... yet I for one wouldn’t want to deal with the total cost... Wheels themselves may be reasonably affordable, yet when you lump in price of the tires, and the wear & tear of those...???

Maybe if you go P and $ don’t matter... :)
 

TeslaFanDC

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I have no real desire to mod my car, but I want the 18" tires and can't stand the look of the standard aero wheels (covers on or off). Any thoughts on these in Brilliant Silver to go with the Deep Blue Metallic Model 3? https://evwheeldirect.com/products/evt-wheel-for-tesla-model-3-18-inch

I figure I could have the OEM tires placed on these rims and balanced for $100 locally and then sell the OEM Aero Wheels. Any downsides I'm missing?
 
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Mad Hungarian

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I have no real desire to mod my car, but I want the 18" tires and can't stand the look of the standard aero wheels (covers on or off). Any thoughts on these in Brilliant Silver to go with the Deep Blue Metallic Model 3? https://evwheeldirect.com/products/evt-wheel-for-tesla-model-3-18-inch

I figure I could have the OEM tires placed on these rims and balanced for $100 locally and then sell the OEM Aero Wheels. Any downsides I'm missing?
The only notable downside I see is weight, there's no mention of what these weigh.
But unless they're forged or flow-formed there's little chance they'll approach the 21 lbs weight of the OE 18" wheel. So you might lose a little range in stop-and-go city driving. Highway is all about aero, so they won't do as well as the OE with covers on but will likely do as well or better there than most aftermarket designs.
On that front, it's interesting to note that even a very open design wheel doesn't appear to have catastrophic consequences for highway range on the 3. Bjorn Nyland did a steady-state two-way highway test with @youyouxue 's car with our FC04s and Yokohama AVS Sport A/S tires on it and still managed to get the full rated 310 mi / 500 km range running at 55 mph. I expect this would be virtually the same as running the OE wheel sans aero cover, as they are very similar in design.
 
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Bokonon

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The only notable downside I see is weight, there's no mention of what these weigh.
But unless they're forged or flow-formed there's little chance they'll approach the 21 lbs weight of the OE 18" wheel.

Related question, as someone in the same boat as @TeslaFanDC (looking for blue + silver wheels): are there any metrics or rules-of-thumb that we can use as consumers to gauge the strength of a given wheel?

As I browse aftermarket wheels here in the middle of pothole season, one of my big concerns -- especially as I see vendors try to outdo each other on price -- is purchasing a set of wheels that are structurally weak compared to the OEM wheels, possibly because the vendor "cheaped out" on the materials or manufacturing process.

Per TireRack's helpful Wheel Construction tutorial, I'm aware that the manufacturing process chosen for a wheel can affect its strength/weight ratio. Unfortunately, in the case with EV Wheels Direct, I cannot find any details with respect to manufacturing process or weight on their website. Even if we had this information (as we do in the case of TSportline's wheels), how can we translate it into assurance that the wheels are sufficiently study?

Also, it seems like most aftermarket wheel vendors will state that their wheels have been "impact-tested to SAE J2530 standard". (Presumably, this statement also implies that the wheels actually *passed* the test?). As a lay person who merely has the ability to google "SAE J2530 standard", I don't have much of a sense for whether this is a respectable, confidence-inspiring metric, or merely a baseline level of quality, along the lines of "this breakfast cereal does not contain arsenic". Do you have any insight from your years of experience?

Thanks, as always!
 

apmowery

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I p
Decisions, decisions. I am a 3/31/16 California line stander and I suspect that I will be getting an invitation soon. I have decided on Red Multi Coat, actually my wife decided on the color so Red it is!.

I plan to configure with stock 18" wheels and imminently swap them with after market 18" wheels. As of today it seems that there are only 2 viable aftermarket options:

I am leaning toward the FC04 but have not fully decided. Opinions of Forum members are appreciated.

View attachment 5343
I purchased the TST 18" turbines in silver for my midnight silver metallic model 3 - can't wait to get them. Expected delivery is mid April for the rims according to sportsline. I'm driving my model 3 with the stock aero wheels (took the caps off & purchased the $100 lug caps & center caps from sportsline) - it looks sweet, but really looking forward to the silver 18's
 

Mad Hungarian

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Related question, as someone in the same boat as @TeslaFanDC (looking for blue + silver wheels): are there any metrics or rules-of-thumb that we can use as consumers to gauge the strength of a given wheel?

As I browse aftermarket wheels here in the middle of pothole season, one of my big concerns -- especially as I see vendors try to outdo each other on price -- is purchasing a set of wheels that are structurally weak compared to the OEM wheels, possibly because the vendor "cheaped out" on the materials or manufacturing process.

Per TireRack's helpful Wheel Construction tutorial, I'm aware that the manufacturing process chosen for a wheel can affect its strength/weight ratio. Unfortunately, in the case with EV Wheels Direct, I cannot find any details with respect to manufacturing process or weight on their website. Even if we had this information (as we do in the case of TSportline's wheels), how can we translate it into assurance that the wheels are sufficiently study?

Also, it seems like most aftermarket wheel vendors will state that their wheels have been "impact-tested to SAE J2530 standard". (Presumably, this statement also implies that the wheels actually *passed* the test?). As a lay person who merely has the ability to google "SAE J2530 standard", I don't have much of a sense for whether this is a respectable, confidence-inspiring metric, or merely a baseline level of quality, along the lines of "this breakfast cereal does not contain arsenic". Do you have any insight from your years of experience?

Thanks, as always!
I am supposed to write a whole piece on testing standards for the Wheel/Tire Tech thread but am having trouble getting around to that one, it can be a weighty affair to explain thoroughly.
It's nice to know the construction technique used as it gives us some insight to the wheel's characteristics, but in terms of absolutely strength it doesn't tell the whole story. I can design a wheel that uses plain old gravity casting and make it plenty strong enough to withstand the worst abuse a commercial heavy duty pickup will throw at it on a really bad day. Likewise I can design a fully forged wheel that might faint at the mere sight of a Montreal pothole. Although the fancier construction types like flow-forming and forging definitely offer weight reduction advantages for a given load capacity over cast wheels, there are way too many design variables to give a blanket preference to one type of construction over another for outright durability.
What you really want to know is what standard was the wheel tested to, and what is the maximum rated load specified.
In the case of the EV Wheels Direct Turbine, they claim to be testing to SAE J2530 at a rated load of 1650 lbs. J2530 is a pretty good standard, it was cooked up as a joint venture between SAE and SEMA's Wheel and Tire Council industry folks as an upgrade over the more common JWL standards that have been around for decades. We've made it our go-to standard for all new design for the past few years. Now don't get me wrong, JWL is good, plenty for most cars in fact, but SAE is even tougher and I have a lot of confidence in its results. IF, and that's a big if, it is done to the letter. I've been to a lot factories in my day, and seen a lot of dusty, unplugged testing equipment. And still seen all kinds of testing certifications on the wall and cast into the wheels.
As for the rated load, 1650 lbs is more than enough for the rear axle of an LR Model 3, which only requires 1385.5 lbs per wheel to pass.
So if the testing was done properly, and the factory builds them carefully, hopefully with lots of regular QC testing, these wheels should handle daily use with ease.
 
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oripaamoni

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tst wheels would look so much better if they had more concavity to them, more like the rear turbines. Unfortunately to me they just look like cheap replicas. I love the look of the aeros without the covers, but need a bigger wheel to make it look right, a 19" option of that same style wheel in staggered setup is what I am going to replace my aeros with once its time for tires.

Its a bit unfair for me to judge the tst wheels without seeing them in person, I keep hoping to run in to Ben and see them in RL since all his videos are rolling around my neighborhood!