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Modmike

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Yup! Tap audio from active speakers, send to LOC + Amplifiers, send back to inactive speakers. Only need a small amp to power the tweeters and small rear deck mids, unless you want to take it further and get the tweeters in the A pillars.

In terms of elegance, can I just buy the Tesla sub and amp and feed it the audio?
 

Modmike

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I have asked this of Tesla people twice, they didn't know. I think there may be software limitations.

The only limitation would be if they disabled a second set of outputs for the rear amp. I’ve read the article a few times and maybe you can answer a question: Does the head unit have 1 or 2 sets of outputs? If it’s only one, then I think just getting the original parts may work.
 

PLUR

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The only limitation would be if they disabled a second set of outputs for the rear amp. I’ve read the article a few times and maybe you can answer a question: Does the head unit have 1 or 2 sets of outputs? If it’s only one, then I think just getting the original parts may work.

If you think of adding the OEM sub/amp as a plug and play, it's very tricky. You still have to run power cable wiring and wiring for the speakers not active. I made a thread for SR+ that might be useful to read here.
 
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R1Fast

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By the way, you want your ignition resistor to be in parallel with the relay switch. I'm not sure what wiring it to the 12v battery would do... looks like the amp would constantly be drawing small amounts of power, and the BMS may not like that. When you have a resistor across the relay switch, the amp pulls small amounts of current from the penthouse 12V only when the car is off, and this has proven to work for many folks here.

I agree that would make more sense. So like the below diagram then, correct?

Also I"m a little confused around which/how many resistors are needed. Earlier in the thread it was recommended to use a 1-3 Ohm ignition resistor.... and separately in the thread I believe @Jamie Sibley (or maybe @_Travis_ suggested to use a 2.4 Ohm, 100W resistor. I assume then that these interchangeable in the diagram as far as placement and purpose, correct? Or is the 2.4ohm/100w resistor hooked up elsewhere for a separate purpose? I bought both because I wasn't sure:

1) 1.3 ohm / 30w ignition resistor (in diagram)
2) 2.4 ohm / 100w resistor (amazon)

relay-soft-startv2.png

Ive always used general 1N4001s for relays. Yours looks like an insane relay though so you can always verify with a scope if the voltage is going super negative
The reverse voltage on the diode should be about 14V. As long as the diode has high enough current carrying capacity it should clamp the forward voltage to about 1V.

So as long as the diode can handle ~14v it really shouldn't matter as long as its ~3a? E.g. in theory one could use a 3a/400v (or even 1000v) diode for a ridiculous amount of overhead then?
 
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LRonHoyabembe

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I agree that would make more sense. So like the below diagram then, correct?

Also I"m a little confused around which/how many resistors are needed. Earlier in the thread it was recommended to use a 1-3 Ohm ignition resistor.... and separately in the thread I believe @Jamie Sibley (or maybe @_Travis_ suggested to use a 2.4 Ohm, 100W resistor. I assume then that these interchangeable in the diagram as far as placement and purpose, correct? Or is the 2.4ohm/100w resistor hooked up elsewhere for a separate purpose? I bought both because I wasn't sure:

1) 1.3 ohm / 30w ignition resistor (in diagram)
2) 2.4 ohm / 100w resistor (amazon)

View attachment 26564



So as long as the diode can handle ~14v it really shouldn't matter as long as its ~3a? E.g. in theory one could use a 3a/400v (or even 1000v) diode for a ridiculous amount of overhead then?
I can’t speak to the diode details because I used an SSR with a built in snubber diode. But here’s how you can figure out the resistor: https://www.rapidtables.com/calc/electric/watt-volt-amp-calculator.html

A 2.4 ohm resistor at 14.4V will limit current to 6A, but at that rate it will need to handle 86.4 watts. So a 100W resistor is good. Any lower and you run the risk of it overheating.

Personally, I found a 4 ohm 100w resistor which will limit current to ~3.5A. This seems to work well too. As long as it can handle the power and provide the amp enough current to precharge you should be fine.
 

JWardell

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I agree that would make more sense. So like the below diagram then, correct?

Also I"m a little confused around which/how many resistors are needed. Earlier in the thread it was recommended to use a 1-3 Ohm ignition resistor.... and separately in the thread I believe @Jamie Sibley (or maybe @_Travis_ suggested to use a 2.4 Ohm, 100W resistor. I assume then that these interchangeable in the diagram as far as placement and purpose, correct? Or is the 2.4ohm/100w resistor hooked up elsewhere for a separate purpose? I bought both because I wasn't sure:

1) 1.3 ohm / 30w ignition resistor (in diagram)
2) 2.4 ohm / 100w resistor (amazon)

View attachment 26564



So as long as the diode can handle ~14v it really shouldn't matter as long as its ~3a? E.g. in theory one could use a 3a/400v (or even 1000v) diode for a ridiculous amount of overhead then?

You should be fine with any of those resistors. Recharge is probably quick so it won't have a chance to heat up enough to test its wattage, unless you don't have remote off.

The diode statement is incorrect, negative voltages out of the coil could spike as high as 50-100V. But a regular diode as I mentioned can handle 100V no problem. This is why car electronics that meat actual specifications are rated to handle quick spikes to -100V (and junk stuff eventually fries). Turning off inductors can be nasty :) The diode prevents that from going elsewhere.
 

R1Fast

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You should be fine with any of those resistors. Recharge is probably quick so it won't have a chance to heat up enough to test its wattage, unless you don't have remote off.

The diode statement is incorrect, negative voltages out of the coil could spike as high as 50-100V. But a regular diode as I mentioned can handle 100V no problem. This is why car electronics that meat actual specifications are rated to handle quick spikes to -100V (and junk stuff eventually fries). Turning off inductors can be nasty :) The diode prevents that from going elsewhere.

Thanks @JWardell ! That helps a ton.

I was also considering the best way to wire the remote turn-on from vcleft with multiple components. I'm using a Fosgate 360 LOC, Mosconi 6to8 and the JL amp. Is there any concern with wiring order on the side going to the components? Since the remote lead from vcleft is split before the SSR and the components, I wouldn't think so but would be good to be sure.

E.g. should I wire in series starting with the amp? Or does it really matter as long as the remote is connected to the a coil contact on the SSR?

Such as:

remote.PNG
 

Jamie Sibley

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All the equipment shares the remote line in parallel. The only disadvantage to wiring them in series, as shown above , would be introducing multiple points of mechanical failure.
Also, the above resistor 2.4ohm 100w should be fine. Like JWardell said, the recharge is only for a few tenths of a second, and the resistor shouldn't experience any temperature rise.
 

JWardell

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Everything mentioned, and as pictured above, is in parallel. I'm not sure what you mean by wired in series, unless you mean physical placement, which doesn't matter much. The diagram looks correct to me.
 

LRonHoyabembe

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You should be fine with any of those resistors. Recharge is probably quick so it won't have a chance to heat up enough to test its wattage, unless you don't have remote off.

The diode statement is incorrect, negative voltages out of the coil could spike as high as 50-100V. But a regular diode as I mentioned can handle 100V no problem. This is why car electronics that meat actual specifications are rated to handle quick spikes to -100V (and junk stuff eventually fries). Turning off inductors can be nasty :) The diode prevents that from going elsewhere.

Or if you're like me and bought a faulty relay that wasn't switching on, thus sending 100% of your current through the resistor :oops: Needless to say, I now have a 5A inline fuse on the resistor circuit juuuuuussst in case.
 
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RoccoX

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Hey all,

I am adding an emergency release to my rear doors, so I decided to start my stereo upgrade project and replace the rear speakers with Infinity Reference 4022’s which I just ordered. Any tips beyond what is in the current threads? Also more importantly for the dash speakers what size torxs bit do they take? I found these and am wondering if one of them would fit and do the trick.

Amazon product
Thanks
 

Defjukie

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When you say rear speakers, are you referring the ones in the door or the rear parcel shelf? If the latter, please take some pics and document how to get to them. Those are the only speakers I haven't seen a tutorial for.
 

RoccoX

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When you say rear speakers, are you referring the ones in the door or the rear parcel shelf? If the latter, please take some pics and document how to get to them. Those are the only speakers I haven't seen a tutorial for.

Ha no the rear doors, I read about the parcel shelf, I don’t mind being the second person to do that, but not the first :)
 

Defjukie

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Honestly, I’d personally be more reluctant to do the doors given that they’re essentially fused to door trim. Anything requiring a dremel is a bridge too far for me.
 

RoccoX

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That does not bother me too much, I am taking the panels off anyways if I don’t feel comfortable once I look at it then I will save them for the dash. My fear with the dash is a torx bit that will fit, which is why I was curious on the size needed, to try and order something ahead of time.
 

John

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That does not bother me too much, I am taking the panels off anyways if I don’t feel comfortable once I look at it then I will save them for the dash. My fear with the dash is a torx bit that will fit, which is why I was curious on the size needed, to try and order something ahead of time.

When I had my windshield replaced last week, I looked down mid-job at the sound bar—now fully exposed from a standing position—and thought, "Darn. This would have been a good time to replace some tweeters!"
 

PLUR

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Hey all,

I am adding an emergency release to my rear doors, so I decided to start my stereo upgrade project and replace the rear speakers with Infinity Reference 4022’s which I just ordered. Any tips beyond what is in the current threads? Also more importantly for the dash speakers what size torxs bit do they take? I found these and am wondering if one of them would fit and do the trick.

Amazon product
Thanks
Consider buying this set
Only 10$ and it's all that's needed for dash speakers

If you do the rear door, post your how-to with pic if possible. I saw the how-to from one user before but still waiting out for now.
 
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R1Fast

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Or if you're like me and bought a faulty relay that wasn't switching on, thus sending 100% of your current through the resistor :oops: Needless to say, I now have a 5A inline fuse on the resistor circuit juuuuuussst in case.

Good idea! How many watts is your resistor? I am thinking a ~7a since I am using a 100w resistor and i = w / v (100/14.5ish = 6.9)

Everything mentioned, and as pictured above, is in parallel. I'm not sure what you mean by wired in series, unless you mean physical placement, which doesn't matter much. The diagram looks correct to me.

Agreed that the diagram is in parallel but isn't the remote lead an exception (since they would be daisy chained)? Illustrated using this crudely designed caveman drawing:

p v s.png